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      1. Author :
        Luo, Z R; Huang, T; Li, W; Shen, B Z
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Panminerva medica
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        52
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Diagnostic Imaging; Luminescence; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Molecular Dynamics Simulation
      12. Abstract :
        AIM The aim of this study was to evaluate the veracity and sensitivity of in-vivo imaging system (IVIS) for inspection of tumor dynamic morphology. METHODS Mouse melanoma cells (B16-F10-luc-G5) in 100 mL media were seeded into a 96-well plate by 1:2 serial dilution from 10000 cells (well #1) to 78 cells (well #8). The plate was imaged using IVIS system to evaluate its sensitivity for luminescence. Ten Bablc mice with tumor cells were injected subcutaneously (1 x 10(5) in 100 mL) and tumor luminescence was detected by IVIS at Day 0, Day 3, Day 5, Day 7 and Day 9. RESULTS As few as 78 tumor cells were detectable by IVIS. A strong correlation between number of tumor cells and bioluminescence (R2=0.99) was also demonstrated. Tumor luminescence were observed in all mice by IVIS at all days, and there was significant difference (P<0.01) between each two days from Day 0 to Day 9. Moreover, tumor dynamic morphology could be monitored by IVIS when it is invisible. CONCLUSION Compared with conventional methods, with high veracity and sensitivity, IVIS system should be recommended as an effective method for inspection of tumor dynamic morphology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20228722
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8995
      1. Author :
        Lyons, Scott K; Lim, Ed; Clermont, Anne O; Dusich, Joan; Zhu, Lingyun; Campbell, Kenneth D; Coffee, Richard J; Grass, David S; Hunter, John; Purchio, Tony; Jenkins, Darlene
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        66
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Androgens; Animals; Bioware; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic; Disease Models, Animal; Genes, Reporter; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; In Situ Hybridization; Luciferases, Firefly; Luminescent Measurements; Male; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; PC-3M-luc; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Prostate; Prostate-Specific Antigen; Prostatic Neoplasms
      12. Abstract :
        Several transgenic mouse models of prostate cancer have been developed recently that are able to recapitulate many key biological features of the human condition. It would, therefore, be desirable to employ these models to test the efficacy of new therapeutics before clinical trial; however, the variable onset and non-visible nature of prostate tumor development limit their use for such applications. We now report the generation of a transgenic reporter mouse that should obviate these limitations by enabling noninvasive in vivo bioluminescence imaging of normal and spontaneously transformed prostate tissue in the mouse. We used an 11-kb fragment of the human prostate-specific antigen (PSA) promoter to achieve specific and robust expression of firefly luciferase in the prostate glands of transgenic mice. Ex vivo bioluminescence imaging and in situ hybridization analysis confirmed that luciferase expression was restricted to the epithelium in all four lobes of the prostate. We also show that PSA-Luc mice exhibit decreased but readily detectable levels of in vivo bioluminescence over extended time periods following androgen ablation. These results suggest that this reporter should enable in vivo imaging of both androgen-dependent and androgen-independent prostate tumor models. As proof-of-principle, we show that we could noninvasively image SV40 T antigen-induced prostate tumorigenesis in mice with PSA-Luc. Furthermore, we show that our noninvasive imaging strategy can be successfully used to image tumor response to androgen ablation in transgenic mice and, as a result, that we can rapidly identify individual animals capable of sustaining tumor growth in the absence of androgen.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16651422
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8975
      1. Author :
        M van Eekelen; LS Sasportas; R Kasmieh; S Yip; J-L Figueiredo; DN Louis; R Weissleder; K Shah
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        brain tumor; glioma; human neural stem cells; TSP-1; endothelial cells; angiogenesis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Novel therapeutic agents combined with innovative modes of delivery and non-invasive imaging of drug delivery, pharmacokinetics and efficacy are crucial in developing effective clinical anticancer therapies. In this study, we have created and characterized multiple novel variants of anti-angiogenic protein thrombospondin (aaTSP-1) that comprises unique regions of three type-I-repeats of TSP-1 and used engineered human neural stem cells (hNSC) to provide sustained on-site delivery of secretable aaTSP-1 to tumor-vasculature. We show that hNSC-aaTSP-1 has anti-angiogenic effect on human brain and dermal microvascular endothelial cells co-cultured with established glioma cells and CD133+ glioma-initiating cells. Using human glioma cells and hNSC engineered with different combinations of fluorescent and bioluminescent marker proteins and employing multi-modality imaging techniques, we show that aaTSP-1 targets the vascular-component of gliomas and a single administration of hNSC-aaTSP-1 markedly reduces tumor vessel-density that results in inhibition of tumor-progression and increased survival in mice bearing highly malignant human gliomas. We also show that therapeutic hNSC do not proliferate and remain in an un-differentiated state in the brains of glioma-bearing mice. This study provides a platform for accelerated development of future cell-based therapies for cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/onc/journal/v29/n22/abs/onc201075a.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4492
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        108
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adoptive Transfer; Animals; Antigen Presentation; Autoantigens; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cancer Vaccines; dendritic cells; Endosomes; Lymphocyte Activation; Lymphoma; Mice; Mice, Knockout; T-Lymphocytes, Helper-Inducer; T-Lymphocytes, Regulatory; Vaccination
      12. Abstract :
        Lymphoma cells are malignant cells of the T- or B-cell lineage that often express many surface markers inappropriately, yet are not recognized as abnormal by the immune system. We modeled this situation by inoculating ovalbumin-expressing E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells into mice that expressed ovalbumin as a self antigen in pancreatic islets, and investigated the efficacy of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination in these mice. Although vaccination with DC-expressing ovalbumin induced strong cytotoxic T-cell immunity, which led to clearance of E.G7-OVA lymphoma cells in naive C57BL/6 mice, DC vaccination was ineffective in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. Antigen modification to increase its processing via the endosomal processing pathway dramatically increased CD4 T-cell activation but paradoxically, impaired the protective effect of DC vaccination even in naive mice. Depletion of CD25(+) T cells (regulatory T cells [Tregs]) prior to vaccination restored the efficacy of DC vaccination and allowed eradication of lymphoma also in mice expressing ovalbumin as a self antigen. We conclude that lymphoma cells may be eradicated using DC vaccination if activation of CD25(+) Tregs is simultaneously inhibited, and that intentionally enhanced endosomal antigen processing in DC vaccines may shift the balance from CD4 T-cell help toward stimulation of Tregs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16621963
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9002
      1. Author :
        Malley, R.; Henneke, P.; Morse, S. C.; Cieslewicz, M. J.; Lipsitch, M.; Thompson, C. M.; Kurt-Jones, E.; Paton, J. C.; Wessels, M. R.; Golenbock, D. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Streptococcus pneumoniae is one of the leading causes of invasive bacterial disease worldwide. Fragments of the cell wall and the cytolytic toxin pneumolysin have been shown to contribute substantially to inflammatory damage, although the interactions between pneumococcal components and host-cell structures have not been elucidated completely. Results of a previous study indicated that cell-wall components of pneumococci are recognized by Toll-like receptor (TLR)2 but suggested that pneumolysin induces inflammatory events independently of this receptor. In this study we tested the hypothesis that pneumolysin interacts with surface proteins of the TLR family other than TLR2. We found that pneumolysin stimulates tumor necrosis factor-? and IL-6 release in wild-type macrophages but not in macrophages from mice with a targeted deletion of the cytoplasmic TLR-adapter molecule myeloid differentiation factor 88, suggesting the involvement of the TLRs in pneumolysin recognition. Purified pneumolysin synergistically activated macrophage responses together with preparations of pneumococcal cell walls or staphylococcal peptidoglycan, which are known to activate TLR2. Furthermore, when compared with wild-type macrophages, macrophages from mice that carry a spontaneous mutation in TLR4 (P712H) were hyporesponsive to both pneumolysin alone and the combination of pneumolysin with pneumococcal cell walls. Finally, these TLR4-mutant mice were significantly more susceptible to lethal infection after intranasal colonization with pneumolysin-positive pneumococci than were control mice. We conclude that the interaction of pneumolysin with TLR4 is critically involved in the innate immune response to pneumococcus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12569171
      14. Call Number :
        140854
      15. Serial :
        7487
      1. Author :
        Mann, B.; Orihuela, C.; Antikainen, J.; Gao, G.; Sublett, J.; Korhonen, T. K.; Tuomanen, E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        Members of the choline binding protein (Cbp) family are noncovalently bound to phosphorylcholine residues on the surface of Streptococcus pneumoniae. It has been suggested that CbpG plays a role in adherence and increase virulence both at the mucosal surface and in the bloodstream, but the function of this protein has been unclear. A new sequence analysis indicated that CbpG is a possible member of the S1 family of multifunctional surface-associated serine proteases. Clinical isolates contained two alleles of cbpG, and one-third of the strains expressed a truncated protein lacking the C-terminal, cell wall-anchoring choline binding domain. CbpG on the surface of pneumococci (full length) or released into the supernatant (truncated) showed proteolytic activity for fibronectin and casein, as did CbpG expressed on lactobacilli or as a purified full-length or truncated recombinant protein. Recombinant CbpG (rCbpG)-coated beads adhered to eukaryotic cells, and TIGR4 mutants lacking CbpG or having a truncated CbpG protein showed decreased adherence in vitro and attenuation of disease in mouse challenge models of colonization, pneumonia, and bacteremia. Immunization with rCbpG was protective in an animal model of colonization and sepsis. We propose that CbpG is a multifunctional surface protein that in the cell-attached or secreted form cleaves host extracellular matrix and in the cell-attached form participates in bacterial adherence. This is the first example of distinct functions in virulence that are dependent on natural variation in expression of a choline binding domain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16428724
      14. Call Number :
        140887
      15. Serial :
        6992
      1. Author :
        Marcella A. Calfon, Claudio Vinegoni, Vasilis Ntziachristos and Farouc A. Jaffer
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Biomedical Optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; Cat K FAST; Cat B FAST; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        New imaging methods are urgently needed to identify high-risk atherosclerotic lesions prior to the onset of myocardial infarction, stroke, and ischemic limbs. Molecular imaging offers a new approach to visualize key biological features that characterize high-risk plaques associated with cardiovascular events. While substantial progress has been realized in clinical molecular imaging of plaques in larger arterial vessels (carotid, aorta, iliac), there remains a compelling, unmet need to develop molecular imaging strategies targeted to high-risk plaques in human coronary arteries. We present recent developments in intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheter-based strategies for in vivo detection of plaque inflammation in coronary-sized arteries. In particular, the biological, light transmission, imaging agent, and engineering principles that underlie a new intravascular near-IR fluorescence sensing method are discussed. Intravascular near-IR fluorescence catheters appear highly translatable to the cardiac catheterization laboratory, and thus may offer a new in vivo method to detect high-risk coronary plaques and to assess novel atherosclerosis biologics.
      13. URL :
        http://spiedl.aip.org/getabs/servlet/GetabsServlet?prog=normal&id=JBOPFO000015000001011107000001&idtype=cvips&gifs=yes&ref=no
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4556
      1. Author :
        Marra, M.; Salzano, G.; Leonetti, C.; Porru, M.; Franco, R.; Zappavigna, S.; Liguori, G.; Botti, G.; Chieffi, P.; Lamberti, M.; Vitale, G.; Abbruzzese, A.; La Rotonda, M. I.; De Rosa, G.; Caraglia, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Biotechnol Adv
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Zoledronic acid (ZOL) is a drug whose potent anti-cancer activity is limited by its short plasma half-life and rapid uptake and accumulation within bone. We have recently proposed new delivery systems to avoid ZOL accumulation into the bone, thus improving extra-skeletal bioavailability. In this work, we have compared the technological and anti-cancer features of either ZOL-containing self-assembly PEGylated nanoparticles (NPs) or ZOL-encapsulating PEGylated liposomes (LIPO-ZOL). ZOL-containing NPs showed superior technological characteristics in terms of mean diameter, size distribution, and ZOL encapsulation efficiency, compared to LIPO-ZOL. Moreover, the anti-cancer activity of NPs in nude mice xenografted with prostate cancer PC3 cells was higher than that one induced by LIPO-ZOL. In addition, NPs induced the complete remission of tumour xenografts and an increase of survival time higher than that one observed with LIPO-ZOL. It has also to be considered that PC3 tumour xenografts were almost completely resistant to the anti-cancer effects induced by free ZOL. Both nanotechnological products did not induce toxic effects not affecting the mice weight nor inducing deaths. Moreover, the histological examination of some vital organs such as liver, kidney and spleen did not find any changes in terms of necrotic effects or modifications in the inflammatory infiltrate. On the other hand, NPs but not LIPO-ZOL caused a statistically significant reduction of the tumour associated macrophages (TAM) in tumour xenografts. This effect was paralleled by a significant increase of both necrotic and apoptotic indexes. The effects of the NPs were also higher in terms of neo-angiogenesis inhibition. These results suggest the future preclinical development of ZOL-encapsulating NPs in the treatment of human cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21741464
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10488
      1. Author :
        Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Auvinen, Kaisa; Elima, Kati; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Salmi, Marko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        69
      8. Issue :
        19
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Antigens, CD11b; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Growth Processes; Female; Lymphoma; Male; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Myeloid Cells; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Oxidoreductases; Receptors, Chemokine
      12. Abstract :
        Cancer growth is regulated by several nonmalignant cell types, such as leukocytes and endothelial cells, which reside in the stroma of the tumor. Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an amine oxidase enzyme that is expressed on the surface of endothelial cells. It supports leukocyte traffic into inflamed tissues, but nothing is known about its possible role in cancer biology in vivo. Here, we report that B16 melanoma and EL-4 lymphoma remain smaller in VAP-1-deficient mice than in wild-type controls. We found an unexpected defect in tumor angiogenesis in the absence of VAP-1. VAP-1 also selectively enhanced the recruitment of Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells into the tumors. Generation of mice expressing enzymatically inactive VAP-1 showed that the oxidase activity of VAP-1 was necessary to support neoangiogenesis, myeloid cell recruitment, and tumor growth in vivo. These data describe VAP-1 as the first adhesion molecule known to be involved in the recruitment of Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells into tumors. They also suggest that VAP-1 is a potential new tool for immunotherapy of tumors that could be exploited to reduce tumor burden by controlling the traffic of Gr-1+CD11b+ myeloid cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19789345
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8997
      1. Author :
        Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Castermans, Karolien; Auvinen, Kaisa; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Griffioen, Arjan W; Salmi, Marko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adjuvants, Immunologic; Allylamine; Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Antibodies, Blocking; Antibodies, Monoclonal; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Migration Inhibition; Enzyme Inhibitors; Female; Growth Inhibitors; Lymphoma, T-Cell; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Myeloid Cells; Semicarbazides
      12. Abstract :
        Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial, cell surface-expressed oxidase involved in leukocyte traffic. The adhesive function of VAP-1 can be blocked by anti-VAP-1 Abs and small-molecule inhibitors. However, the effects of VAP-1 blockade on antitumor immunity and tumor progression are unknown. In this paper, we used anti-VAP-1 mAbs and small-molecule inhibitors of VAP-1 in B16 melanoma and EL-4 lymphoma tumor models in C57BL/6 mice. Leukocyte accumulation into tumors and neoangiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and intravital videomicroscopy. We found that both anti-VAP-1 Abs and VAP-1 inhibitors reduced the number of leukocytes in the tumors, but they targeted partially different leukocyte subpopulations. Anti-VAP-1 Abs selectively inhibited infiltration of CD8-positive lymphocytes into tumors and had no effect on accumulation of myeloid cells into tumors. In contrast, the VAP-1 inhibitors significantly reduced only the number of proangiogenic Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in melanomas and lymphomas. Blocking of VAP-1 by either means left tumor homing of regulatory T cells and type 2 immune-suppressing monocytes/macrophages intact. Notably, VAP-1 inhibitors, but not anti-VAP-1 Abs, retarded the growth of melanomas and lymphomas and reduced tumor neoangiogenesis. The VAP-1 inhibitors also reduced the binding of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells to the tumor vasculature. We conclude that tumors use the catalytic activity of VAP-1 to recruit myeloid cells into tumors and to support tumor progression. Small-molecule VAP-1 inhibitors therefore might be a potential new tool for immunotherapy of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20154208
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8996
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