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      1. Author :
        E.A. te Velde; Th. Veerman; V. Subramaniam; Th. Ruers
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European Journal of Cancer Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Fluorescent; Sentinel node; Probe; Resection; Oncology; Surgery
      12. Abstract :
        Aims and background: Improved visualization of surgical targets inside of the patient helps to improve radical resection of the tumor while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. In order to achieve an image, optical contrast must be generated by properties intrinsic to the tissue, or require the attachment of special visualization labels to the tumor. In this overview the current status of the clinical use of fluorescent dyes and probes are reviewed.

        Methods: In this review, all experimental and clinical studies concerning fluorescent imaging were included. In addition, in the search for the optimal fluorescent imaging modality, all characteristics of a fluorescent dye were described.

        Findings and conclusions: Although the technique of imaging through fluorescence sounds promising and several animal models show efficacy, official approval of these agents for further clinical evaluation, is eagerly awaited.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ejso.com/article/S0748-7983%2809%2900498-3/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4491
      1. Author :
        Domanska, U. M.; Timmer-Bosscha, H.; Nagengast, W. B.; Oude Munnink, T. H.; Kruizinga, R. C.; Ananias, H. J.; Kliphuis, N. M.; Huls, G.; De Vries, E. G.; de Jong, I. J.; Walenkamp, A. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Neoplasia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        14
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        709-18
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3-luc2, Prostate Cancer, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Several in vitro and in vivo models have revealed the key role of CXCR4/CXCL12 axis in tumor-stroma interactions. Stromal cells present in the tumor microenvironment express high levels of CXCL12 protein, directly stimulating proliferation and migration of CXCR4-expressing cancer cells. This specific prosurvival influence of stromal cells on tumor cells is thought to protect them from cytotoxic chemotherapy and is postulated as a possible explanation for the minimal residual disease in hematological and solid cancers. Therefore, CXCR4/CXCL12 signaling is an attractive therapeutic target in cancer, as proven in preclinical leukemia mouse models, where CXCR4 inhibition sensitized cancer cells to conventional chemotherapy. This study investigates whether inhibition of CXCR4 with the specific inhibitor AMD3100 sensitizes human prostate cancer cells to docetaxel. We showed that both mouse and human stromal cell lines have a protective effect on PC3-luc cells by promoting their survival after chemotherapy. Furthermore, we demonstrated that AMD3100 sensitizes PC3-luc cells to docetaxel. In a subcutaneous xenograft mouse model of human prostate carcinoma, we showed that a combination of docetaxel and AMD3100 exerts increased antitumor effect compared with docetaxel alone. We concluded that CXCR4 inhibition chemosensitizes prostate cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo. To explore the relevance of these findings, we analyzed CXCR4 expression levels in human prostate cancer samples. We found that cancer cells present in bone metastatic lesions express higher CXCR4 levels relative to the cells present in primary tumors and lymph node metastatic lesions. These findings underscore the potential of CXCR4 inhibitors as chemosensitizing agents.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22952424
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10507
      1. Author :
        Derwall, M.; Malhotra, R.; Lai, C. S.; Beppu, Y.; Aikawa, E.; Seehra, J. S.; Zapol, W. M.; Bloch, K. D.; Yu, P. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Arterioscler Thromb Vasc Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        32
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Anti-Inflammatory Agents/pharmacology; Antioxidants/pharmacology; Atherosclerosis/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention & control; Bone Morphogenetic Protein Receptors, Type I/metabolism; Bone Morphogenetic Proteins/*antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Cardiovascular Agents/*pharmacology; Cholesterol, LDL/blood; Diet, High-Fat; Disease Models, Animal; Endothelial Cells/drug effects/metabolism; Fatty Liver/etiology/metabolism/prevention & control; Female; Hep G2 Cells; Humans; Lipoproteins, LDL/metabolism; Liver/drug effects/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Pyrazoles/*pharmacology; Pyrimidines/*pharmacology; Reactive Oxygen Species/metabolism; Receptors, LDL/deficiency/genetics; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/metabolism; Signal Transduction/*drug effects; Time Factors; Vascular Calcification/etiology/genetics/metabolism/pathology/*prevention &; control
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The expression of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) is enhanced in human atherosclerotic and calcific vascular lesions. Although genetic gain- and loss-of-function experiments in mice have supported a causal role of BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and vascular calcification, it remains uncertain whether BMP signaling might be targeted pharmacologically to ameliorate both of these processes. METHODS AND RESULTS: We tested the impact of pharmacological BMP inhibition on atherosclerosis and calcification in LDL receptor-deficient (LDLR-/-) mice. LDLR-/- mice fed a high-fat diet developed abundant vascular calcification within 20 weeks. Prolonged treatment of LDLR-/- mice with the small molecule BMP inhibitor LDN-193189 was well-tolerated and potently inhibited development of atheroma, as well as associated vascular inflammation, osteogenic activity, and calcification. Administration of recombinant BMP antagonist ALK3-Fc replicated the antiatherosclerotic and anti-inflammatory effects of LDN-193189. Treatment of human aortic endothelial cells with LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc abrogated the production of reactive oxygen species induced by oxidized LDL, a known early event in atherogenesis. Unexpectedly, treatment of mice with LDN-193189 lowered LDL serum cholesterol by 35% and markedly decreased hepatosteatosis without inhibiting HMG-CoA reductase activity. Treatment with BMP2 increased, whereas LDN-193189 or ALK3-Fc inhibited apolipoprotein B100 secretion in HepG2 cells, suggesting that BMP signaling contributes to the regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis. CONCLUSION: These results definitively implicate BMP signaling in atherosclerosis and calcification, while uncovering a previously unidentified role for BMP signaling in LDL cholesterol metabolism. BMP inhibition may be helpful in the treatment of atherosclerosis and associated vascular calcification.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22223731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10469
      1. Author :
        Dernell, William S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        N/A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        *Breast Cancer; *Chemotherapy; *Genes; *Luciferase; Anatomy and Physiology; Biochemistry; Bioware; Cells(Biology); Diseases; Drugs; Efficacy; Gel Polymers; Gels; Growth(Physiology); Humans; Image Processing; In Vitro Analysis.; In Vivo Analysis; Luciferase Genes; Medicine and Medical Research; Metastasis; Mouse Models; Paclitaxel Sensitivity; Poloxamer Polymers; Polymers; Preclinical Evaluations; surgery; Synergism; Toxicity; Tumor Cell Lines
      12. Abstract :
        This project evaluated paclitaxel chemotherapy delivery from a gel polymer system placed into a wound bed following conservative (marginal) surgical removal of human breast cancers grown in nude mice. This delivery method was shown to control local tumor disease as well as assist in control of systemic metastasis. We established 5 human breast cancer cell lines within our laboratory. We elected purchase and implement a unique (luciferase) imaging system which allows in vivo imaging of tumor growth and metastasis (and subsequently decrease animal use). Tumor cell lines were transfected with the luciferase gene. In vitro testing of cell lines established paclitaxel sensitivity and showed a synergistic effect of delivering paclitaxel by the poloxamer polymer, especially for the chemotherapy resistant cell line, MCF-7-ADR. We completed the simultaneous evaluation of local and systemic toxicity, local, regional and systemic distribution and local and systemic efficacy of locally delivered paclitaxel chemotherapy following tumor removal using the MCF-7-ADR cell line in nude mice. Intracavitary administration of taxol in poloxamer was well tolerated (locally and systemically) afld resulted in significantly improved control of local tumor regrowth and comparable control of metastasis following marginal tumor removal as compared to intravenous paclitaxel (parent drug) . Sustained drug levels (from polymer delivery) were seen in plasma and liver tissue at 60 days.
      13. URL :
        http://oai.dtic.mil/oai/oai?verb=getRecord&metadataPrefix=html&identifier=ADA437225
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8994
      1. Author :
        Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Grandjean, M.; Dieu, M.; Raes, M.; Hatzopoulos, A. K.; Kupatt, C.; Feron, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor progression is associated with the release of signaling substances from the primary tumor into the bloodstream. Tumor-derived cytokines are known to promote the mobilization and the recruitment of cells from the bone marrow, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Here, we examined whether such paracrine influence could also influence the capacity of EPC to interfere with circulating metastatic cells. We therefore consecutively injected EPC pre-stimulated by tumor conditioned medium (CM-EPC) and luciferase-expressing B16 melanoma cells to mice. A net decrease in metastases spreading (vs non-stimulated EPC) led us to carry out a 2D-DIGE proteomic study to identify possible mediators of EPC-driven protection. Among 33 proteins exhibiting significant changes in expression, SPARC presented the highest induction after EPC exposure to CM. We then showed that contrary to control EPC, SPARC-silenced EPC were not able to reduce the extent of metastases when injected with B16 melanoma cells. Using adhesion tests and the hanging drop assay, we further documented that cell-cell interactions between CM-EPC and melanoma cells were promoted in a SPARC-dependent manner. This interaction led to the engulfment of melanoma cells by CM-EPC, a process prevented by SPARC silencing and mimicked by recombinant SPARC. Finally, we showed that contrary to melanoma cells, the pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231-D3H2 reduced SPARC expression in human EPC and stimulated metastases spreading. Our findings unravel the influence of tumor cells on EPC phenotypes through a SPARC-driven accentuation of macrophagic capacity associated with limitations to metastatic spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21616936
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10354
      1. Author :
        Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Grandjean, M.; Dieu, M.; Raes, M.; Hatzopoulos, A. K.; Kupatt, C.; Feron, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor progression is associated with the release of signaling substances from the primary tumor into the bloodstream. Tumor-derived cytokines are known to promote the mobilization and the recruitment of cells from the bone marrow, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Here, we examined whether such paracrine influence could also influence the capacity of EPC to interfere with circulating metastatic cells. We therefore consecutively injected EPC pre-stimulated by tumor conditioned medium (CM-EPC) and luciferase-expressing B16 melanoma cells to mice. A net decrease in metastases spreading (vs non-stimulated EPC) led us to carry out a 2D-DIGE proteomic study to identify possible mediators of EPC-driven protection. Among 33 proteins exhibiting significant changes in expression, SPARC presented the highest induction after EPC exposure to CM. We then showed that contrary to control EPC, SPARC-silenced EPC were not able to reduce the extent of metastases when injected with B16 melanoma cells. Using adhesion tests and the hanging drop assay, we further documented that cell-cell interactions between CM-EPC and melanoma cells were promoted in a SPARC-dependent manner. This interaction led to the engulfment of melanoma cells by CM-EPC, a process prevented by SPARC silencing and mimicked by recombinant SPARC. Finally, we showed that contrary to melanoma cells, the pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231-D3H2 reduced SPARC expression in human EPC and stimulated metastases spreading. Our findings unravel the influence of tumor cells on EPC phenotypes through a SPARC-driven accentuation of macrophagic capacity associated with limitations to metastatic spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21616936
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10415
      1. Author :
        De Kwaadsteniet, Michele
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        N/A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Antibiotics -- Therapeutic use; Bacteriocins; Bioware; Dissertations -- Microbiology; Drug resistance in microorganisms; Nisin; Respiratory infections -- Treatment; Skin -- Infections -- Treatment; Staphylococcus aureus; Theses -- Microbiology; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Multidrug resistant strains of Staphylococcus aureus is presenting an increasing threat, especially immune compromised individuals. Many of these strains have developed resistance to newly approved drugs such as quinupristin-dalfopristin, linezolid and daptomycin. The search for alternative treatment, including bacteriocins (ribosomally synthesized antimicrobial peptides) of lactic acid bacteria is increasing . Lactococcus lactis subsp. lactis F10, isolated from freshwater catfish, produced a new nisin variant active against clinical strains of S. aureus. The operon encoding nisin F is located on a plasmid and the structural gene has been sequenced. The lantibiotic is closely related to nisin Z, except at position 30 where valine replaced isoleucine. The antimicrobial activity of nisin F against S. aureus was tested in the respiratory tract of Wistar rats. Non-immunosuppressed and immunosuppressed rats were intranasally infected with S. aureus K and then treated with either nisin F or sterile physiological saline. Nisin F protected immunosuppressed rats against S. aureus, as symptoms of an infection were only detected in the trachea and lungs of immunosuppressed rats treated with saline. The safety of intranasally administered nisin F was also evaluated and proved to have no adverse side effects. The potential of nisin F as an antimicrobial agent to treat subcutaneous skin infections was evaluated by infecting C57BL/6 mice with a bioluminescent strain of S. aureus (Xen 36). Immunosuppressed mice were treated with either nisin F or sterile physiological saline 24 h and 48 h after infection with subcutaneously injected S. aureus Xen 36. Histology and bioluminescence flux measurements revealed that nisin F was ineffective in the treatment of deep dermal staphylococcal infections. Non-infected and infected mice treated with nisin F had an influx of polymorphonuclear cells in the deep stroma of the skin tissue. This suggested that nisin F, when injected subcutaneously, may have modulated the immune system. Nisin F proved an effective antimicrobial agent against S. aureus-related infections in the respiratory tract, but not against subcutaneous infections. The outcome of nisin F treatment thus depends on the route of administration and site of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://scholar.sun.ac.za/handle/10019.1/1285
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9042
      1. Author :
        David G Kirsch; Daniela M Dinulescu; John B Miller; Jan Grimm; Philip M Santiago1; Nathan P Young; G Petur Nielsen; Bradley J Quade; Christopher J Chaber; Christian P Schultz; Osamu Takeuchi; Roderick T Bronson; Denise Crowley; Stanley J Korsmeyer; Sam S Yoon; Francis J Hornicek; Ralph Weissleder; Tyler Jacks
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Nature Medicine
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        sarcoma; imaging; apoptosis; metatasis; FMT
      12. Abstract :
        Soft tissue sarcomas are mesenchymal tumors that are fatal in approximately one-third of patients. To explore mechanisms of sarcoma pathogenesis, we have generated a mouse model of soft tissue sarcoma. Intramuscular delivery of an adenovirus expressing Cre recombinase in mice with conditional mutations in Kras and Trp53 was sufficient to initiate high-grade sarcomas with myofibroblastic differentiation. Like human sarcomas, these tumors show a predilection for lung rather than lymph node metastasis. Using this model, we showed that a prototype handheld imaging device can identify residual tumor during intraoperative molecular imaging. Deletion of the Ink4a-Arf locus (Cdkn2a), but not Bak1 and Bax, could substitute for mutation of Trp53 in this model. Deletion of Bak1 and Bax, however, was able to substitute for mutation of Trp53 in the development of sinonasal adenocarcinoma. Therefore, the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis seems sufficient to mediate p53 tumor suppression in an epithelial cancer, but not in this model of soft tissue sarcoma.
      13. URL :
        http://www.nature.com/nm/journal/v13/n8/abs/nm1602.html
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4506
      1. Author :
        David E Sosnovik, Matthias Nahrendorf and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Nature Reviews Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; fluorescence imaging, molecular imaging, MRI, myocardium, SPECT; MMPSense
      12. Abstract :
        Molecular imaging agents can be targeted to a specific receptor or protein on the cardiomyocyte surface, or to enzymes released into the interstitial space, such as cathepsins, matrix metalloproteinases and myeloperoxidase. Molecular imaging of the myocardium, however, requires the imaging agent to be small, sensitive (nanomolar levels or better), and able to gain access to the interstitial space. Several novel agents that fulfill these criteria have been used for targeted molecular imaging applications in the myocardium. Magnetic resonance, fluorescence, and single-photon emission CT have been used to image the molecular signals generated by these agents. The use of targeted imaging agents in the myocardium has the potential to provide valuable insights into the pathophysiology of myocardial injury and to facilitate the development of novel therapeutic strategies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2597275/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4650
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