1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Headers act as filters

  • Records
      1. Author :
        Arima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Sasaki, M.; Hosonaga, M.; Goto, T. M.; Chiyoda, T.; Kuninaka, S.; Shibata, T.; Ohata, H.; Nakagama, H.; Taya, Y.; Saya, H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously showed that depletion of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) induces down-regulation of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin and thereby triggers the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). To further characterize the effect of RB inactivation on the phenotype of cancer cells, we have now examined RB expression in human breast cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. We found that RB-inactive cells exhibit a mesenchymal-like morphology and are highly invasive. We also found that ZEB proteins, transcriptional repressors of the E-cadherin gene, are markedly up-regulated in these cells in a manner sensitive to the miR-200 family of microRNAs. Moreover, depletion of ZEB in RB-inactive cells suppressed cell invasiveness and proliferation as well as induced epithelial marker expression. These results implicate ZEB in induction of the EMT as well as in maintenance of the mesenchymal phenotype in RB-inactive cells. We also developed a screening program for inhibitors of ZEB1 expression and thereby identified several cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors that blocked both ZEB1 expression and RB phosphorylation. Together, our findings suggest that RB inactivation contributes to tumor progression not only through loss of cell cycle control but also through up-regulation of ZEB expression and induction of an invasive phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22262832
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10418
      1. Author :
        Apidianakis, Y.; Mindrinos, M. N.; Xiao, W.; Tegos, G. P.; Papisov, M. I.; Hamblin, M. R.; Davis, R. W.; Tompkins, R. G.; Rahme, L. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in our understanding the pathophysiology of trauma, the basis of the predisposition of trauma patients to infection remains unclear. A Drosophila melanogaster/Pseudomonas aeruginosa injury and infection model was used to identify host genetic components that contribute to the hyper-susceptibility to infection that follows severe trauma. We show that P. aeruginosa compromises skeletal muscle gene (SMG) expression at the injury site to promote infection. We demonstrate that activation of SMG structural components is under the control of cJun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Kinase, Hemipterous (Hep), and activation of this pathway promotes local resistance to P. aeruginosa in flies and mice. Our study links SMG expression and function to increased susceptibility to infection, and suggests that P. aeruginosa affects SMG homeostasis locally by restricting SMG expression in injured skeletal muscle tissue. Local potentiation of these host responses, and/or inhibition of their suppression by virulent P. aeruginosa cells, could lead to novel therapies that prevent or treat deleterious and potentially fatal infections in severely injured individuals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18159239
      14. Call Number :
        135889
      15. Serial :
        6705
      1. Author :
        Alsaadi, M.; Italia, J. L.; Mullen, A. B.; Ravi Kumar, M. N.; Candlish, A. A.; Williams, R. A.; Shaw, C. D.; Al Gawhari, F.; Coombs, G. H.; Wiese, M.; Thomson, A. H.; Puig-Sellart, M.; Wallace, J.; Sharp, A.; Wheeler, L.; Warn, P.; Carter, K. C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Control Release
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        160
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Aerosols; Amphotericin B/*administration & dosage; Animals; Antifungal Agents/*administration & dosage; Cricetinae; Disease Models, Animal; Drug Carriers/*administration & dosage; Female; Firefly Luciferin/administration & dosage; Leishmaniasis/*drug therapy/metabolism/microbiology; Liver/metabolism/microbiology; Lung/metabolism/microbiology; Mesocricetus; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Pulmonary Aspergillosis/*drug therapy/metabolism/microbiology; Rats; Rats, Sprague-Dawley; Surface-Active Agents/*administration & dosage
      12. Abstract :
        Amphotericin B (AMB) is used to treat both fungal and leishmanial infections, which are of major significance to human health. Clinical use of free AMB is limited by its nephrotoxicity, whereas liposomal AMB is costly and requires parenteral administration, thus development of novel formulations with enhanced efficacy, minimal toxicity and that can be applied via non-invasive routes is required. In this study we analysed the potential of non-ionic surfactant vesicles (NIV) given by nebulisation to deliver AMB to the lungs, liver and skin. Treatment with AMB-NIV resulted in significantly higher drug levels in the lungs and skin (p<0.05) compared to similar treatment with AMB solution but significantly lower plasma levels (p<0.05). Treatment with AMB-NIV resulted in a significant reduction in fungal lung burdens in a rat model of invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (p<0.05) compared to treatment with the carrier alone. Treatment with AMB-NIV but not AMB solution significantly suppressed Leishmania donovani liver parasite burdens (p<0.05) but could not inhibit the growth of cutaneous Leishmania major lesions. The results of this study indicate that aerosolised NIV enhanced pulmonary and hepatic delivery whilst minimising systemic exposure and toxicity.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22516093
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10528
      1. Author :
        Ale, A.; Ermolayev, V.; Herzog, E.; Cohrs, C.; de Angelis, M. H.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Methods
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bone Remodeling; Disease Models, Animal; Equipment Design; Female; Fluorescence; Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/radiography; Mice; Osteogenesis Imperfecta/pathology/radiography; Tomography, Optical/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360 degrees imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561987
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 29
      15. Serial :
        10363
      1. Author :
        Ale, A.; Ermolayev, V.; Herzog, E.; Cohrs, C.; de Angelis, M. H.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Methods
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Remodeling; Disease Models, Animal; Equipment Design; Female; Fluorescence; Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/radiography; Mice; Osteogenesis Imperfecta/pathology/radiography; Tomography, Optical/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360 degrees imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561987
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10468
      1. Author :
        Albanesi, M.; Mancardi, D. A.; Macdonald, L. E.; Iannascoli, B.; Zitvogel, L.; Murphy, A. J.; Leusen, J. H.; Bruhns, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        mAb therapy for experimental metastatic melanoma relies on activating receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcgammaR). Opposing results on the respective contribution of mouse FcgammaRI, FcgammaRIII, and FcgammaRIV have been reported using the gp75-expressing B16 melanoma and the protective anti-gp75 mAb TA99. We analyzed the contribution of FcgammaRs to this therapy model using bioluminescent measurement of lung metastases loads, novel mouse strains, and anti-FcgammaR blocking mAbs. We found that the TA99 mAb-mediated effects in a combination therapy using cyclophosphamide relied on activating FcgammaRs. The combination therapy, however, was not more efficient than mAb therapy alone. We demonstrate that FcgammaRI and, unexpectedly, FcgammaRIII contributed to TA99 mAb therapeutic effects, whereas FcgammaRIV did not. Therefore, FcgammaRIII and FcgammaRI are, together, responsible for anti-gp75 mAb therapy of B16 lung metastases. Our finding that mouse FcgammaRIII contributes to Ab-induced tumor reduction correlates with clinical data on its human functional equivalent human FcgammaRIIIA (CD16A).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23150715
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10482
      1. Author :
        Al Marzouqi, N.; Iratni, R.; Nemmar, A.; Arafat, K.; Ahmed Al Sultan, M.; Yasin, J.; Collin, P.; Mester, J.; Adrian, T. E.; Attoub, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Eur J Pharmacol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Breast cancer is a major challenge for pharmacologists to develop new drugs to improve the survival of cancer patients. Frondoside A is a triterpenoid glycoside isolated from the sea cucumber, Cucumaria frondosa. It has been demonstrated that Frondoside A inhibited the growth of pancreatic cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. We investigated the impact of Frondoside A on human breast cancer cell survival, migration and invasion in vitro, and on tumor growth in nude mice, using the human estrogen receptor-negative breast cancer cell line MDA-MB-231. The non-tumorigenic MCF10-A cell line derived from normal human mammary epithelium was used as control. Frondoside A (0.01-5muM) decreased the viability of breast cancer cells in a concentration- and time-dependent manner, with 50%-effective concentration (EC50) of 2.5muM at 24h. MCF10-A cells were more resistant to the cytotoxic effect of Frondoside A (EC50 superior to 5muM at 24h). In the MDA-MB-231 cells, Frondoside A effectively increased the sub-G1 (apoptotic) cell fraction through the activation of p53, and subsequently the caspases 9 and 3/7 cell death pathways. In addition, Frondoside A induced a concentration-dependent inhibition of MDA-MB-231 cell migration and invasion. In vivo, Frondoside A (100mug/kg/dayi.p. for 24days) strongly decreased the growth of MDA-MB-231 tumor xenografts in athymic mice, without manifest toxic side-effects. Moreover, we found that Frondoside A could enhance the killing of breast cancer cells induced by the chemotherapeutic agent paclitaxel. These findings identify Frondoside A as a promising novel therapeutic agent for breast cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21741966
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10490