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      1. Author :
        Liu, R.; Gilmore, D. M.; Zubris, K. A.; Xu, X.; Catalano, P. J.; Padera, R. F.; Grinstaff, M. W.; Colson, Y. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        34
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H2Ln, D3H2Ln, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Although breast cancer patients with localized disease exhibit an excellent long-term prognosis, up to 40% of patients treated with local resection alone may harbor occult nodal metastatic disease leading to increased locoregional recurrence and decreased survival. Given the potential for targeted drug delivery to result in more efficacious locoregional control with less morbidity, the current study assessed the ability of drug-loaded polymeric expansile nanoparticles (eNP) to migrate from the site of tumor to regional lymph nodes, locally deliver a chemotherapeutic payload, and prevent primary tumor growth as well as lymph node metastases. Expansile nanoparticles entered tumor cells and paclitaxel-loaded eNP (Pax-eNP) exhibited dose-dependent cytotoxicity in vitro and significantly decreased tumor doubling time in vivo against human triple negative breast cancer in both microscopic and established murine breast cancer models. Furthermore, migration of Pax-eNP to axillary lymph nodes resulted in higher intranodal paclitaxel concentrations and a significantly lower incidence of lymph node metastases. These findings demonstrate that lymphatic migration of drug-loaded eNP provides regionally targeted delivery of chemotherapy to both decrease local tumor growth and strategically prevent the development of nodal metastases within the regional tumor-draining lymph node basin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23228419
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10506
      1. Author :
        Liu, W. F.; Ma, M.; Bratlie, K. M.; Dang, T. T.; Langer, R.; Anderson, D. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense, IVIS, Animals; Biocompatible Materials/*adverse effects; Cells, Cultured; Free Radicals/metabolism; Immunohistochemistry; Male; Mice; Prostheses and Implants/*adverse effects; Reactive Oxygen Species/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The non-specific host response to implanted biomaterials is often a key challenge of medical device design. To evaluate biocompatibility, measuring the release of reactive oxygen species (ROS) produced by inflammatory cells in response to biomaterial surfaces is a well-established method. However, the detection of ROS in response to materials implanted in vivo has not yet been demonstrated. Here, we develop a bioluminescence whole animal imaging approach to observe ROS released in response to subcutaneously-implanted materials in live animals. We compared the real-time generation of ROS in response to two representative materials, polystyrene and alginate, over the course of 28 days. High levels of ROS were observed near polystyrene, but not alginate implants, and persisted throughout the course of 28 days. Histological analysis revealed that high levels of ROS correlated not only with the presence of phagocytic cells at early timepoints, but also fibrosis at later timepoints, suggesting that ROS may be involved in both the acute and chronic phase of the foreign body response. These data are the first in vivo demonstration of ROS generation in response to implanted materials, and describe a novel technique to evaluate the host response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21146868
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10428
      1. Author :
        Liu, W.; McDaniel, J.; Li, X.; Asai, D.; Quiroz, F. G.; Schaal, J.; Park, J. S.; Zalutsky, M.; Chilkoti, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc2, PC3M-luc2, IVIS, Prostate Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Brachytherapy is a common clinical technique involving implantation of sealed radioactive “seeds” within a tumor to selectively irradiate the tumor mass while minimizing systemic toxicity. To mitigate the disadvantages associated with complex surgical implantation and subsequent device removal procedures, we have developed an alternative approach using a genetically encoded peptide polymer solution composed of a thermally responsive elastin-like polypeptide (ELP) radiolabeled with (131)I that self-assembles into radionuclide seeds upon intratumoral injection. The formation of these nontoxic and biodegradable polymer seeds led to prolonged intratumoral retention (~85% ID/tumor 7 days postinjection) of the radionuclide, elicited a tumor growth delay in 100% of the tumors in two human xenografts (FaDu and PC-3), and cured more than 67% of tumor-bearing animals after a single administration of labeled ELP. These results suggest that in situ self-assembly of biodegradable and injectable radionuclide-containing polypeptide seeds could be a promising therapeutic alternative to conventional brachytherapy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23155121
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10487
      1. Author :
        Lorentzen, D.; Durairaj, L.; Pezzulo, A. A.; Nakano, Y.; Launspach, J.; Stoltz, D. A.; Zamba, G.; McCray, P. B., Jr.; Zabner, J.; Welsh, M. J.; Nauseef, W. M.; Banfi, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Free Radic Biol Med
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen8.1, Xen 8.1, S. aureus, IVIS, bioluminescence imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A recently discovered enzyme system produces antibacterial hypothiocyanite (OSCN(-)) in the airway lumen by oxidizing the secreted precursor thiocyanate (SCN(-)). Airway epithelial cultures have been shown to secrete SCN(-) in a CFTR-dependent manner. Thus, reduced SCN(-) availability in the airway might contribute to the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF), a disease caused by mutations in the CFTR gene and characterized by an airway host defense defect. We tested this hypothesis by analyzing the SCN(-) concentration in the nasal airway surface liquid (ASL) of CF patients and non-CF subjects and in the tracheobronchial ASL of CFTR-DeltaF508 homozygous pigs and control littermates. In the nasal ASL, the SCN(-) concentration was ~30-fold higher than in serum independent of the CFTR mutation status of the human subject. In the tracheobronchial ASL of CF pigs, the SCN(-) concentration was somewhat reduced. Among human subjects, SCN(-) concentrations in the ASL varied from person to person independent of CFTR expression, and CF patients with high SCN(-) levels had better lung function than those with low SCN(-) levels. Thus, although CFTR can contribute to SCN(-) transport, it is not indispensable for the high SCN(-) concentration in ASL. The correlation between lung function and SCN(-) concentration in CF patients may reflect a beneficial role for SCN(-).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21334431
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10564
      1. Author :
        Lorenz, U.; Schafer, T.; Ohlsen, K.; Tiurbe, G. C.; Buhler, C.; Germer, C. T.; Kellersmann, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Vasc Endovasc Surg
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        41
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Acetates; Animals; *Biofilms; Bioprosthesis; Blood Vessel Prosthesis/*microbiology; Cattle; Colony Count, Microbial; Luminescent Measurements/*methods; Mice; Microbial Viability; Pericardium; *Photons; Polyesters; Polytetrafluoroethylene; Prospective Studies; Prosthesis-Related Infections/*diagnosis; Random Allocation; Silver Compounds; Staphylococcus aureus/isolation & purification/*physiology
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES: Biophotonic imaging was compared to standard enumeration method both for counting Staphylococcus aureus in biofilm and bacterial susceptibility tests of different graft materials. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized, controlled animal study. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Five types of vascular grafts were placed subcutaneously in 35 mice and challenged with bioluminescent S. aureus. The mice were divided into equal groups as follows: group A (polyester), group B (polytetrafluoroethylene), group C and D (two types of silver acetate-coated polyester) and group E (bovine pericardium). Controls were given only the bacteria. The bioluminescence signal of S. aureus, able to predict number of viable bacteria in biofilm without any manipulation, was measured at different time points. Five days postinfection, regular cultures of adherent bacteria on grafts were obtained. Comparative analyses between bioluminescence activity and culture enumeration were performed. RESULTS: The number of viable bacteria on silver-coated prostheses was the slightest, indicating superior bacterial resistance. The density of bacteria on polytetrafluoroethylene and polyester was comparable, with a non-significant advantage for polytetrafluoroethylene. Moreover, bioluminescence detected the number of viable S. aureus in biofilm more exactly compared to enumeration of bacteria. CONCLUSION: Bioluminescence imaging can be considered a useful tool to characterize susceptibility of any graft material to bacterial biofilm prior to implantation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20943422
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10453
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Microbes and infection / Institut Pasteur
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        10
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacterial Proteins; Biofilms; Bioware; Catheterization, Central Venous; Male; Mice; Point Mutation; Sigma Factor; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Virulence; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The impact of the alternative sigma factor sigma B (SigB) on pathogenesis of Staphylococcus aureus is not conclusively clarified. In this study, a central venous catheter (CVC) related model of multiorgan infection was used to investigate the role of SigB for the pathogenesis of S. aureus infections and biofilm formation in vivo. Analysis of two SigB-positive wild-type strains and their isogenic mutants revealed uniformly that the wild-type was significantly more virulent than the SigB-deficient mutant. The observed difference in virulence was apparently not linked to the capability of the strains to form biofilms in vivo since wild-type and mutant strains were able to produce biofilm layers inside of the catheter. The data strongly indicate that the alternative sigma factor SigB plays a role in CVC-associated infections caused by S. aureus.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18328762
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9046
      1. Author :
        Lu, Z.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Kurup, D. B.; Tegos, G. P.; Jahnke, A.; Wharton, T.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Nanomedicine (Lond)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5, Animals; Fullerenes/*chemistry; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Photochemotherapy/*methods; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemistry; Pseudomonas Infections/*drug therapy; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects; Wound Infection/*drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: Fullerenes are under intensive study for potential biomedical applications. We have previously reported that a C60 fullerene functionalized with three dimethylpyrrolidinium groups (BF6) is a highly active broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer in vitro when combined with white-light illumination. We asked whether this high degree of in vitro activity would translate into an in vivo therapeutic effect in two potentially lethal mouse models of infected wounds. MATERIALS & METHODS: We used stable bioluminescent bacteria and a low light imaging system to follow the progress of the infection noninvasively in real time. An excisional wound on the mouse back was contaminated with one of two bioluminescent Gram-negative species, Proteus mirabilis (2.5 x 10(7) cells) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(6) cells). A solution of BF6 was placed into the wound followed by delivery of up to 180 J/cm(2) of broadband white light (400-700 nm). RESULTS: In both cases there was a light-dose-dependent reduction of bioluminescence from the wound not observed in control groups (light alone or BF6 alone). Fullerene-mediated photodynamic therapy of mice infected with P. mirabilis led to 82% survival compared with 8% survival without treatment (p < 0.001). Photodynamic therapy of mice infected with highly virulent P. aeruginosa did not lead to survival, but when photodynamic therapy was combined with a suboptimal dose of the antibiotic tobramycin (6 mg/kg for 1 day) there was a synergistic therapeutic effect with a survival of 60% compared with a survival of 20% with tobramycin alone (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that cationic fullerenes have clinical potential as an antimicrobial photosensitizer for superficial infections where red light is not needed to penetrate tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21143031
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10390
      1. Author :
        Lu, Z.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Kurup, D. B.; Tegos, G. P.; Jahnke, A.; Wharton, T.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Nanomedicine (Lond)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen44, Xen 44, Proteus mirabilis, bioluminescence imaging, Animals; Fullerenes/*chemistry; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Photochemotherapy/*methods; Photosensitizing Agents/*chemistry; Pseudomonas Infections/*drug therapy; Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects; Wound Infection/*drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        AIMS: Fullerenes are under intensive study for potential biomedical applications. We have previously reported that a C60 fullerene functionalized with three dimethylpyrrolidinium groups (BF6) is a highly active broad-spectrum antimicrobial photosensitizer in vitro when combined with white-light illumination. We asked whether this high degree of in vitro activity would translate into an in vivo therapeutic effect in two potentially lethal mouse models of infected wounds. MATERIALS & METHODS: We used stable bioluminescent bacteria and a low light imaging system to follow the progress of the infection noninvasively in real time. An excisional wound on the mouse back was contaminated with one of two bioluminescent Gram-negative species, Proteus mirabilis (2.5 x 10(7) cells) and Pseudomonas aeruginosa (5 x 10(6) cells). A solution of BF6 was placed into the wound followed by delivery of up to 180 J/cm(2) of broadband white light (400-700 nm). RESULTS: In both cases there was a light-dose-dependent reduction of bioluminescence from the wound not observed in control groups (light alone or BF6 alone). Fullerene-mediated photodynamic therapy of mice infected with P. mirabilis led to 82% survival compared with 8% survival without treatment (p < 0.001). Photodynamic therapy of mice infected with highly virulent P. aeruginosa did not lead to survival, but when photodynamic therapy was combined with a suboptimal dose of the antibiotic tobramycin (6 mg/kg for 1 day) there was a synergistic therapeutic effect with a survival of 60% compared with a survival of 20% with tobramycin alone (p < 0.01). CONCLUSION: These data suggest that cationic fullerenes have clinical potential as an antimicrobial photosensitizer for superficial infections where red light is not needed to penetrate tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21143031
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10563
      1. Author :
        Luis Rodriguez-Menocal1, Yuntao Wei1, Si M. Pham, Melissa St-Pierre, Sen Li, Keith Webster, Pascal Goldschmidt-Clermont and Roberto I. Vazquez-Padron
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Atherosclerosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        209
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In-stent restenosis; Mouse; Stent; Animal model; in vivo imaging; MMPSense FAST; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Background and aims: In-stent restenosis (ISR) is the major complication that occurs after percutaneous coronary interventions to facilitate coronary revascularization. Herein we described a simple and cost-effective model, which reproduces important features of ISR in the mouse.

        Methods and results: Microvascular bare metal stents were successfully implanted in the abdominal aorta of atherosclerotic ApoE-null mice. Patency of implanted stents was interrogated using ultrasound biomicroscopy. Aortas were harvested at different time points after implantation and processed for histopathological analysis. Thrombus formation was histologically detected after 1 day. Leukocyte adherence and infiltration were evident after 7 days and decreased thereafter. Neointimal formation, neointimal thickness and luminal stenosis simultaneously increased up to 28 days after stent implantation. Using multichannel fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) for spatiotemporal resolution of MMP activities, we observed that MMP activity in the stented aorta of Apo-E null mice was 2-fold higher than that of wild-type mice. Finally, we compared neointimal formation in response to stenting in two genetically different mouse strains. In-stent neointimas in FVB/NJ mice were 2-fold thicker than in C57BL/6J mice (p=0.002).

        Conclusion: We have developed a model that can take advantage of the multiple genetic resources available for the mouse to study the mechanisms of in-stent restenosis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.atherosclerosis-journal.com/article/S0021-9150(09)00825-9/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4555
      1. Author :
        Luker, G.D.; Luker, K.E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Nuclear Medicine: Official Publication, Society of Nuclear Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Clinical Medicine; Contrast Media; Diagnostic Imaging; Fluorescence; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; in vivo; in vivo imaging; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasms; Optics and Photonics; Peptide Hydrolases; Rats; Signal Transduction; Software; Tomography, Optical
      12. Abstract :
        Optical techniques, such as bioluminescence and fluorescence, are emerging as powerful new modalities for molecular imaging in disease and therapy. Combining innovative molecular biology and chemistry, researchers have developed optical methods for imaging a variety of cellular and molecular processes in vivo, including protein interactions, protein degradation, and protease activity. Whereas optical imaging has been used primarily for research in small-animal models, there are several areas in which optical molecular imaging will translate to clinical medicine. In this review, we summarize recent advances in optical techniques for molecular imaging and the potential impact for clinical medicine.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18077528
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 7444
      15. Serial :
        4477
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