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      1. Author :
        Kenneth M. Kozloff, Luisa Quinti, Somying Patntirapong, Peter V. Hauschka, Ching-Hsuan Tung, Ralph Weissleder and Umar Mahmood
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; bone; osteoclast; cathepsin K; non-invasive imaging; molecular imaging; fluorescence; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient.
      13. URL :
        http://www.thebonejournal.com/article/S8756-3282(08)00816-8/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4526
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Adams, C. S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        55
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Bacterial Adhesion/drug effects; Biofilms/drug effects/growth & development; *Bone Transplantation; Bone and Bones/*chemistry/*microbiology; Cell Adhesion/drug effects; Cell Line; Colony Count, Microbial; Humans; Microscopy, Confocal; Osteoblasts/cytology; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/*growth & development/physiology; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Infection is an important medical problem associated with the use of bone allografts. To retard bacterial colonization, we have recently reported on the modification of bone allografts with the antibiotic vancomycin (VAN). In this report, we examine the ability of this antibiotic-modified allograft to resist bacterial colonization and biofilm formation. When antibiotic was coupled to the allograft, a uniform distribution of the antibiotic was apparent. Following challenges with Staphylococcus aureus for 6 h, the covalently bonded VAN decreased colonization as a function of inoculum, ranging from 0.8 to 2.0 log(10) CFU. Furthermore, the VAN-modified surface resisted biofilm formation, even in topographical niches that provide a protected environment for bacterial adhesion. Attachment of the antibiotic to the allograft surface was robust, and the bonded VAN was stable whether incubated in aqueous media or in air, maintaining levels of 75 to 100% of initial levels over 60 days. While the VAN-modified allograft inhibited the Gram-positive S. aureus colonization, in keeping with VAN's spectrum of activity, the VAN-modified allograft was readily colonized by the Gram-negative Escherichia coli. Finally, initial toxicity measures indicated that the VAN-modified allograft did not influence osteoblast colonization or viability. Since the covalently tethered antibiotic is stable, is active, retains its specificity, and does not exhibit toxicity, it is concluded that this modified allograft holds great promise for decreasing bone graft-associated infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21098245
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10408
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, C.; Barr, S.; Shapiro, I. M.; Parvizi, J.; Adams, C. S.; Hickok, N. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Adsorption/drug effects; Anti-Bacterial Agents/chemistry/*pharmacology; Biological Markers/metabolism; *Bone Transplantation; Cell Differentiation/drug effects; Cell Shape/drug effects; Cells, Cultured; Colony Count, Microbial; Drug Stability; Fetus/cytology; Fluorescence; Gene Expression Profiling; Humans; Microbial Sensitivity Tests; Osteoblasts/cytology/drug effects/metabolism; Phenotype; Time Factors; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Bacterial contamination of bone allograft is a significant complication of orthopedic surgery. To address this issue, we have engineered a method for covalently modifying bone allograft tissue with the antibiotic vancomycin. The goal of this investigation was to compare the biocidal properties of this new allograft material with those of vancomycin physisorbed onto graft material. The duration of antibiotic release from the vancomycin-modified allograft matrix was determined, and no elution was observed. In contrast, the adsorbed antibiotic showed a peak elution at 24h that then decreased over several days. We next used an Staphylococcus aureus disk diffusion assay to measure the activity of the eluted vancomycin. Again we found that no active antibiotic was eluted from the covalently modified allograft. Similarly, when the vancomycin-modified allograft morsel was used in the assay, no measurable elution was observed; amounts of antibiotic released from the adsorbed samples inhibited S. aureus growth for 4-7 days. Probably the most telling property of the allograft was that after 2 weeks, the tethered allograft was able to resist bacterial colonization. Unlike the elution system in which vancomycin was depleted over the course of days-weeks, the antibiotic on the allograft was stably bound even after 300 days, while its biocidal activity remained undiminished for 60 days. This finding was in stark contrast to the antibiotic impregnated allograft, which was readily colonized by bacteria. Finally we chose to evaluate three indicators of cell function: expression of a key transcription factor, expression of selected transcripts, and assessment of cell morphology. Since the tethered antibiotic appeared to have little or no effect on any of these activities, it was concluded that the stable, tethered antibiotic prevented bacterial infection while not modifying bone cell function.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21035576
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10407
      1. Author :
        Ketonis, Constantinos; Barr, Stephanie; Adams, Christopher S; Hickok, Noreen J; Parvizi, Javad
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Clinical orthopaedics and related research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        468
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Substitutes; Bone Transplantation; Prostheses and Implants; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Transplantation, Homologous; Vancomycin; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND Bone grafts are frequently used to supplement bone stock and to establish structural stability. However, graft-associated infection represents a challenging complication leading to increased patient morbidity and healthcare costs. QUESTIONS/PURPOSES We therefore designed this study to (1) determine if increasing initial S. aureus inoculation of bone allograft results in a proportionate increase in colonization; (2) assess if antibiotics decrease colonization and if antibiotic tethering to allograft alters its ability to prevent bacterial colonization; and (3) determine if covalent modification alters the allograft topography or its biological properties. METHODS Allograft bone and vancomycin-modified bone (VAN-bone) was challenged with different doses of S. aureus for times out to 24 hours in the presence or absence of solution vancomycin. Bacterial colonization was assessed by fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and by direct colony counting. Cell density and distribution of osteoblast-like cells on control and modified allograft were then compared. RESULTS Bacterial attachment was apparent within 6 hours with colonization and biofilm formation increasing with time and dose. Solution vancomycin failed to prevent bacterial attachment whereas VAN-bone successfully resisted colonization. The allograft modification did not affect the attachment and distribution of osteoblast-like cells. CONCLUSIONS Allograft bone was readily colonized by S. aureus and covered by a biofilm with especially florid growth in natural topographic niches. Using a novel covalent modification, allograft bone was able to resist colonization by organisms while retaining the ability to allow adhesion of osteoblastic cells. CLINICAL RELEVANCE Generation of allograft bone that can resist infection in vivo would be important in addressing one of the most challenging problems associated with the use of allograft, namely infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20361282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9981
      1. Author :
        Kim DE, Kim JY, Schellingerhout D, Shon SM, Jeong SW, Kim EJ and Kim WK
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques causes plaque vulnerability and rupture, leading to thromboembolic complications. Cathepsin B (CatB) proteases secreted by macrophages play a major role in plaque inflammation. We used a CatB-activatable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agent to demonstrate the inflammatory component in mice atheromata and the atherosclerosis- modulating effects of atorvastatin or glucosamine treatments. Apolipoprotein E knockout mice (n = 35) were fed normal chow, a Western diet, a Western diet + atorvastatin, a Western diet + glucosamine, or a Western diet + atorvastatin + glucosamine for 14 weeks. Twenty-four hours after the intravenous injection of a CatB-activatable probe, ex vivo NIRF imaging of the aortas and brains was performed, followed by histology. The CatB-related signal, observed in the aortas but not in the cerebral arteries, correlated very well with protease activity and the presence of macrophages on histology. Animals on Western diets could be distinguished from animals on a normal diet. The antiatherosclerotic effects of atorvastatin and glucosamine could be demonstrated, with reduced CatB-related signal compared with untreated animals. Plaque populations were heterogeneous within individuals, with some plaques showing a high and others a lower CatB-related signal. These differences in signal intensity could not be predicted by visual inspection of the plaques but did correlate with histologic evidence of inflammation in every case. This suggests that vulnerable inflamed plaques can be identified by optical molecular imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.bcdecker.com/pubMedLinkOut.aspx?pub=MIO&vol=8&iss=5&page=291
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4558
      1. Author :
        Kim, J. B.; Urban, K.; Cochran, E.; Lee, S.; Ang, A.; Rice, B.; Bata, A.; Campbell, K.; Coffee, R.; Gorodinsky, A.; Lu, Z.; Zhou, H.; Kishimoto, T. K.; Lassota, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, VIS, 4T1-luc2, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Female; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Lentivirus/genetics; Luciferases/genetics/*metabolism; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/metabolism/secondary; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/diagnosis/genetics/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Time Factors; Transfection; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection of tumors can significantly improve the outcome of tumor treatment. One of the most frequently asked questions in cancer imaging is how many cells can be detected non-invasively in a live animal. Although many factors limit such detection, increasing the light emission from cells is one of the most effective ways of overcoming these limitations. Here, we describe development and utilization of a lentiviral vector containing enhanced firefly luciferase (luc2) gene. The resulting single cell clones of the mouse mammary gland tumor (4T1-luc2) showed stable light emission in the range of 10,000 photons/sec/cell. In some cases individual 4T1-luc2 cells inserted under the skin of a nu/nu mouse could be detected non-invasively using a cooled CCD camera in some cases. In addition, we showed that only few cells are needed to develop tumors in these mice and tumor progression can be monitored right after the cells are implanted. Significantly higher luciferase activity in these cells allowed us to detect micrometastases in both, syngeneic Balb/c and nu/nu mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20186331
      14. Call Number :
        139615
      15. Serial :
        7111
      1. Author :
        Kim, J. K.; Won, Y. W.; Lim, K. S.; Kim, Y. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Pharm Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Animals; Antineoplastic Agents/*administration & dosage/pharmacokinetics/therapeutic use; Delayed-Action Preparations/*chemistry; Male; Methylcellulose/*chemistry; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; *Micelles; Neoplasms/drug therapy; Poloxamer/*chemistry; Taxoids/*administration & dosage/pharmacokinetics/therapeutic use
      12. Abstract :
        PURPOSE: To develop low-molecular-weight methylcellulose (LMw MC)-based gel/Pluronic F127 micelle combination system for local and sustained delivery of docetaxel (DTX). METHODS: LMw MC and Pluronic F127 were used to formulate an injectable thermo-reversible gel/micelle combination system containing DTX. The DTX-loaded combination system was characterized and its therapeutic efficacy evaluated in a subcutaneous tumor model. RESULTS: Mixtures of LMw MC, AS, and Pluronic F127 formed gel at ~15-40 degrees C depending on AS concentration. The combination system released DTX for >30 days with a biphasic and sustained release pattern, and DTX stability was maintained during release. The combination system significantly enhanced anti-cancer effects of DTX and prolonged survival of the model mouse in comparison with free DTX. CONCLUSIONS: The LMw MC gel/Pluronic F127 micelle combination system constitutes a promising tool for reducing tumor size and eradicating remaining tumor cells before and after surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21904934
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10531
      1. Author :
        Kim, Jae-Beom; Urban, Konnie; Cochran, Edward; Lee, Steve; Ang, Angel; Rice, Bradley; Bata, Adam; Campbell, Kenneth; Coffee, Richard; Gorodinsky, Alex; Lu, Zhan; Zhou, He; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei; Lassota, Peter
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2; Animals; Bicuculline; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Genetic Vectors; Lentivirus; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms; Sensitivity and Specificity; Time Factors; Transfection; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection of tumors can significantly improve the outcome of tumor treatment. One of the most frequently asked questions in cancer imaging is how many cells can be detected non-invasively in a live animal. Although many factors limit such detection, increasing the light emission from cells is one of the most effective ways of overcoming these limitations. Here, we describe development and utilization of a lentiviral vector containing enhanced firefly luciferase (luc2) gene. The resulting single cell clones of the mouse mammary gland tumor (4T1-luc2) showed stable light emission in the range of 10,000 photons/sec/cell. In some cases individual 4T1-luc2 cells inserted under the skin of a nu/nu mouse could be detected non-invasively using a cooled CCD camera in some cases. In addition, we showed that only few cells are needed to develop tumors in these mice and tumor progression can be monitored right after the cells are implanted. Significantly higher luciferase activity in these cells allowed us to detect micrometastases in both, syngeneic Balb/c and nu/nu mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20186331
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8938
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