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      1. Author :
        Noberini, R.; Rubio de la Torre, E.; Pasquale, E. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cell Adh Migr
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Chromatography, Liquid; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Ephrins/genetics/*metabolism; Humans; Mass Spectrometry/*methods; Mice; Receptor, EphA1/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family includes many members, which are often expressed together in various combinations and can promiscuously interact with multiple ephrin ligands, generating intricate networks of intracellular signals that control physiological and pathological processes. Knowing the entire repertoire of Eph receptors and ephrins expressed in a biological sample is important when studying their biological roles. Moreover, given the correlation between Eph receptor/ephrin expression and cancer pathogenesis, their expression patterns could serve important diagnostic and prognostic purposes. However, profiling Eph receptor and ephrin expression has been challenging. Here we describe a novel and straightforward approach to catalog the Eph receptors present in cultured cells and tissues. By measuring the binding of ephrin Fc fusion proteins to Eph receptors in ELISA and pull-down assays, we determined that a mixture of four ephrins is suitable for isolating both EphA and EphB receptors in a single pull-down. We then used mass spectrometry to identify the Eph receptors present in the pull-downs and estimate their relative levels. This approach was validated in cultured human cancer cell lines, human tumor xenograft tissue grown in mice, and mouse brain tissue. The new mass spectrometry approach we have developed represents a useful tool for the identification of the spectrum of Eph receptors present in a biological sample and could also be extended to profiling ephrin expression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22568954
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10538
      1. Author :
        Noberini, R.; Koolpe, M.; Lamberto, I.; Pasquale, E. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Pharmacol Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        66
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Animals; COS Cells; Catechin/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology; Cell Line; Cercopithecus aethiops; Ephrins/*metabolism; Mice; Polyphenols/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Protein Binding/drug effects; Protein Interaction Maps/*drug effects; Receptor, EphA4/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Receptors, Eph Family/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry/pharmacology; Tea/*chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Tea contains a variety of bioactive chemicals, such as catechins and other polyphenols. These compounds are thought to be responsible for the health benefits of tea consumption by affecting the function of many cellular targets, not all of which have been identified. In a high-throughput screen for small molecule antagonists of the EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase, we identified five tea polyphenols that substantially inhibit EphA4 binding to a synthetic peptide ligand. Further characterization of theaflavin monogallates from black tea and epigallocatechin-3,5-digallate from green tea revealed that these compounds at low micromolar concentrations also inhibit binding of the natural ephrin ligands to EphA4 and several other Eph receptors in in vitro assays. The compounds behave as competitive EphA4 antagonists, and their inhibitory activity is affected by amino acid mutations within the ephrin binding pocket of EphA4. In contrast, the major green tea catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), does not appear to be an effective Eph receptor antagonist. In cell culture assays, theaflavin monogallates and epigallocatechin-3,5-digallate inhibit ephrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of Eph receptors and endothelial capillary-like tube formation. However, the wider spectrum of Eph receptors affected by the tea derivatives in cells suggests additional mechanisms of inhibition besides interfering with ephrin binding. These results show that tea polyphenols derived from both black and green tea can suppress the biological activities of Eph receptors. Thus, the Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family represents an important class of targets for tea-derived phytochemicals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22750215
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10533
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Sequence; Animals; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides; Bacterial Infections; Bioware; Cell Line; Cells, Cultured; Chemokine CCL2; Chemokine CCL7; Chemokine CXCL1; Chemokines; Female; Humans; Interleukin-8; Leukocytes; Leukocytes, Mononuclear; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Molecular Sequence Data; NF-kappa B; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Phosphorylation; Staphylococcal Infections; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen29, Xen14
      12. Abstract :
        With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study, an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor and the PI3K, NF-kappaB, and MAPK signaling pathways. The protective activity of the peptide was associated with in vivo augmentation of chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of infection. These results highlight the importance of the chemokine induction activity of host defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107187
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9033
      1. Author :
        Nijnik, A.; Madera, L.; Ma, S.; Waldbrook, M.; Elliott, M. R.; Easton, D. M.; Mayer, M. L.; Mullaly, S. C.; Kindrachuk, J.; Jenssen, H.; Hancock, R. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Amino Acid Sequence; Animals; Antimicrobial Cationic Peptides/chemical synthesis/*pharmacology; Bacterial Infections/*metabolism/microbiology/prevention & control; Cell Line; Cells, Cultured; Chemokine CCL2/metabolism; Chemokine CCL7/metabolism; Chemokine CXCL1/metabolism; Chemokines/*metabolism; Female; Humans; Interleukin-8/metabolism; Leukocytes/cytology/*metabolism; Leukocytes, Mononuclear/cytology/drug effects/metabolism; Macrophages/cytology/drug effects/metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Molecular Sequence Data; NF-kappa B/metabolism; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism; Phosphorylation/drug effects; Staphylococcal Infections/microbiology/prevention & control; Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects; p38 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        With the rapid rise in the incidence of multidrug resistant infections, there is substantial interest in host defense peptides as templates for production of new antimicrobial therapeutics. Natural peptides are multifunctional mediators of the innate immune response, with some direct antimicrobial activity and diverse immunomodulatory properties. We have previously developed an innate defense regulator (IDR) 1, with protective activity against bacterial infection mediated entirely through its effects on the immunity of the host, as a novel approach to anti-infective therapy. In this study, an immunomodulatory peptide IDR-1002 was selected from a library of bactenecin derivatives based on its substantially more potent ability to induce chemokines in human PBMCs. The enhanced chemokine induction activity of the peptide in vitro correlated with stronger protective activity in vivo in the Staphylococcus aureus-invasive infection model, with a >5-fold reduction in the protective dose in direct comparison with IDR-1. IDR-1002 also afforded protection against the Gram-negative bacterial pathogen Escherichia coli. Chemokine induction by IDR-1002 was found to be mediated through a Gi-coupled receptor and the PI3K, NF-kappaB, and MAPK signaling pathways. The protective activity of the peptide was associated with in vivo augmentation of chemokine production and recruitment of neutrophils and monocytes to the site of infection. These results highlight the importance of the chemokine induction activity of host defense peptides and demonstrate that the optimization of the ex vivo chemokine-induction properties of peptides is a promising method for the rational development of immunomodulatory IDR peptides with enhanced anti-infective activity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20107187
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10393
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Blotting, Western, Xen26, Cell Line, Tumor, Diagnostic Imaging/methods, Gene Therapy/*methods, Genetic Engineering/*methods, Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neoplasms/*therapy, Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics, bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20028866
      14. Call Number :
        141643
      15. Serial :
        6246
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging/methods; Gene Therapy/*methods; Genetic Engineering/*methods; Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasms/*therapy; Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics; bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20028866
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10560
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, Leslie; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Painter, Cory L; Zhang, Cathy; Rahavendran, Sadayappan V; Shen, Zhongzhou
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chromatography, Liquid; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4; Drug Stability; Female; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms, Experimental; Piperazines; Protein kinase inhibitors; Pyridines; Sensitivity and Specificity; Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Phase II attrition of clinical candidates in the drug development cycle is currently a major issue facing the pharmaceutical industry. To decrease phase II attrition, there is an increased emphasis on validation of mechanism of action, development of efficacy models and measurement of drug levels at the site of action. PD 0332991, a highly specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK-4) is currently in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumor. A clinical presurgical study will be required to better understand how PD 0332991 affects signaling pathways and how the intratumoral concentration of PD 0332991 correlates with plasma PK parameters and molecular alterations in breast cancer tissues after PD 0332991 treatment. Before conducting such a clinical study, it is important to evaluate PD 0332991 levels in tumor tissue samples from a xenograft mouse model for the determination of drug exposure at the site of action. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to develop and validate a sensitive LC-MS/MS method to quantify PD 0332991 in mouse tumor tissues from MDA-MB-231-Luc human breast tumor xenografts in SCID-beige mice; (2) to quantify PD 0332991 levels in mouse tumor tissues after oral administration of PD 0332991 at 10 and 100mg/kg using the validated LC-MS/MS method. Both liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and supported liquid extraction (SLE) in a 96-well format were developed and evaluated to achieve optimal extraction recovery with minimal matrix effects. The newly developed SLE method is more efficient (speed and ease) and demonstrates comparable recovery (93.1-100% at three different concentrations) compared to the traditional LLE method. The validated LC-MS/MS for PD 032291 in mouse tumor tissue homogenate method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.1-100 ng/mL with inter-day accuracy and precision within 15%. The validated method was successfully applied to measure PD 0332991 levels in tumor tissues in MDA-MB-231-Luc human breast tumor xenografts in SCID beige mice. The mean tumor concentrations at 6h post-oral PD 0332991 administration at 10 and 100mg/kg were 1793 (+/-1008) and 25,163 (+/-3959) ng/g, respectively.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236782
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8987
      1. Author :
        Nejadnik, M Reza; Engelsman, Anton F; Saldarriaga Fernandez, Isabel C; Busscher, Henk J; Norde, Willem; van der Mei, Henny C
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of antimicrobial chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        62
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Colony Count, Microbial; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Polymers; Prostheses and Implants; Rifampin; Silicone Elastomers; Staphylococcus aureus; Vancomycin; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVES Curing biomaterial-associated infection (BAI) frequently includes antibiotic treatment, implant removal and re-implantation. However, revision implants are at a greater risk of infection as they may attract bacteria from their infected surroundings. Polymer brush-coatings attract low numbers of bacteria, but the virtue of polymer brush-coatings in vivo has seldom been investigated. Here, we determine the possible benefits of polymer brush-coated versus pristine silicone rubber in revision surgery, using a murine model. METHODS BAI was induced in 26 mice by subcutaneous implantation of silicone rubber discs with a biofilm of Staphylococcus aureus Xen29. During the development of BAI, half of the mice received rifampicin/vancomycin treatment. After 5 days, the infected discs were removed from all mice, and either a polymer brush-coated or pristine silicone rubber disc was re-implanted. Revision discs were explanted after 5 days, and the number of cfu cultured from the discs and the surrounding tissue was determined. RESULTS None of the polymer brush-coated discs after antibiotic treatment appeared colonized by staphylococci, whereas 83% of the pristine silicone rubber discs were re-infected. Polymer brush-coated discs also showed reduced colonization rates in the absence of antibiotic treatment when compared with pristine silicone rubber discs. Tissue surrounding the discs was culture-positive in all cases. CONCLUSIONS Polymer brush-coatings are less prone to re-infection than pristine silicone rubber when used in revision surgery, i.e. when implanted in a subcutaneous pocket infected by a staphylococcal BAI. Antibiotic pre-treatment during the development of BAI hardly had any effect in preventing the colonization of pristine silicone rubber.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18812426
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9045
      1. Author :
        Neben, Tamlyn Yee; Clermont, Anne O.; Esposito, Lin; Oei, Yoko; Neben, Tamlyn Yee; Jenkins, Darlene E.; Clermont, Anne O.; Esposito, Lin; Oei, Yoko; Jenkins, Darlene E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        AACR Meeting Abstracts
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2005
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Lovo-6-luc-1 cells
      12. Abstract :
        Colorectal cancer is the fourth most common cancer in the United States with an estimated 130,000 new cases diagnosed each year. Many cases are asymptomatic and not diagnosed until late stage of disease. Identification of primary tumors at an earlier stage is advantageous in treatment planning and aids in decreasing the morbidity/mortality rate from recurrence. The aim of our studies is to establish a xenograft system for monitoring tumor growth and metastasis in vivo which allows continual evaluation of drug and drug regimen efficacy at all stages of tumor progression. LoVo-6-luc-1, a luciferase expressing cell line derived from LoVo human colorectal adenocarcinoma cells, was injected by various routes (subcutaneous, intraperitoneal and intracecal) into female SCID-bg mice. Tumor growth and metastatic spread was monitored weekly by in vivo imaging using the Xenogen IVISTM imaging platform. Visible bioluminescence signals were detected immediately after injection and high tumor take was seen in all of the models. In the subcutaneous model, we found a high correlation between mean bioluminescence and mean tumor volume. In the intraperitoneal and ceacum injected models, the onset of tumor spread was rapid and ex vivo imaging confirmed metastasis to multiple organs such as liver, lung, kidney, adrenal gland, spleen and ovary.
      13. URL :
        http://www.aacrmeetingabstracts.org/cgi/content/abstract/2005/1/908-d
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9016
      1. Author :
        Neal, Robert E, 2nd; Singh, Ravi; Hatcher, Heather C; Kock, Nancy D; Torti, Suzy V; Davalos, Rafael V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Breast cancer research and treatment
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        123
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Electrochemotherapy; Electrodes; Female; Humans; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Needles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Irreversible electroporation (IRE) is a therapeutic technology for the ablation of soft tissues using electrodes to deliver intense but short electric pulses across a cell membrane, creating nanopores that lead to cell death. This phenomenon only affects the cell membrane, leaving the extracellular matrix and sensitive structures intact, making it a promising technique for the treatment many types of tumors. In this paper, we present the first in vivo study to achieve tumor regression using a translatable, clinically relevant single needle electrode for treatment administration. Numerical models of the electric field distribution for the protocol used suggest that a 1000 V/cm field threshold is sufficient to treat a tumor, and that the electric field distribution will slightly decrease if the same protocol were used on a tumor deep seated within a human breast. Tumor regression was observed in 5 out of 7 MDA-MB231 human mammary tumors orthotopically implanted in female Nu/Nu mice, with continued growth in controls.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20191380
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8988
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