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      1. Author :
        Cheung, R.; Shen, F.; Phillips, J. H.; McGeachy, M. J.; Cua, D. J.; Heyworth, P. G.; Pierce, R. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Clin Invest
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism; Animals; Cell Differentiation; Concanavalin A/toxicity; Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/etiology; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Immunity, Innate; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism; Lectins, C-Type/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Liver/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Models, Immunological; Myeloid Cells/*immunology/pathology; Nitric Oxide/biosynthesis; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/metabolism; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism; Receptors, Cell Surface/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism; Shock/*etiology/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Signal Transduction; Systemic Inflammatory Response; Syndrome/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis
      12. Abstract :
        Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a potentially lethal condition, as it can progress to shock, multi-organ failure, and death. It can be triggered by infection, tissue damage, or hemorrhage. The role of tissue injury in the progression from SIRS to shock is incompletely understood. Here, we show that treatment of mice with concanavalin A (ConA) to induce liver injury triggered a G-CSF-dependent hepatic infiltration of CD11b+Gr-1+Ly6G+Ly6C+ immature myeloid cells that expressed the orphan receptor myeloid DAP12-associated lectin-1 (MDL-1; also known as CLEC5A). Activation of MDL-1 using dengue virus or an agonist MDL-1-specific antibody in the ConA-treated mice resulted in shock. The MDL-1+ cells were pathogenic, and in vivo depletion of MDL-1+ cells provided protection. Triggering MDL-1 on these cells induced production of NO and TNF-alpha, which were found to be elevated in the serum of treated mice and required for MDL-1-induced shock. Surprisingly, MDL-1-induced NO and TNF-alpha production required eNOS but not iNOS. Activation of DAP12, DAP10, Syk, PI3K, and Akt was critical for MDL-1-induced shock. In addition, Akt physically interacted with and activated eNOS. Therefore, triggering of MDL-1 on immature myeloid cells and production of NO and TNF-alpha may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of shock. Targeting the MDL-1/Syk/PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway represents a potential new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of SIRS to shock.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005300
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10421
      1. Author :
        Cheung, Alison M.; Brown, Allison S.; Shaked, Yuval; Franco, Marcela; Kerbel, Robert S.; Foster, F. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        AACR Meeting Abstracts
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2006
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; PC-3M-luc; hVEGF-luc-PC3M
      12. Abstract :
        Background: Preclinical cancer studies increasingly utilize non-invasive imaging modalities. In the current study we have monitored tumor growth and vascular changes using two in vivo imaging tools: surface bioluminescence (BLI) and ultrasound biomicroscopy (UBM). BLI permits visualization of tumor location in the context of the whole body, including metastases localization. UBM imaging then permits high resolution 3D volumetric tumor measurements as well as blood flow estimates down to 200 microns/s. Measurements obtained from these complementary modalities were analyzed and compared to conventional, biochemical markers. Methods: Human prostate cancer cells expressing Firefly Luciferase constitutively (PC-3M-luc-C6) or under the control of hVEGF promoter (hVEGF-luc/PC3M) were implanted into male nude mice via an intradermal or subcutaneous injection. Tumor-bearing mice were subsequently imaged every week for nine weeks starting at week 2, by UBM to measure tumor burden using 3D volumetric analysis, or to estimate blood flow using speckle-variance flow processing. Surface bioluminescence was also acquired 10 minutes post i.p. injection of D-luciferin. In a longitudinal drug intervention study anti-hVEGF antibody (Bevacizumab, 200 ug) was injected i.p. into nude mice with subcutaneous xenografts of PC-3M-luc-C6 or hVEGF-luc/PC-3M twice per week for three weeks, starting at 14 days post-xenograft. UBM and surface BLI imaging were conducted every week. In order to study the correlation between VEGF expression in hVEGF-luc/PC3M xenografts (estimated by BLI) to tumor hypoxia level, mice were injected with pimonidazole hydrochloride (60 mg/kg i.v.) after three weeks of treatment and tumors were harvested for immunostaining analysis. Results: Surface BLI outputs (photons/s) from subcutaneous PC-3M-luc-C6 xenografts were highly correlated to tumor volumes measured using 3D UBM for small tumors (<100 mm3, r=0.92, n=8), yet poorly correlated to tumors of large size (>100 mm3, r=0.079, n=8). BLI signals in subcutaneous hVEGF-luc/PC3M xenografts showed an inverse trend to tumor blood flow. PC-3M-luc-C6 tumors treated with Bevacizumab showed growth inhibition by day 28 as demonstrated by 3D UBM (control vs treated = 67.27 vs 48.54 mm3). Moreover, control xenografts showed increased average BLI output over time, whereas treated tumors showed variation in BLI output. Necrosis, hypoxia and blood flow estimates were also investigated. Conclusions: Surface bioluminescence imaging demonstrated high correlations to accurate 3D UBM volumetric measurements of small tumor volumes, suggesting its usefulness in tracking early tumor growth quantitatively in drug intervention studies. A complementary imaging modality, like ultrasound biomicroscopy, is recommended to monitor tumor burden in advanced stages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.aacrmeetingabstracts.org/cgi/content/abstract/2006/1/646-a
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8977
      1. Author :
        Cheng, H. H.; Kuo, C. C.; Yan, J. L.; Chen, H. L.; Lin, W. C.; Wang, K. H.; Tsai, K. K.; Guven, H.; Flaberg, E.; Szekely, L.; Klein, G.; Wu, K. K.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        109
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Acetylserotonin O-Methyltransferase/metabolism; Animals; Biocatalysis/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement/drug effects; Cell Proliferation/drug effects; Cell Transformation, Neoplastic/drug effects/*pathology; Cyclooxygenase 2/*metabolism; Cyclooxygenase 2 Inhibitors/pharmacology; Fibroblasts/drug effects/metabolism; Humans; Metabolic Networks and Pathways/drug effects; Metabolomics; Mice; Neoplasm Metastasis; Solubility/drug effects; Subcellular Fractions/drug effects/metabolism; Tryptophan/*analogs & derivatives/biosynthesis/metabolism/pharmacology; Tryptophan Hydroxylase/metabolism; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression is induced by mitogenic and proinflammatory factors. Its overexpression plays a causal role in inflammation and tumorigenesis. COX-2 expression is tightly regulated, but the mechanisms are largely unclear. Here we show the control of COX-2 expression by an endogenous tryptophan metabolite, 5-methoxytryptophan (5-MTP). By using comparative metabolomic analysis and enzyme-immunoassay, our results reveal that normal fibroblasts produce and release 5-MTP into the extracellular milieu whereas A549 and other cancer cells were defective in 5-MTP production. 5-MTP was synthesized from L-tryptophan via tryptophan hydroxylase-1 and hydroxyindole O-methyltransferase. 5-MTP blocked cancer cell COX-2 overexpression and suppressed A549 migration and invasion. Furthermore, i.p. infusion of 5-MTP reduced tumor growth and cancer metastasis in a murine xenograft tumor model. We conclude that 5-MTP synthesis represents a mechanism for endogenous control of COX-2 overexpression and is a valuable lead for new anti-cancer and anti-inflammatory drug development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22851770
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10521
      1. Author :
        Chen, Y.; Jacamo, R.; Shi, Y. X.; Wang, R. Y.; Battula, V. L.; Konoplev, S.; Strunk, D.; Hofmann, N. A.; Reinisch, A.; Konopleva, M.; Andreeff, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS, Animals; Bone Marrow Cells/*cytology/metabolism/physiology; Bone Marrow Transplantation/*methods/physiology; Cells, Cultured; Cellular Microenvironment/genetics/*physiology; Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics/metabolism; Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/genetics; Mice; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, SCID; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Animal; Osteogenesis/genetics/physiology; Species Specificity; *Transplantation, Heterotopic
      12. Abstract :
        The interactions between hematopoietic cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment play a critical role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and drug resistance. These interactions within the BM niche are unique and could be important for developing new therapies. Here, we describe the development of extramedullary bone and bone marrow using human mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial colony-forming cells implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. We demonstrate the engraftment of human normal and leukemic cells engraft into the human extramedullary bone marrow. When normal hematopoietic cells are engrafted into the model, only discrete areas of the BM are hypoxic, whereas leukemia engraftment results in widespread severe hypoxia, just as recently reported by us in human leukemias. Importantly, the hematopoietic cell engraftment could be altered by genetical manipulation of the bone marrow microenvironment: Extramedullary bone marrow in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was knocked down in mesenchymal stromal cells by lentiviral transfer of short hairpin RNA showed significant reduction (50% +/- 6%; P = .0006) in human leukemic cell engraftment. These results highlight the potential of a novel in vivo model of human BM microenvironment that can be genetically modified. The model could be useful for the study of leukemia biology and for the development of novel therapeutic modalities aimed at modifying the hematopoietic microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490334
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10465
      1. Author :
        Chen, J.; Gallo, K. A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        4130-40
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2-tdtomato, IVIS, tdtomato, fluorescent protein, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/enzymology/*metabolism/*pathology; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Movement/*physiology; Chemokine CXCL12/metabolism; Female; Humans; MAP Kinase Kinase Kinases/*metabolism; MAP Kinase Signaling System; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Paxillin/*metabolism; Phosphorylation
      12. Abstract :
        MLK3 kinase activates multiple mitogen-activated protein kinases and plays a critical role in cancer cell migration and invasion. In the tumor microenvironment, prometastatic factors drive breast cancer invasion and metastasis, but their associated signaling pathways are not well-known. Here, we provide evidence that MLK3 is required for chemokine (CXCL12)-induced invasion of basal breast cancer cells. We found that MLK3 induced robust phosphorylation of the focal adhesion scaffold paxillin on Ser 178 and Tyr 118, which was blocked by silencing or inhibition of MLK3-JNK. Silencing or inhibition of MLK3, inhibition of JNK, or expression of paxillin S178A all led to enhanced Rho activity, indicating that the MLK3-JNK-paxillin axis limits Rho activity to promote focal adhesion turnover and migration. Consistent with this, MLK3 silencing increased focal adhesions and stress fibers in breast cancer cells. MLK3 silencing also decreased the formation of breast cancer lung metastases in vivo, and breast cancer cells derived from mouse lung metastases showed enhanced Ser 178 paxillin phosphorylation. Taken together, our findings suggest that the MLK3-JNK-paxillin signaling axis may represent a potential therapeutic target and/or prognostic marker in breast cancer metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22700880
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10495
      1. Author :
        Chauhan, A.; Lebeaux, D.; Ghigo, J. M.; Beloin, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrob Agents Chemother
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen31, Xen 31, MRSA, S. aureus, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Biofilms that develop on indwelling devices are a major concern in clinical settings. While removal of colonized devices remains the most frequent strategy for avoiding device-related complications, antibiotic lock therapy constitutes an adjunct therapy for catheter-related infection. However, currently used antibiotic lock solutions are not fully effective against biofilms, thus warranting a search for new antibiotic locks. Metal-binding chelators have emerged as potential adjuvants due to their dual anticoagulant/antibiofilm activities, but studies investigating their efficiency were mainly in vitro or else focused on their effects in prevention of infection. To assess the ability of such chelators to eradicate mature biofilms, we used an in vivo model of a totally implantable venous access port inserted in rats and colonized by either Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Escherichia coli, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We demonstrate that use of tetrasodium EDTA (30 mg/ml) as a supplement to the gentamicin (5 mg/ml) antibiotic lock solution associated with systemic antibiotics completely eradicated Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacterial biofilms developed in totally implantable venous access ports. Gentamicin-EDTA lock was able to eliminate biofilms with a single instillation, thus reducing length of treatment. Moreover, we show that this combination was effective for immunosuppressed rats. Lastly, we demonstrate that a gentamicin-EDTA lock is able to eradicate the biofilm formed by a gentamicin-resistant strain of methicillin-resistant S. aureus. This in vivo study demonstrates the potential of EDTA as an efficient antibiotic adjuvant to eradicate catheter-associated biofilms of major bacterial pathogens and thus provides a promising new lock solution.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23027191
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10552
      1. Author :
        Chantry, A. D.; Heath, D.; Mulivor, A. W.; Pearsall, S.; Baud'huin, M.; Coulton, L.; Evans, H.; Abdul, N.; Werner, E. D.; Bouxsein, M. L.; Key, M. L.; Seehra, J.; Arnett, T. R.; Vanderkerken, K.; Croucher, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Bone Miner Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Activins/*metabolism; Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*complications/pathology/physiopathology/secondary; Bone Resorption/*etiology/pathology/physiopathology/*prevention & control; Calcification, Physiologic/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Mice; Multiple Myeloma/complications/pathology/physiopathology; Neoplasm Transplantation; Organ Size/drug effects; Osteoblasts/drug effects/pathology; *Osteogenesis/drug effects; Osteolysis/blood/complications/physiopathology/prevention & control; Paraproteins/metabolism; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacology; *Signal Transduction/drug effects; Survival Analysis; Tumor Burden/drug effects
      12. Abstract :
        Cancers that grow in bone, such as myeloma and breast cancer metastases, cause devastating osteolytic bone destruction. These cancers hijack bone remodeling by stimulating osteoclastic bone resorption and suppressing bone formation. Currently, treatment is targeted primarily at blocking bone resorption, but this approach has achieved only limited success. Stimulating osteoblastic bone formation to promote repair is a novel alternative approach. We show that a soluble activin receptor type IIA fusion protein (ActRIIA.muFc) stimulates osteoblastogenesis (p < .01), promotes bone formation (p < .01) and increases bone mass in vivo (p < .001). We show that the development of osteolytic bone lesions in mice bearing murine myeloma cells is caused by both increased resorption (p < .05) and suppression of bone formation (p < .01). ActRIIA.muFc treatment stimulates osteoblastogenesis (p < .01), prevents myeloma-induced suppression of bone formation (p < .05), blocks the development of osteolytic bone lesions (p < .05), and increases survival (p < .05). We also show, in a murine model of breast cancer bone metastasis, that ActRIIA.muFc again prevents bone destruction (p < .001) and inhibits bone metastases (p < .05). These findings show that stimulating osteoblastic bone formation with ActRIIA.muFc blocks the formation of osteolytic bone lesions and bone metastases in models of myeloma and breast cancer and paves the way for new approaches to treating this debilitating aspect of cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20533325
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10413
      1. Author :
        Cernak, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Front Neurol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight
      12. Abstract :
        Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as (1) direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and (2) via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body's fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21206523
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10420
      1. Author :
        Cerchia, L.; Esposito, C. L.; Camorani, S.; Rienzo, A.; Stasio, L.; Insabato, L.; Affuso, A.; de Franciscis, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Axl is a tyrosine kinase receptor that was first identified as a transforming gene in human myeloid leukemia. Recent converging evidence suggests its implication in cancer progression and invasion for several solid tumors, including lung, breast, brain, thyroid, and pancreas. In the last decade, Axl has thus become an attractive target for therapeutic development of more aggressive cancers. An emerging class of therapeutic inhibitors is now represented by short nucleic acid aptamers. These molecules act as high affinity ligands with several advantages over conventional antibodies for their use in vivo, including their small size and negligible immunogenicity. Furthermore, these molecules can easily form conjugates able to drive the specific delivery of interfering RNAs, nanoparticles, or chemotherapeutics. We have thus generated and characterized a selective RNA-based aptamer, GL21.T that binds the extracellular domain of Axl at high affinity (12 nmol/l) and inhibits its catalytic activity. GL21.T blocked Axl-dependent transducing events in vitro, including Erk and Akt phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, as well as in vivo lung tumor formation in mice xenografts. In this respect, the GL21.T aptamer represents a promising therapeutic molecule for Axl-dependent cancers whose importance is highlighted by the paucity of available Axl-specific inhibitory molecules.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22910292
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10520
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