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      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Purchio, T.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Diagnostic Imaging/ methods, Female, Mice, Microscopy, Electron, Scanning, Photons, Proteus Infections/ diagnosis, Proteus mirabilis/drug effects/isolation & purification, Pseudomonas Infections/ diagnosis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa/drug effects/isolation & purification, Urinary Catheterization/ adverse effects, Urinary Tract Infections/ diagnosis IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        Urinary tract infections (UTIs) are among the most common bacterial infections acquired by humans, particularly in catheterized patients. A major problem with catheterization is the formation of bacterial biofilms on catheter material and the risk of developing persistent UTIs that are difficult to monitor and eradicate. To better understand the course of UTIs and allow more accurate studies of in vivo antibiotic efficacy, we developed a catheter-based biofilm infection model with mice, using bioluminescently engineered bacteria. Two important urinary tract pathogens, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis, were made bioluminescent by stable insertion of a complete lux operon. Segments of catheter material (precolonized or postimplant infected) with either pathogen were placed transurethrally in the lumen of the bladder by using a metal stylet without surgical manipulation. The bioluminescent strains were sufficiently bright to be readily monitored from the outside of infected animals, using a low-light optical imaging system, including the ability to trace the ascending pattern of light-emitting bacteria through ureters to the kidneys. Placement of the catheter in the bladder not only resulted in the development of strong cystitis that persisted significantly longer than in mice challenged with bacterial suspensions alone but also required prolonged antibiotic treatment to reduce the level of infection. Treatment of infected mice for 4 days with ciprofloxacin at 30 mg/kg of body weight twice a day cured cystitis and renal infection in noncatheterized mice. Similarly, ciprofloxacin reduced the bacterial burden to undetectable levels in catheterized mice but did not inhibit rebound of the infection upon cessation of antibiotic therapy. This methodology easily allows spatial information to be monitored sequentially throughout the entire disease process, including ascending UTI, treatment efficacy, and relapse, all without exogenous sampling, which is not possible with conventional methods.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15972473
      14. Call Number :
        139333
      15. Serial :
        7110
      1. Author :
        Jan Grimm; David G. Kirsch; Stephen D. Windsor; Carla F. Bender Kim; Philip M. Santiago; Vasilis Ntziachristos; Tyler Jacks; Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        PNAS
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        102
      8. Issue :
        40
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        gene expression profiling; lung cancer; immunohistochemistry; Western blotting; in vivo imaging; moleuclar imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography
      12. Abstract :
        Using gene expression profiling, we identified cathepsin cysteine proteases as highly up-regulated genes in a mouse model of human lung adenocarcinoma. Overexpression of cathepsin proteases in these lung tumors was confirmed by immunohistochemistry and Western blotting. Therefore, an optical probe activated by cathepsin proteases was selected to detect murine lung tumors in vivo as small as 1 mm in diameter and spatially separated. We generated 3D maps of the fluorescence signal and fused them with anatomical computed tomography images to show a close correlation between fluorescence signal and tumor burden. By serially imaging the same mouse, optical imaging was used to follow tumor progression. This study demonstrates the capability for molecular imaging of a primary lung tumor by using endogenous proteases expressed by a tumor. It also highlights the feasibility of using gene expression profiling to identify molecular targets for imaging lung cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1242291/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4524
      1. Author :
        Ryan, P. L.; Christiansen, D. L.; Hopper, R. M.; Walters, F. K.; Moulton, K.; Curbelo, J.; Greene, J. M.; Willard, S. T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Anim Sci
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        89
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Horse, bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Uterine and placental infections are the leading cause of abortion, stillbirth, and preterm delivery in the mare. Whereas uterine and placental infections in women have been studied extensively, a comprehensive examination of the pathogenic processes leading to this unsatisfactory pregnancy outcome in the mare has yet to be completed. Most information in the literature relating to late-term pregnancy loss in mares is based on retrospective studies of clinical cases submitted for necropsy. Here we report the development and application of a novel approach, whereby transgenically modified bacteria transformed with lux genes of Xenorhabdus luminescens or Photorhabdus luminescens origin and biophotonic imaging are utilized to better understand pathogen-induced preterm birth in late-term pregnant mares. This technology uses highly sensitive bioluminescence imaging camera systems to localize and monitor pathogen progression during tissue invasion by measuring the bioluminescent signatures emitted by the lux-modified pathogens. This method has an important advantage in that it allows for the potential tracking of pathogens in vivo in real time and over time, which was hitherto impossible. Although the application of this technology in domestic animals is in its infancy, investigators were successful in identifying the fetal lungs, sinuses, nares, urinary, and gastrointestinal systems as primary tissues for pathogen invasion after experimental infection of pregnant mares with lux-modified Escherichia coli. It is important that pathogens were not detected in other vital organs, such as the liver, brain, and cardiac system. Such precision in localizing sites of pathogen invasion provides potential application for this novel approach in the development of more targeted therapeutic interventions for pathogen-related diseases in the equine and other domestic species.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21239661
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10395
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        179
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Bacterial Adhesion; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Coxsackievirus Infections; Immunity, Mucosal; Immunoglobulin A; Lymphocyte Count; Lymphocytes; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Peyer's Patches; Receptors, Lymphocyte Homing; Staphylococcal Vaccines; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        VAP-1, an ecto-enzyme expressed on the surface of endothelial cells, is involved in leukocyte trafficking between the blood and tissues under physiological and pathological conditions. In this study, we used VAP-1-deficient mice to elucidate whether absence of VAP-1 alters the immune system under normal conditions and upon immunization and microbial challenge. We found that VAP-1-deficient mice display age-dependent paucity of lymphocytes, in the Peyer's patches of the gut. IgA concentration in serum was also found to be lower in VAP-1(-/-) animals than in wild-type mice. Although there were slightly less CD11a on B and T cells isolated from VAP-1-deficient mice than on those from wild-type mice, there were no differences in the expression of gut-homing-associated adhesion molecules or chemokine receptors. Because anti-VAP-1 therapies are being developed for clinical use to treat inflammation, we determined the effect of VAP-1 deletion on useful immune responses. Oral immunization with OVA showed defective T and B cell responses in VAP-1-deficient mice. Antimicrobial immune responses against Staphylococcus aureus and coxsackie B4 virus were also affected by the absence of VAP-1. Importantly, when the function of VAP-1 was acutely neutralized using small molecule enzyme inhibitors and anti-VAP-1 Abs rather than by gene deletion, no significant impairment in antimicrobial control was detected. In conclusion, VAP-1-deficient mice have mild deviations in the mucosal immune system and therapeutic targeting of VAP-1 does not appear to cause a generalized increase in the risk of infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17947691
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9984
      1. Author :
        Marttila-Ichihara, Fumiko; Castermans, Karolien; Auvinen, Kaisa; Oude Egbrink, Mirjam G A; Jalkanen, Sirpa; Griffioen, Arjan W; Salmi, Marko
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Adjuvants, Immunologic; Allylamine; Amine Oxidase (Copper-Containing); Animals; Antibodies, Blocking; Antibodies, Monoclonal; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Migration Inhibition; Enzyme Inhibitors; Female; Growth Inhibitors; Lymphoma, T-Cell; Melanoma, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Myeloid Cells; Semicarbazides
      12. Abstract :
        Vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1) is an endothelial, cell surface-expressed oxidase involved in leukocyte traffic. The adhesive function of VAP-1 can be blocked by anti-VAP-1 Abs and small-molecule inhibitors. However, the effects of VAP-1 blockade on antitumor immunity and tumor progression are unknown. In this paper, we used anti-VAP-1 mAbs and small-molecule inhibitors of VAP-1 in B16 melanoma and EL-4 lymphoma tumor models in C57BL/6 mice. Leukocyte accumulation into tumors and neoangiogenesis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, flow cytometry, and intravital videomicroscopy. We found that both anti-VAP-1 Abs and VAP-1 inhibitors reduced the number of leukocytes in the tumors, but they targeted partially different leukocyte subpopulations. Anti-VAP-1 Abs selectively inhibited infiltration of CD8-positive lymphocytes into tumors and had no effect on accumulation of myeloid cells into tumors. In contrast, the VAP-1 inhibitors significantly reduced only the number of proangiogenic Gr-1(+)CD11b(+) myeloid cells in melanomas and lymphomas. Blocking of VAP-1 by either means left tumor homing of regulatory T cells and type 2 immune-suppressing monocytes/macrophages intact. Notably, VAP-1 inhibitors, but not anti-VAP-1 Abs, retarded the growth of melanomas and lymphomas and reduced tumor neoangiogenesis. The VAP-1 inhibitors also reduced the binding of Gr-1(+) myeloid cells to the tumor vasculature. We conclude that tumors use the catalytic activity of VAP-1 to recruit myeloid cells into tumors and to support tumor progression. Small-molecule VAP-1 inhibitors therefore might be a potential new tool for immunotherapy of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20154208
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8996
      1. Author :
        Orihuela, Carlos J; Gao, Geli; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Tuomanen, Elaine I
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of infectious diseases
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        190
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        1661-1669
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bacteremia; Bacterial Proteins; Cerebrospinal Fluid; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Lung; Meningitis, Pneumococcal; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mutation; N-Acetylmuramoyl-L-alanine Amidase; Nasopharynx; Neuraminidase; Pneumococcal Infections; Pneumonia, Pneumococcal; Pyruvate Oxidase; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Streptolysins; Virulence Factors; Xen7
      12. Abstract :
        We assessed the ability of Streptococcus pneumoniae mutants deficient in either choline binding protein A (CbpA), pneumolysin (Pln), pyruvate oxidase (SpxB), autolysin (LytA), pneumococcal surface protein A, or neuraminidase A (NanA) to replicate in distinct anatomical sites and translocate from one site to the next. Intranasal, intratracheal, and intravenous models of disease were assessed in 4-week-old BALB/cJ mice by quantitation of bacterial titers in the relevant organs. Mice were also observed by use of real-time bioluminescent imaging (BLI). BLI allowed visualization of the bacteria in sites not tested by sampling. All mutants were created in D39 Xen7, a fully virulent derivative of capsular type 2 strain D39 that contains an optimized luxABCDE cassette. NanA, SpxB, and, to a lesser extent, CbpA contributed to prolonged nasopharyngeal colonization, whereas CbpA and NanA contributed to the transition to the lower respiratory tract. Once lung infection was established, Pln, SpxB, and LytA contributed to bacterial replication in the lungs and translocation to the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, only Pln and LytA were required for high-titer replication, whereas CbpA was required for invasion of the cerebrospinal fluid. We conclude that transitions between body sites require virulence determinants distinct from those involved in organ-specific replication.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/15478073
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10002
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Modi, K.; Coquoz, O.; Rice, B.; Smith, S.; Contag, P. R.; Purchio, T.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and Immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        We developed a method for simultaneous in vivo biophotonic monitoring of pneumococcal meningitis and the accompanying neuronal injury in live transgenic mice. Streptococcus pneumoniae engineered for bioluminescence (lux) was used for direct visualization of disease progression and antibiotic treatment in a mouse model of meningitis. The host response was monitored in transgenic mice containing an inducible firefly luciferase (luc) reporter gene under transcriptional control of the mouse glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) promoter. Based on the different spectra of light emission and substrate requirements for lux and luc, we were able to separately monitor the two reporters using a highly sensitive in vivo imaging system. The level of neuronal damage and recovery following antibiotic treatment was dependent on the time of treatment. This model has potential for simultaneous multiparameter monitoring and testing of therapies that target the pathogen or host response to prevent neuronal injury and recovery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16299273
      14. Call Number :
        139327
      15. Serial :
        7497
      1. Author :
        Sadikot, Ruxana T; Zeng, Heng; Yull, Fiona E; Li, Bo; Cheng, Dong-sheng; Kernodle, Douglas S; Jansen, E Duco; Contag, Christopher H; Segal, Brahm H; Holland, Steven M; Blackwell, Timothy S; Christman, John W
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2004
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        172
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Cells, Cultured; Dose-Response Relationship, Immunologic; Immunity, Innate; Lung; Macrophages; Membrane Glycoproteins; Mice; Mice, Inbred C3H; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Inbred DBA; Mice, Transgenic; NADPH Oxidase; Neutrophil Infiltration; NF-kappa B; Phosphoproteins; Pneumonia, Bacterial; Pseudomonas Infections; Receptors, Cell Surface; Signal Transduction; Toll-Like Receptors; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        We examined the role of redox signaling generated by NADPH oxidase in activation of NF-kappaB and host defense against Pseudomonas aeruginosa pneumonia. Using mice with an NF-kappaB-driven luciferase reporter construct (HIV-LTR/luciferase (HLL)), we found that intratracheal administration of P. aeruginosa resulted in a dose-dependent neutrophilic influx and activation of NF-kappaB. To determine the effects of reactive oxygen species generated by the NADPH oxidase system on activation of NF-kappaB, we crossbred mice deficient in p47(phox) with NF-kappaB reporter mice (p47(phox-/-)HLL). These p47(phox-/-)HLL mice were unable to activate NF-kappaB to the same degree as HLL mice with intact NADPH oxidase following P. aeruginosa infection. In addition, lung TNF-alpha levels were significantly lower in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice compared with HLL mice. Bacterial clearance was impaired in p47(phox-/-)HLL mice. In vitro studies using bone marrow-derived macrophages showed that Toll-like receptor 4 was necessary for NF-kappaB activation following treatment with P. aeruginosa. Additional studies with macrophages from p47(phox-/-) mice confirmed that redox signaling was necessary for maximal Toll-like receptor 4-dependent NF-kappaB activation in this model. These data indicate that the NADPH oxidase-dependent respiratory burst stimulated by Pseudomonas infection contributes to host defense by modulating redox-dependent signaling through the NF-kappaB pathway.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14734763
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9999
      1. Author :
        Kadurugamuwa, J. L.; Sin, L. V.; Yu, J.; Francis, K. P.; Kimura, R.; Purchio, T.; Contag, P. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        47
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Anti-Bacterial Agents/ pharmacology, Bacterial Infections/drug therapy/microbiology, Biofilms/ drug effects/growth & development, Bioware; Catheterization/adverse effects, Chemiluminescent Measurements, Ciprofloxacin/pharmacology, Colony Count, Microbial, Disease Models, Animal, Dose-Response Relationship, Drug, Drug Monitoring/methods, Mice, Rifampin/pharmacology, Staphylococcus aureus/drug effects/genetics/growth & development, Tobramycin/pharmacology IVIS, Xenogen; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        We have developed a rapid, continuous method for monitoring the effectiveness of several antibacterial agents in real time, noninvasively, by using a recently described mouse model of chronic biofilm infection (J. L. Kadurugamuwa et al., Infect. Immun. 71:882-890, 2003), which relies on biophotonic imaging of bioluminescent bacteria. To facilitate real-time monitoring of infection, we used a Staphylococcus aureus isolate that was made bioluminescent by inserting a modified lux operon into the bacterial chromosome. This bioluminescent reporter bacterium was used to study the antimicrobial effects of several antibiotics belonging to different molecular families. Treatment with rifampin, tobramycin, and ciprofloxacin was started 7 days after subcutaneous implantation of catheters precolonized with 10(4) CFU of S. aureus. Three different doses of antibiotics were administered twice a day for 4 consecutive days. The number of metabolically active bacteria in untreated mice and the tobramycin- and ciprofloxacin-treated groups remained relatively unchanged over the 4-week observation period, indicating poor efficacies for tobramycin and ciprofloxacin. A rapid dose-dependent decline in metabolic activity in rifampin-treated groups was observed, with almost a 90% reduction after two doses and nearly undetectable levels after three doses. The disappearance of light emission correlated with colony counts. After the final treatment, cell numbers rebounded as a function of concentration in a time-dependent manner. The staphylococci isolated from the catheters of mice treated with rifampin were uniformly resistant to rifampin but retained their in vitro susceptibilities to tobramycin and ciprofloxacin. Since the metabolic activities of viable cells and a postantibiotic effect could be detected directly on the support matrix nondestructively and noninvasively, the methodology is specifically appealing for investigating the effects of antibiotics on biofilms in vivo. Moreover, our study points to the possible use of biophotonic imaging for the detection of the development of resistance to therapeutic agents during treatment of chronic infections in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14506020
      14. Call Number :
        139345
      15. Serial :
        7448
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