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      1. Author :
        Kozlowski, C.; Weimer, R. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        7
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Antigens, CD/metabolism; Antigens, Differentiation, Myelomonocytic/metabolism; Calcium-Binding Proteins/metabolism; Central Nervous System/metabolism; Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Immunohistochemistry/*methods; Lipopolysaccharides/pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Transgenic; Microfilament Proteins/metabolism; Microglia/cytology/drug effects/*metabolism; Microscopy, Confocal/*methods; Receptors, Cytokine/genetics/metabolism; Receptors, HIV/genetics/metabolism; Reproducibility of Results
      12. Abstract :
        Microglia are specialized immune cells of the brain. Upon insult, microglia initiate a cascade of cellular responses including a characteristic change in cell morphology. To study the dynamics of microglia immune response in situ, we developed an automated image analysis method that enables the quantitative assessment of microglia activation state within tissue based solely on cell morphology. Per cell morphometric analysis of fluorescently labeled microglia is achieved through local iterative threshold segmentation, which reduces errors caused by signal-to-noise variation across large volumes. We demonstrate, utilizing systemic application of lipopolysaccharide as a model of immune challenge, that several morphological parameters, including cell perimeter length, cell roundness and soma size, quantitatively distinguish resting versus activated populations of microglia within tissue comparable to traditional immunohistochemistry methods. Furthermore, we provide proof-of-concept data that monitoring soma size enables the longitudinal assessment of microglia activation in the mouse neocortex imaged via 2-photon in vivo microscopy. The ability to quantify microglia activation automatically by shape alone allows unbiased and rapid analysis of both fixed and in vivo central nervous system tissue.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22457705
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10435
      1. Author :
        Krespi, Y. P.; Kizhner, V.; Nistico, L.; Hall-Stoodley, L.; Stoodley, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Am J Otolaryngol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Biofilms/drug effects/*radiation effects; Ciprofloxacin/*pharmacology; Culture Media; High-Energy Shock Waves; Humans; *Laser Therapy, Low-Level; Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus/*growth &; development/physiology/*radiation effects; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Reference Values; Sensitivity and Specificity; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The aim of the study was to study the efficacy of 2 different lasers in vitro, in disrupting biofilm and killing planktonic pathogenic bacteria. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Biofilms of a stable bioluminescent of Staphylococcus aureus Xen 31 were grown in a 96-well microtiter plate for 3 days. The study included 7 arms: (a) control; (b) ciprofloxacin (3 mg/L, the established minimum inhibitory concentration [MIC]) alone; (c) shock wave (SW) laser alone; (d) near-infrared (NIR) laser alone; (e) SW laser and ciprofloxacin; (f) SW and NIR lasers; (g) SW, NIR lasers, and ciprofloxacin. The results were evaluated with an in vivo imaging system (IVIS) biophotonic system (for live bacteria) and optical density (OD) for total bacteria. RESULTS: Without antibiotics, there was a 43% reduction in OD (P < .05) caused by the combination of SW and NIR suggesting that biofilm had been disrupted. There was an 88% reduction (P < .05) in live biofilm. Ciprofloxacin alone resulted in a decrease of 28% of total live cells (biofilm remaining attached) and 58% of biofilm cells (both P > .05). Ciprofloxacin in combination with SW and SW + NIR lasers caused a decrease of more than 60% in total live biomass and more than 80% of biofilm cells, which was significantly greater than ciprofloxacin alone (P < .05). CONCLUSIONS: We have demonstrated an effective nonpharmacologic treatment method for methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) biofilm disruption and killing using 2 different lasers. The preferred treatment sequence is a SW laser disruption of biofilm followed by NIR laser illumination. Treatment optimization of biofilm is possible with the addition of ciprofloxacin in concentrations consistent with planktonic MIC.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20434806
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10554
      1. Author :
        Kristof Schutters and Chris Reutelingsperger
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Apoptosis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Apoptosis; Phosphatidylserine; Annexin A5; Molecular Imaging; Targeted Drug Delivery; in vivo imaging; FMT; fluorescence molecular tomography; Annexin-Vivo
      12. Abstract :
        Cells are able to execute apoptosis by activating series of specific biochemical reactions. One of the most prominent characteristics of cell death is the externalization of phosphatidylserine (PS), which in healthy cells resides predominantly in the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane. These features have made PS-externalization a well-explored phenomenon to image cell death for diagnostic purposes. In addition, it was demonstrated that under certain conditions viable cells express PS at their surface such as endothelial cells of tumor blood vessels, stressed tumor cells and hypoxic cardiomyocytes. Hence, PS has become a potential target for therapeutic strategies aiming at Targeted Drug Delivery. In this review we highlight the biomarker PS and various PS-binding compounds that have been employed to target PS for diagnostic purposes. We emphasize the 35 kD human protein annexin A5, that has been developed as a Molecular Imaging agent to measure cell death in vitro, and non-invasively in vivo in animal models and in patients with cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Recently focus has shifted from diagnostic towards therapeutic applications employing annexin A5 in strategies to deliver drugs to cells that express PS at their surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2929432/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4562
      1. Author :
        Kuklin, Nelly A; Clark, Desmond J; Secore, Susan; Cook, James; Cope, Leslie D; McNeely, Tessie; Noble, Liliane; Brown, Martha J; Zorman, Julie K; Wang, Xin Min; Pancari, Gregory; Fan, Hongxia; Isett, Kevin; Burgess, Bruce; Bryan, Janine; Brownlow, Michelle; George, Hugh; Meinz, Maria; Liddell, Mary E; Kelly, Rosemarie; Schultz, Loren; Montgomery, Donna; Onishi, Janet; Losada, Maria; Martin, Melissa; Ebert, Timothy; Tan, Charles Y; Schofield, Timothy L; Nagy, Eszter; Meineke, Andreas; Joyce, Joseph G; Kurtz, Myra B; Caulfield, Michael J; Jansen, Kathrin U; McClements, William; Anderson, Annaliesa S
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        74
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antibodies, Bacterial; Antigens, Bacterial; Bioware; Cation Transport Proteins; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Macaca mulatta; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Inbred ICR; Sepsis; Sequence Homology, Amino Acid; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Survival Rate; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcus aureus is a major cause of nosocomial infections worldwide, and the rate of resistance to clinically relevant antibiotics, such as methicillin, is increasing; furthermore, there has been an increase in the number of methicillin-resistant S. aureus community-acquired infections. Effective treatment and prevention strategies are urgently needed. We investigated the potential of the S. aureus surface protein iron surface determinant B (IsdB) as a prophylactic vaccine against S. aureus infection. IsdB is an iron-sequestering protein that is conserved in diverse S. aureus clinical isolates, both methicillin resistant and methicillin sensitive, and it is expressed on the surface of all isolates tested. The vaccine was highly immunogenic in mice when it was formulated with amorphous aluminum hydroxyphosphate sulfate adjuvant, and the resulting antibody responses were associated with reproducible and significant protection in animal models of infection. The specificity of the protective immune responses in mice was demonstrated by using an S. aureus strain deficient for IsdB and HarA, a protein with a high level of identity to IsdB. We also demonstrated that IsdB is highly immunogenic in rhesus macaques, inducing a more-than-fivefold increase in antibody titers after a single immunization. Based on the data presented here, IsdB has excellent prospects for use as a vaccine against S. aureus disease in humans.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16552052
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9989
      1. Author :
        Kuklin, Nelly A; Pancari, Gregory D; Tobery, Timothy W; Cope, Leslie; Jackson, Jesse; Gill, Charles; Overbye, Karen; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Montgomery, Donna; Anderson, Annaliesa S; McClements, William; Jansen, Kathrin U
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        47
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Abscess; Acetamides; Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Catheterization; Colony Count, Microbial; Dose-Response Relationship, Drug; Female; Foreign Bodies; Luminescent Measurements; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Muscle, Skeletal; Oxazolidinones; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Thigh; Time Factors; Wound Infection; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        Staphylococcal infections associated with catheter and prosthetic implants are difficult to eradicate and often lead to chronic infections. Development of novel antibacterial therapies requires simple, reliable, and relevant models for infection. Using bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus, we have adapted the existing foreign-body and deep-wound mouse models of staphylococcal infection to allow real-time monitoring of the bacterial colonization of catheters or tissues. This approach also enables kinetic measurements of bacterial growth and clearance in each infected animal. Persistence of infection was observed throughout the course of the study until termination of the experiment at day 16 in a deep-wound model and day 21 in the foreign-body model, providing sufficient time to test the effects of antibacterial compounds. The usefulness of both animal models was assessed by using linezolid as a test compound and comparing bioluminescent measurements to bacterial counts. In the foreign-body model, a three-dose antibiotic regimen (2, 5, and 24 h after infection) resulted in a decrease in both luminescence and bacterial counts recovered from the implant compared to those of the mock-treated infected mice. In addition, linezolid treatment prevented the formation of subcutaneous abscesses, although it did not completely resolve the infection. In the thigh model, the same treatment regimen resulted in complete resolution of the luminescent signal, which correlated with clearance of the bacteria from the thighs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12936968
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9992
      1. Author :
        Kuo, Chaincy; Coquoz, Olivier; Troy, Tamara L; Xu, Heng; Rice, Brad W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biomedical optics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Imaging, Three-Dimensional; Luminescent Proteins; Male; Mice; Microscopy, Fluorescence, Multiphoton; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms; Whole Body Imaging
      12. Abstract :
        A new method is described for obtaining a 3-D reconstruction of a bioluminescent light source distribution inside a living animal subject, from multispectral images of the surface light emission acquired on charge-coupled device (CCD) camera. The method uses the 3-D surface topography of the animal, which is obtained from a structured light illumination technique. The forward model of photon transport is based on the diffusion approximation in homogeneous tissue with a local planar boundary approximation for each mesh element, allowing rapid calculation of the forward Green's function kernel. Absorption and scattering properties of tissue are measured a priori as input to the algorithm. By using multispectral images, 3-D reconstructions of luminescent sources can be derived from images acquired from only a single view. As a demonstration, the reconstruction technique is applied to determine the location and brightness of a source embedded in a homogeneous phantom subject in the shape of a mouse. The technique is then evaluated with real mouse models in which calibrated sources are implanted at known locations within living tissue. Finally, reconstructions are demonstrated in a PC3M-luc (prostate tumor line) metastatic tumor model in nude mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17477722
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8968
      1. Author :
        Kwong, G. A.; von Maltzahn, G.; Murugappan, G.; Abudayyeh, O.; Mo, S.; Papayannopoulos, I. A.; Sverdlov, D. Y.; Liu, S. B.; Warren, A. D.; Popov, Y.; Schuppan, D.; Bhatia, S. N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Biotechnol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        VivoTag, IVIS, Vivotag
      12. Abstract :
        Biomarkers are becoming increasingly important in the clinical management of complex diseases, yet our ability to discover new biomarkers remains limited by our dependence on endogenous molecules. Here we describe the development of exogenously administered 'synthetic biomarkers' composed of mass-encoded peptides conjugated to nanoparticles that leverage intrinsic features of human disease and physiology for noninvasive urinary monitoring. These protease-sensitive agents perform three functions in vivo: they target sites of disease, sample dysregulated protease activities and emit mass-encoded reporters into host urine for multiplexed detection by mass spectrometry. Using mouse models of liver fibrosis and cancer, we show that these agents can noninvasively monitor liver fibrosis and resolution without the need for invasive core biopsies and substantially improve early detection of cancer compared with current clinically used blood biomarkers. This approach of engineering synthetic biomarkers for multiplexed urinary monitoring should be broadly amenable to additional pathophysiological processes and point-of-care diagnostics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23242163
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10567
      1. Author :
        Lambrechts, Saskia A G; Demidova, Tatiana N; Aalders, Maurice C G; Hasan, Tayyaba; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Burns; Mice; Photochemotherapy; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen8.1
      12. Abstract :
        The rise of multiply antibiotic resistant bacteria has led to searches for novel antimicrobial therapies to treat infections. Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is a potential candidate; it uses the combination of a photosensitizer with visible light to produce reactive oxygen species that lead to cell death. We used PDT mediated by meso-mono-phenyl-tri(N-methyl-4-pyridyl)-porphyrin (PTMPP) to treat burn wounds in mice with established Staphylococcus aureus infections The third degree burn wounds were infected with bioluminescent S. aureus. PDT was applied after one day of bacterial growth by adding a 25% DMSO/500 microM PTMPP solution to the wound followed by illumination with red light and periodic imaging of the mice using a sensitive camera to detect the bioluminescence. More than 98% of the bacteria were eradicated after a light dose of 210 J cm(-2) in the presence of PTMPP. However, bacterial re-growth was observed. Light alone or PDT both delayed the wound healing. These data suggest that PDT has the potential to rapidly reduce the bacterial load in infected burns. The treatment needs to be optimized to reduce wound damage and prevent recurrence.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15986057
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9993
      1. Author :
        Lamppa, J. W.; Ackerman, M. E.; Lai, J. I.; Scanlon, T. C.; Griswold, K. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen 5, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5
      12. Abstract :
        Alginate lyase enzymes represent prospective biotherapeutic agents for treating bacterial infections, particularly in the cystic fibrosis airway. To effectively deimmunize one therapeutic candidate while maintaining high level catalytic proficiency, a combined genetic engineering-PEGylation strategy was implemented. Rationally designed, site-specific PEGylation variants were constructed by orthogonal maleimide-thiol coupling chemistry. In contrast to random PEGylation of the enzyme by NHS-ester mediated chemistry, controlled mono-PEGylation of A1-III alginate lyase produced a conjugate that maintained wild type levels of activity towards a model substrate. Significantly, the PEGylated variant exhibited enhanced solution phase kinetics with bacterial alginate, the ultimate therapeutic target. The immunoreactivity of the PEGylated enzyme was compared to a wild type control using in vitro binding studies with both enzyme-specific antibodies, from immunized New Zealand white rabbits, and a single chain antibody library, derived from a human volunteer. In both cases, the PEGylated enzyme was found to be substantially less immunoreactive. Underscoring the enzyme's potential for practical utility, >90% of adherent, mucoid, Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms were removed from abiotic surfaces following a one hour treatment with the PEGylated variant, whereas the wild type enzyme removed only 75% of biofilms in parallel studies. In aggregate, these results demonstrate that site-specific mono-PEGylation of genetically engineered A1-III alginate lyase yielded an enzyme with enhanced performance relative to therapeutically relevant metrics.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21340021
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10388
      1. Author :
        Las Heras, F.; DaCosta, R. S.; Pritzker, K. P.; Haroon, N.; Netchev, G.; Tsui, H. W.; Chiu, B.; Erwin, W. M.; Tsui, F. W.; Inman, R. D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis Res Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Axis/chemistry/*metabolism/*pathology; *Calcification, Physiologic/genetics; Inflammation/genetics/metabolism/prevention & control; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Molecular Imaging/*methods; Spondylitis, Ankylosing/diagnosis/*genetics/*metabolism; Time Factors
      12. Abstract :
        INTRODUCTION: The diagnosis of ankylosing spondylitis is made from a combination of clinical features and the presence of radiographic evidence that may be detected only after many years of inflammatory back pain. It is not uncommon to have a diagnosis confirmed 5 to 10 years after the initial onset of symptoms. Development of a more-sensitive molecular imaging technology to detect structural changes in the joints would lead to earlier diagnosis and quantitative tracking of ankylosis progression. Progressive ankylosis (ank/ank) mice have a loss of function in the Ank gene, which codes for a regulator of PPi transport. In this study, we used these ank/ank mutant mice to assess a noninvasive, quantitative measure of joint ankylosis with near-infrared (NIR) molecular imaging in vivo. METHODS: Three age groups (8, 12, and 18 weeks) of ank/ank (15 mice) and wild-type littermates (12 +/+ mice) were assessed histologically and radiographically. Before imaging, OsteoSense 750 (bisphosphonate pamidronate) was injected i.v. Whole-body images were analyzed by using the multispectral Maestro imaging system. RESULTS: OsteoSense 750 signals in the paw joints were higher in ank/ank mice in all three age groups compared with controls. In the spine, significantly higher OsteoSense 750 signals were detected early, in 8-week-old ank/ank mice compared with controls, although minimal radiographic differences were noted at this time point. The molecular imaging changes in the ank/ank spine (8 weeks) were supported by histologic changes, including calcium apatite crystals at the edge of the vertebral bodies and new syndesmophyte formation. CONCLUSIONS: Changes in joint pathology of ank/ank mice, as evaluated by histologic and radiographic means, are qualitative, but only semiquantitative. In contrast, molecular imaging provides a quantitative assessment. Ankylosis in ank/ank mice developed simultaneously in distal and axial joints, contrary to the previous notion that it is a centripetal process. NIR imaging might be feasible for early disease diagnosis and for monitoring disease progression in ankylosing spondylitis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21992149
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10471
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