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      1. Author :
        Bondareva, A.; Downey, C. M.; Ayres, F.; Liu, W.; Boyd, S. K.; Hallgrimsson, B.; Jirik, F. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        4
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Lysyl oxidase (LOX), an extracellular matrix remodeling enzyme, appears to have a role in promoting breast cancer cell motility and invasiveness. In addition, increased LOX expression has been correlated with decreases in both metastases-free, and overall survival in breast cancer patients. With this background, we studied the ability of beta-aminopropionitrile (BAPN), an irreversible inhibitor of LOX, to regulate the metastatic colonization potential of the human breast cancer cell line, MDA-MB-231. BAPN was administered daily to mice starting either 1 day prior, on the same day as, or 7 days after intracardiac injection of luciferase expressing MDA-MB-231-Luc2 cells. Development of metastases was monitored by in vivo bioluminescence imaging, and tumor-induced osteolysis was assessed by micro-computed tomography (microCT). We found that BAPN administration was able to reduce the frequency of metastases. Thus, when BAPN treatment was initiated the day before, or on the same day as the intra-cardiac injection of tumor cells, the number of metastases was decreased by 44%, and 27%, and whole-body photon emission rates (reflective of total tumor burden) were diminished by 78%, and 45%, respectively. In contrast, BAPN had no effect on the growth of established metastases. Our findings suggest that LOX activity is required during extravasation and/or initial tissue colonization by circulating MDA-MB-231 cells, lending support to the idea that LOX inhibition might be useful in metastasis prevention.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=19440335
      14. Call Number :
        136327
      15. Serial :
        7869
      1. Author :
        Blagbrough, Ian S; Zara, Chiara
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Pharmaceutical research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        26
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cats; Cattle; Disease Models, Animal; Dna; Dogs; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Fishes; Gene Therapy; Horses; Humans; Mice; PC-3M-luc; Pregnancy; Primates; Rats; RNA, Small Interfering; Sheep; Swine
      12. Abstract :
        Nanoparticles, including lipopolyamines leading to lipoplexes, liposomes, and polyplexes are targeted drug carrier systems in the current search for a successful delivery system for polynucleic acids. This review is focused on the impact of gene and siRNA delivery for studies of efficacy, pharmacodynamics, and pharmacokinetics within the setting of the wide variety of in vivo animal models now used. This critical appraisal of the recent literature sets out the different models that are currently being investigated to bridge from studies in cell lines through towards clinical reality. Whilst many scientists will be familiar with rodent (murine, fecine, cricetine, and musteline) models, few probably think of fish as a clinically relevant animal model, but zebrafish, madake, and rainbow trout are all being used. Larger animal models include rabbit, cat, dog, and cow. Pig is used both for the prevention of foot-and-mouth disease and human diseases, sheep is a model for corneal transplantation, and the horse naturally develops arthritis. Non-human primate models (macaque, common marmoset, owl monkey) are used for preclinical gene vector safety and efficacy trials to bridge the gap prior to clinical studies. We aim for the safe development of clinically effective delivery systems for DNA and RNAi technologies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18841450
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8965
      1. Author :
        BitMansour, A.; Burns, S. M.; Traver, D.; Akashi, K.; Contag, C. H.; Weissman, I. L.; Brown, J. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2002
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        100
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Inhalation, Animals, Animals, Congenic, Aspergillosis/microbiology/*prevention & control, *Aspergillus fumigatus, Cell Lineage, Filgrastim/pharmacology, *Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation, Injections, Intraperitoneal, Luminescent Measurements, Lung Diseases, Fungal/microbiology/*prevention & control, Mice, Mice, Inbred C57BL, Myeloid Progenitor Cells/physiology/*transplantation, Neutropenia/complications/drug therapy, Pseudomonas Infections/microbiology/*prevention & control, Radiation Chimera, Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't, Research Support, U.S. Gov't, P.H.S., Tissue Distribution IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Myelotoxic treatments for oncologic diseases are often complicated by neutropenia, which renders patients susceptible to potentially lethal infections. In these studies of murine hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), cotransplantation of lineage-restricted progenitors known as common myeloid progenitors (CMP) and granulocyte-monocyte progenitors (GMP) protects against death following otherwise lethal challenge with either of 2 pathogens associated with neutropenia: Aspergillus fumigatus and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Cotransplantation of CMP/GMP resulted in a significant and rapid increase in the absolute number of myeloid cells in the spleen, most of which were derived from the donor CMP/GMP. Despite persistent peripheral neutropenia, improved survival correlated with the measurable appearance of progenitor-derived myeloid cells in the spleen. A marked reduction or elimination of tissue pathogen load was confirmed by culture and correlated with survival. Localization of infection by P aeruginosa and extent of disease was also assessed by in vivo bioluminescent imaging using a strain of P aeruginosa engineered to constitutively express a bacterial luciferase. Imaging confirmed that transplantation with a graft containing hematopoietic stem cells and CMP/GMP reduced the bacterial load as early as 18 hours after infection. These results demonstrate that enhanced reconstitution of a tissue myeloid pool offers protection against lethal challenge with serious fungal and bacterial pathogens.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=12393415
      14. Call Number :
        136279
      15. Serial :
        7031
      1. Author :
        Bisland, Stuart K; Chien, Claudia; Wilson, Brian C; Burch, Shane
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Photochemical & photobiological sciences: Official journal of the European Photochemistry Association and the European Society for Photobiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminolevulinic Acid; Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Cell Survival; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Female; Implants, Experimental; Light; Luminescent Measurements; Methylene Blue; Osteomyelitis; Photochemotherapy; Photosensitizing Agents; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Osteomyelitis can lead to severe morbidity and even death resulting from an acute or chronic inflammation of the bone and contiguous structures due to fungal or bacterial infection. Incidence approximates 1 in 1000 neonates and 1 in 5000 children in the United States annually and increases up to 0.36% and 16% in adults with diabetes or sickle cell anaemia, respectively. Current regimens of treatment include antibiotics and/or surgery. However, the increasing number of antibiotic resistant pathogens suggests that alternate strategies are required. We are investigating photodynamic therapy (PDT) as one such alternate treatment for osteomyelitis using a bioluminescent strain of biofilm-producing staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) grown onto kirschner wires (K-wire). S. aureus-coated K-wires were exposed to methylene blue (MB) or 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-mediated PDT either in vitro or following implant into the tibial medullary cavity of Sprague-Dawley rats. The progression of S. aureus biofilm was monitored non-invasively using bioluminescence and expressed as a percentage of the signal for each sample immediately prior to treatment. S. aureus infections were subject to PDT 10 days post inoculation. Treatment comprised administration of ALA (300 mg kg(-1)) intraperitoneally followed 4 h later by light (635 +/- 10 nm; 75 J cm(-2)) delivered transcutaneously via an optical fiber placed onto the tibia and resulted in significant delay in bacterial growth. In vitro, MB and ALA displayed similar cell kill with > or =4 log(10) cell kill. In vivo, ALA-mediated PDT inhibited biofilm implants in bone. These results confirm that MB or ALA-mediated PDT have potential to treat S. aureus cultures grown in vitro or in vivo using an animal model of osteomyelitis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16395425
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9054
      1. Author :
        Bethunaickan, R.; Berthier, C.C.; Ramanujam, M.; Sahu, R.; Zhang, W.; Sun, Y.; Bottinger, E.P.; Ivashkiv, L.; Kretzler, M.; Davidson, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo; kidney; mice; MMPSense 680; ProSense 680
      12. Abstract :
        Renal infiltration with mononuclear cells is associated with poor prognosis in systemic lupus erythematosus. A renal macrophage/dendritic cell signature is associated with the onset of nephritis in NZB/W mice, and immune-modulating therapies can reverse this signature and the associated renal damage despite ongoing immune complex deposition. In nephritic NZB/W mice, renal F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) macrophages are located throughout the interstitium, whereas F4/80(lo)/CD11c(hi) dendritic cells accumulate in perivascular lymphoid aggregates. We show here that F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) renal macrophages have a Gr1(lo)/Ly6C(lo)/VLA4(lo)/MHCII(hi)/CD43(lo)/CD62L(lo) phenotype different from that described for inflammatory macrophages. At nephritis onset, F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) cells upregulate cell surface CD11b, acquire cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase activity, and accumulate large numbers of autophagocytic vacuoles; these changes reverse after the induction of remission. Latex bead labeling of peripheral blood Gr1(lo) monocytes indicates that these are the source of F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) macrophages. CD11c(hi)/MHCII(lo) dendritic cells are found in the kidneys only after proteinuria onset, turnover rapidly, and disappear rapidly after remission induction. Gene expression profiling of the F4/80(hi)/CD11c(int) population displays increased expression of proinflammatory, regulatory, and tissue repair/degradation-associated genes at nephritis onset that reverses with remission induction. Our findings suggest that mononuclear phagocytes with an aberrant activation profile contribute to tissue damage in lupus nephritis by mediating both local inflammation and excessive tissue remodeling.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21411733
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ user @ 8549
      15. Serial :
        4801
      1. Author :
        Bernthal, N. M.; Stavrakis, A. I.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Kremen, T. J.; Simon, S. I.; Cheung, A. L.; Finerman, G. A.; Lieberman, J. R.; Adams, J. S.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/*therapeutic use; Arthroplasty/*adverse effects; Disease Models, Animal; Humans; Joint Diseases/drug therapy/*microbiology/surgery; Joints/microbiology/surgery; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Minocycline/therapeutic use; Postoperative Complications/drug therapy/microbiology/*prevention &; control; Prostheses and Implants; Rifampin/therapeutic use; Staphylococcal Infections/drug therapy/microbiology/*prevention &; control/surgery; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/genetics/*physiology
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND: Post-arthroplasty infections represent a devastating complication of total joint replacement surgery, resulting in multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic use, extended disability and worse clinical outcomes. As the number of arthroplasties in the U.S. will exceed 3.8 million surgeries per year by 2030, the number of post-arthroplasty infections is projected to increase to over 266,000 infections annually. The treatment of these infections will exhaust healthcare resources and dramatically increase medical costs. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To evaluate novel preventative therapeutic strategies against post-arthroplasty infections, a mouse model was developed in which a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain was inoculated into a knee joint containing an orthopaedic implant and advanced in vivo imaging was used to measure the bacterial burden in real-time. Mice inoculated with 5x10(3) and 5x10(4) CFUs developed increased bacterial counts with marked swelling of the affected leg, consistent with an acute joint infection. In contrast, mice inoculated with 5x10(2) CFUs developed a low-grade infection, resembling a more chronic infection. Ex vivo bacterial counts highly correlated with in vivo bioluminescence signals and EGFP-neutrophil fluorescence of LysEGFP mice was used to measure the infection-induced inflammation. Furthermore, biofilm formation on the implants was visualized at 7 and 14 postoperative days by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy (VP-SEM). Using this model, a minocycline/rifampin-impregnated bioresorbable polymer implant coating was effective in reducing the infection, decreasing inflammation and preventing biofilm formation. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Taken together, this mouse model may represent an alternative pre-clinical screening tool to evaluate novel in vivo therapeutic strategies before studies in larger animals and in human subjects. Furthermore, the antibiotic-polymer implant coating evaluated in this study was clinically effective, suggesting the potential for this strategy as a therapeutic intervention to combat post-arthroplasty infections.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20830204
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10447
      1. Author :
        Bernthal, N. M.; Pribaz, J. R.; Stavrakis, A. I.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Ramos, R. I.; Francis, K. P.; Iwakura, Y.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Orthop Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen36, Xen 36, Staphylococcus aureus Xen36, IVIS, Animals; Arthroplasty; Biofilms/growth & development; Bone Wires/microbiology; Interleukin-1beta/*metabolism; Male; Mice; Mice, Congenic; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Myeloid Differentiation Factor 88/metabolism; Neutrophil Infiltration; Prosthesis-Related Infections/*immunology/metabolism; Staphylococcal Infections/*immunology/metabolism; Staphylococcus aureus; Toll-Like Receptor 2/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        MyD88 is an adapter molecule that is used by both IL-1R and TLR family members to initiate downstream signaling and promote immune responses. Given that IL-1beta is induced after Staphylococcus aureus infections and TLR2 is activated by S. aureus lipopeptides, we hypothesized that IL-1beta and TLR2 contribute to MyD88-dependent protective immune responses against post-arthroplasty S. aureus infections. To test this hypothesis, we used a mouse model of a post-arthroplasty S. aureus infection to compare the bacterial burden, biofilm formation and neutrophil recruitment in IL-1beta-deficient, TLR2-deficient and wild-type (wt) mice. By using in vivo bioluminescence imaging, we found that the bacterial burden in IL-1beta-deficient mice was 26-fold higher at 1 day after infection and remained 3- to 10-fold greater than wt mice through day 42. In contrast, the bacterial burden in TLR2-deficient mice did not differ from wt mice. In addition, implants harvested from IL-1beta-deficient mice had more biofilm formation and 14-fold higher adherent bacteria compared with those from wt mice. Finally, IL-1beta-deficient mice had approximately 50% decreased neutrophil recruitment to the infected postoperative joints than wt mice. Taken together, these findings suggest a mechanism by which IL-1beta induces neutrophil recruitment to help control the bacterial burden and the ensuing biofilm formation in a post-surgical joint.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21445990
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10411
      1. Author :
        Bendaoud, M.; Vinogradov, E.; Balashova, N. V.; Kadouri, D. E.; Kachlany, S. C.; Kaplan, J. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Bacteriol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        193
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen29, Xen 29, Staphylococcus aureus Xen29, IVISBacterial Physiological Phenomena/drug effects; Bacterial Proteins/genetics/metabolism; Biofilms/*drug effects; *Down-Regulation/drug effects; Fungi/drug effects/physiology; Kingella kingae/chemistry/genetics/*metabolism; Molecular Sequence Data; Polysaccharides, Bacterial/biosynthesis/chemistry/*pharmacology
      12. Abstract :
        Cell-free extracts prepared from Kingella kingae colony biofilms were found to inhibit biofilm formation by Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Candida albicans, and K. kingae. The extracts evidently inhibited biofilm formation by modifying the physicochemical properties of the cell surface, the biofilm matrix, and the substrate. Chemical and biochemical analyses indicated that the biofilm inhibition activity in the K. kingae extract was due to polysaccharide. Structural analyses showed that the extract contained two major polysaccharides. One was a linear polysaccharide with the structure -->6)-alpha-d-GlcNAcp-(1-->5)-beta-d-OclAp-(2-->, which was identical to a capsular polysaccharide produced by Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae serotype 5. The second was a novel linear polysaccharide, designated PAM galactan, with the structure -->3)-beta-d-Galf-(1-->6)-beta-d-Galf-(1-->. Purified PAM galactan exhibited broad-spectrum biofilm inhibition activity. A cluster of three K. kingae genes encoding UDP-galactopyranose mutase (ugm) and two putative galactofuranosyl transferases was sufficient for the synthesis of PAM galactan in Escherichia coli. PAM galactan is one of a growing number of bacterial polysaccharides that exhibit antibiofilm activity. The biological roles and potential technological applications of these molecules remain unknown.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21602333
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10446
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