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      1. Author :
        Sjollema, J.; Sharma, P. K.; Dijkstra, R. J.; van Dam, G. M.; van der Mei, H. C.; Engelsman, A. F.; Busscher, H. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Anti-Infective Agents/*pharmacology/therapeutic use; Bacteria/*drug effects/pathogenicity; Bacterial Infections/drug therapy/*etiology; Biocompatible Materials/*adverse effects/chemistry; Biofilms; Coated Materials, Biocompatible/chemistry; Fluorescent Dyes/chemistry/metabolism; Humans; Image Enhancement/methods; Light; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Luminescent Proteins/metabolism; Microscopy, Fluorescence/instrumentation/*methods; Prosthesis-Related Infections/drug therapy/microbiology; Sensitivity and Specificity
      12. Abstract :
        This review presents the current state of Bioluminescence and Fluorescent Imaging technologies (BLI and FLI) as applied to Biomaterial-Associated Infections (BAI). BLI offers the opportunity to observe the in vivo course of BAI in small animals without the need to sacrifice animals at different time points after the onset of infection. BLI is highly dependent on the bacterial cell metabolism which makes BLI a strong reporter of viable bacterial presence. Fluorescent sources are generally more stable than bioluminescent ones and specifically targeted, which renders the combination of BLI and FLI a promising tool for imaging BAI. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of both imaging tools are, however, dependent on the imaging system used and the tissue characteristics, which makes the interpretation of images, in terms of the location and shape of the illuminating source, difficult. Tomographic reconstruction of the luminescent source is possible in the most modern instruments, enabling exact localization of a colonized implant material, spreading of infecting organisms in surrounding tissue and immunological tissue reactions. BLI studies on BAI have successfully distinguished between different biomaterials with respect to the development and clearance of BAI in vivo, simultaneously reducing animal use and experimental variation. It is anticipated that bio-optical imaging will become an indispensable technology for the in vivo evaluation of antimicrobial coatings.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19969345
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10397
      1. Author :
        Sjollema, Jelmer; Sharma, Prashant K; Dijkstra, Rene J B; van Dam, Gooitzen M; van der Mei, Henny C; Engelsman, Anton F; Busscher, Henk J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bacteria; Bacterial Infections; Biocompatible Materials; Biofilms; Bioware; Coated Materials, Biocompatible; Fluorescent Dyes; Humans; Image Enhancement; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Prosthesis-Related Infections; Sensitivity and Specificity; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        This review presents the current state of Bioluminescence and Fluorescent Imaging technologies (BLI and FLI) as applied to Biomaterial-Associated Infections (BAI). BLI offers the opportunity to observe the in vivo course of BAI in small animals without the need to sacrifice animals at different time points after the onset of infection. BLI is highly dependent on the bacterial cell metabolism which makes BLI a strong reporter of viable bacterial presence. Fluorescent sources are generally more stable than bioluminescent ones and specifically targeted, which renders the combination of BLI and FLI a promising tool for imaging BAI. The sensitivity and spatial resolution of both imaging tools are, however, dependent on the imaging system used and the tissue characteristics, which makes the interpretation of images, in terms of the location and shape of the illuminating source, difficult. Tomographic reconstruction of the luminescent source is possible in the most modern instruments, enabling exact localization of a colonized implant material, spreading of infecting organisms in surrounding tissue and immunological tissue reactions. BLI studies on BAI have successfully distinguished between different biomaterials with respect to the development and clearance of BAI in vivo, simultaneously reducing animal use and experimental variation. It is anticipated that bio-optical imaging will become an indispensable technology for the in vivo evaluation of antimicrobial coatings.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19969345
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9038
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adhesins, Bacterial; Animals; Antigens, CD46; Bacteremia; Bacterial Outer Membrane Proteins; Bacterial Proteins; Bacterial Translocation; Bioware; Blood-Brain Barrier; Central Nervous System; Disease Progression; Female; Luminescent Measurements; Luminescent Proteins; Male; Meningitis, Meningococcal; Meningococcal Infections; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Nasal Cavity; pXen-13; Recombinant Fusion Proteins; Respiratory System; Sepsis; Thyroid Gland
      12. Abstract :
        Neisseria meningitidis is a human pathogen that causes septicemia and meningitis with high mortality. The disease progression is rapid and much remains unknown about the disease process. The understanding of disease development is crucial for development of novel therapeutic strategies and vaccines against meningococcal disease. The use of bioluminescent imaging combined with a mouse disease model allowed us to investigate the progression of meningococcal sepsis over time. Injection of bacteria in blood demonstrated waves of bacterial clearance and growth, which selected for Opa-expressing bacteria, indicating the importance of this bacterial protein. Further, N. meningitidis accumulated in the thyroid gland, while thyroid hormone T4 levels decreased. Bacteria reached the mucosal surfaces of the upper respiratory tract, which required expression of the meningococcal PilC1 adhesin. Surprisingly, PilC1 was dispensable for meningococcal growth in blood and for crossing of the blood-brain barrier, indicating that the major role of PilC1 is to interact with mucosal surfaces. This in vivo study reveals disease dynamics and organ targeting during meningococcal disease and presents a potent tool for further investigations of meningococcal pathogenesis and vaccines in vivo. This might lead to development of new strategies to improve the outcome of meningococcal disease in human patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17311106
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9032
      1. Author :
        Smith, B. R.; Kempen, P.; Bouley, D.; Xu, A.; Liu, Z.; Melosh, N.; Dai, H.; Sinclair, R.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nano Lett
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        12
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; *Disease Models, Animal; Ear Neoplasms/*blood supply/pathology; Humans; Mice; Microscopy, Fluorescence; Nanoparticles/*chemistry; *Nanotechnology; Nanotubes, Carbon/chemistry; Neoplasms, Experimental/*blood supply/pathology; Particle Size; Quantum Dots; Surface Properties
      12. Abstract :
        Delivery is one of the most critical obstacles confronting nanoparticle use in cancer diagnosis and therapy. For most oncological applications, nanoparticles must extravasate in order to reach tumor cells and perform their designated task. However, little understanding exists regarding the effect of nanoparticle shape on extravasation. Herein we use real-time intravital microscopic imaging to meticulously examine how two different nanoparticles behave across three different murine tumor models. The study quantitatively demonstrates that high-aspect ratio single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) display extravasational behavior surprisingly different from, and counterintuitive to, spherical nanoparticles although the nanoparticles have similar surface coatings, area, and charge. This work quantitatively indicates that nanoscale extravasational competence is highly dependent on nanoparticle geometry and is heterogeneous.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22650417
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10439
      1. Author :
        Smith, Eric L; Schuchman, Edward H
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Molecular therapy: the journal of the American Society of Gene Therapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        16
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Autophagy; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Survival; Cells, Cultured; Ceramides; Cesium Radioisotopes; CHO Cells; Combined Modality Therapy; Cricetinae; Cricetulus; Endothelium, Vascular; Female; Gamma Rays; Gene Expression Regulation, Enzymologic; Gene Therapy; Humans; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase
      12. Abstract :
        Exposure of cells or animals to stress frequently induces acid sphingomyelinase (ASM)-mediated ceramide production that leads to cell death. Consistent with this, overexpression of ASM in subcutaneous B16-F10 mouse melanomas, in combination with irradiation, resulted in tumors that were up to 12-fold smaller than irradiated control melanomas. Similarly, when irradiated melanomas were pretreated with a single, peritumoral injection of recombinant ASM (rhASM), the tumors were up to threefold smaller. The in vivo effect of ASM was likely due to enhanced cell death of the tumor cells themselves, as well as the surrounding microvascular endothelial cells. In vitro, rhASM had little or no effect on the growth of tumor cells, even in combination with irradiation. However, when the culture media was acidified to mimic the acidic microenvironment of solid tumors, rhASM-mediated cell death was markedly enhanced when combined with irradiation. Microscopic analysis suggested that this was associated with an increase in autophagy. rhASM has been produced for the treatment of the lysosomal storage disorder, type B Niemann-Pick disease, and is currently being evaluated in a phase-1 clinical trial. Based on the data presented in this article, we propose that further investigation of this protein and gene as antineoplastic agents also is warranted.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18628757
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8999
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 19
      15. Serial :
        10378
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Khmelinskii, A.; Lelieveldt, B. P.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/radionuclide imaging/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Forecasting; Optics and Photonics/*trends; Positron-Emission Tomography/methods; Tomography, Emission-Computed, Single-Photon/methods; X-Ray Microtomography/methods; X-Rays
      12. Abstract :
        Optical Imaging has evolved into one of the standard molecular imaging modalities used in pre-clinical cancer research. Bone research however, strongly depends on other imaging modalities such as SPECT, PET, x-ray and muCT. Each imaging modality has its own specific strengths and weaknesses concerning spatial resolution, sensitivity and the possibility to quantify the signal. An increasing number of bone specific optical imaging models and probes have been developed over the past years. This review gives an overview of optical imaging modalities, models and probes that can be used to study skeletal complications of cancer in small laboratory animals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20688203
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10476
      1. Author :
        Snoeks, T. J.; Lowik, C. W.; Kaijzel, E. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense,, Animals; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism; Genes, Reporter; Neovascularization, Pathologic/*diagnosis; *Optical Phenomena
      12. Abstract :
        In recent years, molecular imaging gained significant importance in biomedical research. Optical imaging developed into a modality which enables the visualization and quantification of all kinds of cellular processes and cancerous cell growth in small animals. Novel gene reporter mice and cell lines and the development of targeted and cleavable fluorescent “smart” probes form a powerful imaging toolbox. The development of systems collecting tomographic bioluminescence and fluorescence data enabled even more spatial accuracy and more quantitative measurements. Here we describe various bioluminescent and fluorescent gene reporter models and probes that can be used to specifically image and quantify neovascularization or the angiogenic process itself.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20449766
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10379
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, J. L.; U, L. W.'Ren; Thamm, D. H.; Withrow, S. J.; Dow, S. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Immunol Immunother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Chronic Disease, Disease Models, Animal, Immunity, Innate, Killer Cells, Natural/immunology, Macrophages/immunology, Mice, Mice, Inbred C3H, Mice, Inbred Strains, Monocytes/immunology, Neoplasms, Neovascularization, Pathologic, Osteomyelitis/*complications, Osteosarcoma/*complications/*immunology/pathology, Staphylococcal Infections/*complications IVIS, Xenogen, Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19701748
      14. Call Number :
        143227
      15. Serial :
        5718
      1. Author :
        Sottnik, Joseph L; U'Ren, Lance W; Thamm, Douglas H; Withrow, Stephen J; Dow, Steven W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer immunology, immunotherapy: CII
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        59
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chronic Disease; Disease Models, Animal; Immunity, Innate; Killer Cells, Natural; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred Strains; Monocytes; Neoplasms; Neovascularization, Pathologic; Osteomyelitis; Osteosarcoma; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Clinical studies over the past several years have reported that metastasis-free survival times in humans and dogs with osteosarcoma are significantly increased in patients that develop chronic bacterial osteomyelitis at their surgical site. However, the immunological mechanism by which osteomyelitis may suppress tumor growth has not been investigated. Therefore, we used a mouse model of osteomyelitis to assess the effects of bone infection on innate immunity and tumor growth. A chronic Staphylococcal osteomyelitis model was established in C3H mice and the effects of infection on tumor growth of syngeneic DLM8 osteosarcoma were assessed. The effects of infection on tumor angiogenesis and innate immunity, including NK cell and monocyte responses, were assessed. We found that osteomyelitis significantly inhibited the growth of tumors in mice, and that the effect was independent of the infecting bacterial type, tumor type, or mouse strain. Depletion of NK cells or monocytes reversed the antitumor activity elicited by infection. Moreover, infected mice had a significant increase in circulating monocytes and numbers of tumor associated macrophages. Infection suppressed tumor angiogenesis but did not affect the numbers of circulating endothelial cells. Therefore, we concluded that chronic localized bacterial infection could elicit significant systemic antitumor activity dependent on NK cells and macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19701748
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9980
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