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      1. Author :
        Tanaka, M.; Mroz, P.; Dai, T.; Huang, L.; Morimoto, Y.; Kinoshita, M.; Yoshihara, Y.; Shinomiya, N.; Seki, S.; Nemoto, K.; Hamblin, M. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2013
      5. Publication :
        Photochem Photobiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously reported that photodynamic therapy (PDT) using intra-articular methylene blue (MB) could be used to treat arthritis in mice caused by bioluminescent methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) either in a therapeutic or in a preventative mode. PDT accumulated neutrophils into the mouse knee via activation of chemoattractants such as inflammatory cytokines or chemokines. In the present study, we asked whether PDT combined with antibiotics used for MRSA could provide added benefit in controlling the infection. We compared MB-PDT alone, systemic administration of either linezolid (LZD) alone or vancomycin (VCM) alone or the combination of PDT with either LZD or VCM. Real-time non-invasive imaging was used to serially follow the progress of the infection. PDT alone was the most effective, while LZD alone was ineffective and VCM alone showed some benefit. Surprisingly the addition of LZD or VCM reduced the therapeutic effect of PDT alone (P<0.05). Considering that PDT in this mouse model stimulates neutrophils to be antibacterial rather than actively killing the bacteria, we propose that LZD and VCM might inhibit the activation of inflammatory cytokines without eradicating the bacteria, and thereby reduce the therapeutic effect of PDT. (c) 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Photochemistry and Photobiology (c) 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23311407
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10558
      1. Author :
        Tekabe, Y.; Klose, A.; Nizami, S.; Luma, J.; Lee, F. Y.; Johnson, L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biophotonics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Antigens, CD31/metabolism; Capillaries/metabolism; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Femoral Artery/surgery; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use/metabolism; Hindlimb/*blood supply/metabolism/pathology; Integrin alphaV/metabolism; Integrin alphaVbeta3/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Ischemia/*pathology; Ligation; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Microscopy, Fluorescence; *Neovascularization, Physiologic; Plant Lectins/metabolism; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        Optical agents targeting alpha(v)beta(3) are potential tools to image the angiogenic response to limb ischemia. The left (L) femoral artery was ligated in 17 mice and sham surgery performed on the contralateral right (R) hindlimb. Seven days later, IntegriSense (2 nmol) was injected into 11 mice and 6 were probe controls. Six hours later, mice underwent optical imaging. Ratios of photon flux in the L/R limbs were calculated. Tissue was stained for alpha(v) , CD31, and lectin. The signal was increased in the ischemic limbs compared to contralateral legs and ratio of photon flux in L/R limb averaged 2.37. Control probe showed no hindlimb signal. IntegriSense colocalized with CD31 by dual fluorescent staining. Ratios for L/R hindlimbs correlated with quantitative lectin staining (r = 0.88, p = 0.003). Optical imaging can identify and quantify angiogenic response to hindlimb ischemia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22031282
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10380
      1. Author :
        Themelis, G.; Harlaar, N. J.; Kelder, W.; Bart, J.; Sarantopoulos, A.; van Dam, G. M.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Ann Surg Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        18
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; *Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Fluorescence; Fluorescent Dyes/*diagnostic use; Humans; Integrin alphaVbeta3/*metabolism; Luciferases/metabolism; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/*diagnosis/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Nude; Spectroscopy, Near-Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: This study was designed to improve the surgical procedure and outcome of cancer surgery by means of real-time molecular imaging feedback of tumor spread and margin delineation using targeted near-infrared fluorescent probes with specificity to tumor biomarkers. Surgical excision of cancer often is confronted with difficulties in the identification of cancer spread and the accurate delineation of tumor margins. Currently, the assessment of tumor borders is afforded by postoperative pathology or, less reliably, intraoperative frozen sectioning. Fluorescence imaging is a natural modality for intraoperative use by directly relating to the surgeon's vision and offers highly attractive characteristics, such as high-resolution, sensitivity, and portability. Via the use of targeted probes it also becomes highly tumor-specific and can lead to significant improvements in surgical procedures and outcome. METHODS: Mice bearing xenograft human tumors were injected with alphavbeta3-integrin receptor-targeted fluorescent probe and in vivo visualized by using a novel, real-time, multispectral fluorescence imaging system. Confirmatory ex vivo imaging, bioluminescence imaging, and histopathology were used to validate the in vivo findings. RESULTS: Fluorescence images were all in good correspondence with the confirming bioluminescence images in respect to signal colocalization. Fluorescence imaging detected all tumors and successfully guided total tumor excision by effectively detecting small tumor residuals, which occasionally were missed by the surgeon. Tumor tissue exhibited target-to-background ratio of ~4.0, which was significantly higher compared with white-light images representing the visual contrast. Histopathology confirmed the capability of the method to identify tumor negative margins with high specificity and better prediction rate compared with visual inspection. CONCLUSIONS: Real-time multispectral fluorescence imaging using tumor specific molecular probes is a promising modality for tumor excision by offering real time feedback to the surgeon in the operating room.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21509632
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 11
      15. Serial :
        10381
      1. Author :
        Thobe, M N; Gurusamy, D; Pathrose, P; Waltz, S E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Oncogene
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antigens, CD31; Bioware; Blotting, Western; Cell Line; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement; Chemokine CXCL1; Chemokine CXCL5; Chemokines; Endothelial Cells; Gene Expression Regulation, Neoplastic; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Interleukin-8; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasms, Experimental; Neovascularization, Pathologic; NF-kappa B; PC-3M-luc2; Prostatic Neoplasms; Receptor Protein-Tyrosine Kinases; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; RNA Interference; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Overexpression of the Ron receptor tyrosine kinase has recently been shown in a wide variety of human cancers. However, no studies have examined Ron receptor expression or function during prostate tumorigenesis. In this study we report that Ron is highly expressed in human prostate adenocarcinoma and metastatic lymph nodes when compared with normal prostate or benign prostate hyperplasia. Furthermore, we show that Ron is overexpressed in PC-3 and DU145 prostate cancer cell lines, and that the levels of angiogenic chemokines produced by prostate cancer cells positively correlate with Ron expression. The knockdown of Ron in PC-3 or DU145 cells results in a significant decrease in angiogenic chemokine production and is associated with a decreased activation of the transcription factor nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB). Moreover, exogenous overexpression of Ron in LNCaP cells is sufficient to induce a significant increase in angiogenic chemokines that can be abrogated by inhibition of NF-kappaB signaling. Given that the function of angiogenic chemokines is important in the development of new blood vessels, we also examined the ability of Ron to modulate endothelial cell migration. Our data show that knockdown of Ron in prostate cancer cells results in significantly less endothelial cell chemotaxis when compared with Ron-expressing cells in vitro as well as in reduced tumor growth and decreased microvessel density after orthotopic transplantation into the prostate in vivo. In total, our data suggest that the Ron receptor is important in modulating prostate tumor growth by modulating angiogenic chemokine production and subsequent endothelial cell recruitment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19838218
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8943
      1. Author :
        Thomas Christen, Matthias Nahrendorf, Moritz Wildgruber, Filip K. Swirski, Elena Aikawa, Peter Waterman, Koichi Shimizu, Ralph Weissleder and Peter Libby
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Circulation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        14
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; inflammation; leukocytes; rejection; transplantation; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; Prosense
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Clinical detection of transplant rejection by repeated endomyocardial biopsy requires catheterization and entails risks. Recently developed molecular and cellular imaging techniques that visualize macrophage host responses could provide a noninvasive alternative. Yet, which macrophage functions may provide useful markers for detecting parenchymal rejection remains uncertain.

        Methods and Results: We transplanted isografts from B6 mice and allografts from Balb/c mice heterotopically into B6 recipients. In this allograft across major histocompatability barriers, the transplanted heart undergoes predictable progressive rejection, leading to graft failure after 1 week. During rejection, crucial macrophage functions, including phagocytosis and release of proteases, render these abundant innate immune cells attractive imaging targets. Two or 6 days after transplantation, we injected either a fluorescent protease sensor or a magnetofluorescent phagocytosis marker. Histological and flow cytometric analyses established that macrophages function as the major cellular signal source. In vivo, we obtained a 3-dimensional functional map of macrophages showing higher phagocytic uptake of magnetofluorescent nanoparticles during rejection using magnetic resonance imaging and higher protease activity in allografts than in isografts using tomographic fluorescence. We further assessed the sensitivity of imaging to detect the degree of rejection. In vivo imaging of macrophage response correlated closely with gradually increasing allograft rejection and attenuated rejection in recipients with a genetically impaired immune response resulting from a deficiency in recombinase-1 (RAG-1-/-).

        Conclusions: Molecular imaging reporters of either phagocytosis or protease activity can detect cardiac allograft rejection noninvasively, promise to enhance the search for novel tolerance-inducing strategies, and have translational potential.
      13. URL :
        http://circ.ahajournals.org/cgi/content/abstract/circulationaha;119/14/1925
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4640
      1. Author :
        Thomas Reiner, Rainer H. Kohler, Chong Wee Liew, Jonathan Hill, Jason Gaglia, Rohit Kulkarni and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjugate Chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        21
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Metabolic Disorders
      11. Keywords :
        Beta-cells; GLP1-R; imaging; targeting; in vivo imaging; VivoTag; AngioSense; Diabetes
      12. Abstract :
        The ability to image and ultimately quantitate beta-cell mass in vivo will likely have far reaching implications in the study of diabetes biology, in the monitoring of disease progression or response to treatment, as well as for drug development. Here, using animal models, we report on the synthesis, characterization of, and intravital microscopic imaging properties of a near infrared fluorescent exendin-4 analogue with specificity for the GLP-1 receptor on beta cells (E4K12-Fl). The agent demonstrated sub-nanomolar EC50 binding concentrations, with high specificity and binding could be inhibited by GLP-1R agonists. Following intravenous administration to mice, pancreatic islets were readily distinguishable from exocrine pancreas, achieving target-to-background ratios within the pancreas of 6:1, as measured by intravital microscopy. Serial imaging revealed rapid accumulation kinetics (with initial signal within the islets detectable within 3 minutes and peak fluorescence within 20 minutes of injection) making this an ideal agent for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2912453/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4561
      1. Author :
        Thurlow, L. R.; Hanke, M. L.; Fritz, T.; Angle, A.; Aldrich, A.; Williams, S. H.; Engebretsen, I. L.; Bayles, K. W.; Horswill, A. R.; Kielian, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        186
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Animals; *Biofilms; Catheter-Related Infections/immunology/metabolism/microbiology; Cytokines/immunology/metabolism; Green Fluorescent Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Host-Pathogen Interactions/immunology; Immune Evasion/immunology; Inflammation/*immunology/metabolism; Macrophages/*immunology/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Mice, Transgenic; Microscopy, Confocal; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning; Models, Immunological; Phagocytosis/*immunology; Staphylococcal Infections/*immunology/metabolism/microbiology; Staphylococcus aureus/*immunology/physiology/ultrastructure; Toll-Like Receptor 2/genetics/immunology; Toll-Like Receptor 9/genetics/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms are complex communities of bacteria encased in a matrix composed primarily of polysaccharides, extracellular DNA, and protein. Staphylococcus aureus can form biofilm infections, which are often debilitating due to their chronicity and recalcitrance to antibiotic therapy. Currently, the immune mechanisms elicited during biofilm growth and their impact on bacterial clearance remain to be defined. We used a mouse model of catheter-associated biofilm infection to assess the functional importance of TLR2 and TLR9 in the host immune response during biofilm formation, because ligands for both receptors are present within the biofilm. Interestingly, neither TLR2 nor TLR9 impacted bacterial density or inflammatory mediator secretion during biofilm growth in vivo, suggesting that S. aureus biofilms circumvent these traditional bacterial recognition pathways. Several potential mechanisms were identified to account for biofilm evasion of innate immunity, including significant reductions in IL-1beta, TNF-alpha, CXCL2, and CCL2 expression during biofilm infection compared with the wound healing response elicited by sterile catheters, limited macrophage invasion into biofilms in vivo, and a skewing of the immune response away from a microbicidal phenotype as evidenced by decreases in inducible NO synthase expression concomitant with robust arginase-1 induction. Coculture studies of macrophages with S. aureus biofilms in vitro revealed that macrophages successful at biofilm invasion displayed limited phagocytosis and gene expression patterns reminiscent of alternatively activated M2 macrophages. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that S. aureus biofilms are capable of attenuating traditional host proinflammatory responses, which may explain why biofilm infections persist in an immunocompetent host.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21525381
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10457
      1. Author :
        Tremoleda, J. L.; Khalil, M.; Gompels, L. L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, M.; Vincent, T.; Gsell, W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        EJNMMI Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22214535
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10477
      1. Author :
        Tseng, J. C.; Granot, T.; DiGiacomo, V.; Levin, B.; Meruelo, D.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, IVIS, Alphavirus Infections/pathology/*therapy/virology; Animals; Antineoplastic Agents, Phytogenic/therapeutic use; Blotting, Western; Cell Membrane Permeability; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; *Genetic Vectors; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*prevention & control; Neuroblastoma/blood supply/therapy/virology; *Oncolytic Virotherapy; Ovarian Neoplasms/*blood supply/*therapy/virology; Paclitaxel/therapeutic use; Sindbis Virus/*physiology; Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A/metabolism; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Genetic instability of cancer cells generates resistance after initial responses to chemotherapeutic agents. Several oncolytic viruses have been designed to exploit specific signatures of cancer cells, such as important surface markers or pivotal signaling pathways for selective replication. It is less likely for cancer cells to develop resistance given that mutations in these cancer signatures would negatively impact tumor growth and survival. However, as oncolytic viral vectors are large particles, they suffer from inefficient extravasation from tumor blood vessels. Their ability to reach cancer cells is an important consideration in achieving specific oncolytic targeting and potential vector replication. Our previous studies indicated that the Sindbis viral vectors target tumor cells by the laminin receptor. Here, we present evidence that modulating tumor vascular leakiness, using VEGF and/or metronomic chemotherapy regimens, significantly enhances tumor vascular permeability and directly enhances oncolytic Sindbis vector targeting in tumor models. Because host-derived vascular endothelium cells are genetically stable and less likely to develop resistance to chemotherapeutics, a combined metronomic chemotherapeutics and oncolytic vector regimen should provide a new approach for cancer therapy. This mechanism could explain the synergistic treatment outcomes observed in clinical trials of combined therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19798121
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10442
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