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      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        112
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antigen Presentation; Antigens, Neoplasm; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; B-Lymphocytes; Cell Adhesion; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; dendritic cells; Female; Lectins, C-Type; Lymphatic Metastasis; Lymphatic System; Macrophages; Male; Mannose-Binding Lectins; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Receptors, Cell Surface; T-Lymphocytes
      12. Abstract :
        Macrophage mannose receptor (MR) participates in pathogen recognition, clearance of endogenous serum glycoproteins, and antigen presentation. MR is also present on lymphatic vessels, where its function is unknown. Here we show that migration of lymphocytes from the skin into the draining lymph nodes through the afferent lymphatics is reduced in MR-deficient mice, while the structure of lymphatic vasculature remains normal in these animals. Moreover, in a tumor model the primary tumors grow significantly bigger in MR(-/-) mice than in the wild-type (WT) controls, whereas the regional lymph node metastases are markedly smaller. Adhesion of both normal lymphocytes and tumor cells to lymphatic vessels is significantly decreased in MR-deficient mice. The ability of macrophages to present tumor antigens is indistinguishable between the 2 genotypes. Thus, MR on lymphatic endothelial cells is involved in leukocyte trafficking and contributes to the metastatic behavior of cancer cells. Blocking of MR may provide a new approach to controlling inflammation and cancer metastasis by targeting the lymphatic vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18434610
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9000
      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Jacobson, J. R.; Berdyshev, E.; Huang, Y.; Sun, X.; Zhao, Y.; Gerhold, L. M.; Siegler, J.; Evenoski, C.; Wang, T.; Zhou, T.; Zaidi, R.; Moreno-Vinasco, L.; Bittman, R.; Chen, C. T.; LaRiviere, P. J.; Sammani, S.; Lussier, Y. A.; Dudek, S. M.; Natarajan, V.; Weichselbaum, R. R.; Garcia, J. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Faseb J
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid/chemistry; Ceramides/metabolism; Female; Gene Deletion; Gene Expression Regulation/physiology; Lung/*radiation effects; Lysophospholipids/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; *Radiation Injuries, Experimental; Receptors, Lysosphingolipid/genetics/metabolism; Sphingolipids/*metabolism; Sphingosine/*analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Clinically significant radiation-induced lung injury (RILI) is a common toxicity in patients administered thoracic radiotherapy. Although the molecular etiology is poorly understood, we previously characterized a murine model of RILI in which alterations in lung barrier integrity surfaced as a potentially important pathobiological event and genome-wide lung gene mRNA levels identified dysregulation of sphingolipid metabolic pathway genes. We hypothesized that sphingolipid signaling components serve as modulators and novel therapeutic targets of RILI. Sphingolipid involvement in murine RILI was confirmed by radiation-induced increases in lung expression of sphingosine kinase (SphK) isoforms 1 and 2 and increases in the ratio of ceramide to sphingosine 1-phosphate (S1P) and dihydro-S1P (DHS1P) levels in plasma, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and lung tissue. Mice with a targeted deletion of SphK1 (SphK1(-/-)) or with reduced expression of S1P receptors (S1PR1(+/-), S1PR2(-/-), and S1PR3(-/-)) exhibited marked RILI susceptibility. Finally, studies of 3 potent vascular barrier-protective S1P analogs, FTY720, (S)-FTY720-phosphonate (fTyS), and SEW-2871, identified significant RILI attenuation and radiation-induced gene dysregulation by the phosphonate analog, fTyS (0.1 and 1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk) and to a lesser degree by SEW-2871 (1 mg/kg i.p., 2x/wk), compared with those in controls. These results support the targeting of S1P signaling as a novel therapeutic strategy in RILI.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21712494
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 18
      15. Serial :
        10371
      1. Author :
        Mathew, B.; Lennon, F.E.; Siegler, J.; Mirzapoiazova, T.; Mambetsariev, N.; Sammani, S.; Gerhold, L.M.; Lariviere, P.J.; Chen, C.-T.; Garcia, J.G.N.; Salgia, R.; Moss, J.; Singleton, P.A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Anesthesia and Analgesia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        112
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Cancer; flank tumor; In vivo; MMPSense 750; ProSense 680; tomography; VisEn FMT
      12. Abstract :
        <AbstractText Label=“BACKGROUND” NlmCategory=“BACKGROUND”>The possibility that μ opioid agonists can influence cancer recurrence is a subject of recent interest. Epidemiologic studies suggested that there were differences in cancer recurrence in breast and prostate cancer contingent on anesthetic regimens. In this study, we identify a possible mechanism for these epidemiologic findings on the basis of μ opioid receptor (MOR) regulation of Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) tumorigenicity in cell and animal models.</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“METHODS” NlmCategory=“METHODS”>We used human lung tissue and human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and evaluated MOR expression using immunoblot and immunohistochemical analysis. LLC cells were treated with the peripheral opioid antagonist methylnaltrexone (MNTX) or MOR shRNA and evaluated for proliferation, invasion, and soft agar colony formation in vitro and primary tumor growth and lung metastasis in C57BL/6 and MOR knockout mice using VisEn fluorescence mediated tomography imaging and immunohistochemical analysis.</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“RESULTS” NlmCategory=“RESULTS”>We provide several lines of evidence that the MOR may be a potential target for lung cancer, a disease with high mortality and few treatment options. We first observed that there is ~5- to 10-fold increase in MOR expression in lung samples from patients with NSCLC and in several human NSCLC cell lines. The MOR agonists morphine and [d-Ala(2), N-MePhe(4), Gly-ol]-enkephalin (DAMGO) increased in vitro LLC cell growth. Treatment with MNTX or silencing MOR expression inhibited LLC invasion and anchorage-independent growth by 50%-80%. Injection of MOR silenced LLC lead to a ~65% reduction in mouse lung metastasis. In addition, MOR knockout mice do not develop significant tumors when injected with LLC in comparison with wild-type controls. Finally, continuous infusion of the peripheral opioid antagonist MNTX attenuates primary LLC tumor growth and reduces lung metastasis.</AbstractText> <AbstractText Label=“CONCLUSIONS” NlmCategory=“CONCLUSIONS”>Taken together, our data suggest a possible direct effect of opiates on lung cancer progression, and provide a plausible explanation for the epidemiologic findings. Our observations further suggest a possible therapeutic role for opioid antagonists.</AbstractText>
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21156980
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8557
      15. Serial :
        4797
      1. Author :
        Matsumoto, K.; Azami, T.; Otsu, A.; Takase, H.; Ishitobi, H.; Tanaka, J.; Miwa, Y.; Takahashi, S.; Ema, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Genesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        50
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Blood Vessels/embryology/*physiology; Chromosomes, Artificial, Bacterial; Embryo, Mammalian; Endothelial Cells/cytology/metabolism; Endothelium, Vascular/cytology/embryology/metabolism; Female; Founder Effect; Gene Expression Regulation, Developmental; Genes, Reporter; Mice; *Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Morphogenesis/physiology; *Neovascularization, Pathologic; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Retina/embryology/*physiology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/genetics/metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-1/genetics/*metabolism; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor Receptor-2/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        Blood vessel development and network patterning are controlled by several signaling molecules, including VEGF, FGF, TGF-ss, and Ang-1,2. Among these, the role of VEGF-A signaling in vessel morphogenesis is best understood. The biological activity of VEGF-A depends on its reaction with specific receptors Flt1 and Flk1. Roles of VEGF-A signaling in endothelial cell proliferation, migration, survival, vascular permeability, and induction of tip cell filopodia have been reported. In this study, we have generated Flt1-tdsRed BAC transgenic (Tg) mice to monitor Flt1 gene expression during vascular development. We show that tdsRed fluorescence is observed within blood vessels of adult mice and embryos, indicative of retinal angiogenesis and tumor angiogenesis. Flt1 expression recapitulated by Flt1-tdsRed BAC Tg mice overlapped well with Flk1, while Flt1 was expressed more abundantly in endothelial cells of large blood vessels such as dorsal aorta and presumptive stalk cells in retina, providing a unique model to study blood vessel development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22489010
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10437
      1. Author :
        Matthias Nahrendorf, Peter Waterman, Greg Thurber, Kevin Groves, Milind Rajopadhye, Peter Panizzi, Brett Marinelli, Elena Aikawa, Mikael J Pittet, Filip K Swirski and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        FMT-CT; molecular imaging; atherosclerosis; protease activity; inflammation; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Objective: Proteases are emerging biomarkers of inflammatory diseases. In atherosclerosis, these enzymes are often secreted by inflammatory macrophages, digest the extracellular matrix of the fibrous cap and destabilize atheromata. Protease function can be monitored with protease activatable imaging probes and quantitated in vivo by fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). To address two major constraints currently associated with imaging of murine atherosclerosis (lack of highly sensitive probes and absence of anatomical information), we compared protease sensors (PS) of variable size and pharmacokinetics and co-registered FMT datasets with computed tomography (FMT-CT).

        Methods and results: Co-registration of FMT and CT was achieved with a multimodal imaging cartridge containing fiducial markers detectable by both modalities. A high-resolution CT angiography protocol accurately localized fluorescence to the aortic root of atherosclerotic apoE-/- mice. To identify suitable sensors, we first modeled signal kinetics in-silico and then compared three probes with identical oligo-L-lysine cleavage sequences: PS-5, 5nm in diameter containing 2 fluorochromes , PS-25, a 25nm version with an elongated lysine chain and PS-40, a polymeric nanoparticle. Serial FMT-CT showed fastest kinetics for PS-5 but, surprisingly, highest fluorescence in lesions of the aortic root for PS-40. PS-40 robustly reported therapeutic effects of atorvastatin, corroborated by ex vivo imaging and qPCR for the model protease cathepsin B.

        Conclusions: FMT-CT is a robust and observer-independent tool for non-invasive assessment of inflammatory murine atherosclerosis. Reporter-containing nanomaterials may have unique advantages over small molecule agents for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2746251/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4568
      1. Author :
        Matthias Nahrendorf; Edmund Keliher; Brett Marinelli; Peter Waterman; Paolo Fumene Feruglio; Lioubov Fexon; Misha Pivovarov; Filip K. Swirski; Mikael J. Pittet; Claudio Vinegoni; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PNAS
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        107
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; Fluorescence Imaging Agents; ProSense; fluorescence-mediated tomography; molecular imaging; multimodal image fusion; computed tomography; cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Fusion imaging of radionuclide-based molecular (PET) and structural data [x-ray computed tomography (CT)] has been firmly established. Here we show that optical measurements [fluorescence-mediated tomography (FMT)] show exquisite congruence to radionuclide measurements and that information can be seamlessly integrated and visualized. Using biocompatible nanoparticles as a generic platform (containing a 18F isotope and a far red fluorochrome), we show good correlations between FMT and PET in probe concentration (r2 > 0.99) and spatial signal distribution (r2 > 0.85). Using a mouse model of cancer and different imaging probes to measure tumoral proteases, macrophage content and integrin expression simultaneously, we demonstrate the distinct tumoral locations of probes in multiple channels in vivo. The findings also suggest that FMT can serve as a surrogate modality for the screening and development of radionuclide-based imaging agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.pnas.org/content/107/17/7910.abstract?sid=084c1ba8-0b02-4833-acdd-b57bea226faf
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4468
      1. Author :
        McCann CM, Waterman P, Figueiredo JL, Aikawa E, Weissleder R and Chen JW
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Neuroimage
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        45
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Neuroscience
      11. Keywords :
        FMT; in vivo imaging; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Fluorescent molecular tomographic (FMT) imaging can noninvasively monitor molecular function in living animals using specific fluorescent probes. However, macroscopic imaging methods such as FMT generally exhibit low anatomical details. To overcome this, we report a quantitative technique to image both structure and function by combining FMT and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. We show that FMT-MR imaging can produce three-dimensional, multimodal images of living mouse brains allowing for serial monitoring of tumor morphology and protease activity. Combined FMT-MR tumor imaging provides a unique in vivo diagnostic parameter, protease activity concentration (PAC), which reflects histological changes in tumors and is significantly altered by systemic chemotherapy. Alterations in this diagnostic parameter are detectable early after chemotherapy and correlate with subsequent tumor growth, predicting tumor response to chemotherapy. Our results reveal that combined FMT-MR imaging of fluorescent molecular probes could be valuable for brain tumor drug development and other neurological and somatic imaging applications.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19154791
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4544
      1. Author :
        Meincke, M.; Tiwari, S.; Hattermann, K.; Kalthoff, H.; Mentlein, R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Clin Exp Metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/metabolism/*pathology; Cattle; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Fluorescent Dyes/diagnostic use; Glioma/metabolism/*pathology; Humans; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted; Mice; Mice, Nude; Receptors, CXCR/*metabolism; Receptors, CXCR4/*metabolism; Serum Albumin, Bovine/metabolism; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        The chemokine CXCL12/SDF-1 and its receptors CXCR4 and CXCR7 play a major role in tumor invasion, proliferation and metastasis. Since both receptors are overexpressed on distinct tumor cells and on the tumor vasculature, we evaluated their potential as targets for detection of cancers by molecular imaging. We synthesized conjugates of CXCL12 and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent dye IRDye((R))800CW, tested their selectivity, sensitivity and biological activity in vitro and their feasibility to visualize tumors in vivo. Purified CXCL12-conjugates detected in vitro as low as 500 A764 human glioma cells or MCF-7 breast cancer cells that express CXCR7 alone or together with CXCR4. Binding was time- and concentration-dependent, and the label could be competitively displaced by the native peptide. Control conjugates with bovine serum albumin or lactalbumin failed to label the cells. In mice, the conjugate distributed rapidly. After 1-92 h, subcutaneous tumors of human MCF-7 and A764 cells in immunodeficient mice were detected with high sensitivity. Background was observed in particular in liver within the first 24 h, but also skull and hind limbs yielded some background. Overall, fluorescent CXCL12-conjugates are sensitive and selective probes to detect solid and metastatic tumors by targeting tumor cells and tumor vasculature.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21735100
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 13
      15. Serial :
        10372