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      1. Author :
        Mieog, J. S.; Hutteman, M.; van der Vorst, J. R.; Kuppen, P. J.; Que, I.; Dijkstra, J.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Prins, F.; Lowik, C. W.; Smit, V. T.; van de Velde, C. J.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Breast Cancer Res Treat
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        128
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense, IVIS, Animals; Breast Neoplasms/pathology/*surgery; Cell Line, Tumor; Disease Models, Animal; Female; *Microscopy, Fluorescence; Rats; *Surgery, Computer-Assisted; Transplantation, Isogeneic; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor involvement of resection margins is found in a large proportion of patients who undergo breast-conserving surgery. Near-infrared (NIR) fluorescence imaging is an experimental technique to visualize cancer cells during surgery. To determine the accuracy of real-time NIR fluorescence imaging in obtaining tumor-free resection margins, a protease-activatable NIR fluorescence probe and an intraoperative camera system were used in the EMR86 orthotopic syngeneic breast cancer rat model. Influence of concentration, timing and number of tumor cells were tested in the MCR86 rat breast cancer cell line. These variables were significantly associated with NIR fluorescence probe activation. Dosing and tumor size were also significantly associated with fluorescence intensity in the EMR86 rat model, whereas time of imaging was not. Real-time NIR fluorescence guidance of tumor resection resulted in a complete resection of 17 out of 17 tumors with minimal excision of normal healthy tissue (mean minimum and a mean maximum tumor-free margin of 0.2 +/- 0.2 mm and 1.3 +/- 0.6 mm, respectively). Moreover, the technique enabled identification of remnant tumor tissue in the surgical cavity. Histological analysis revealed that the NIR fluorescence signal was highest at the invasive tumor border and in the stromal compartment of the tumor. In conclusion, NIR fluorescence detection of breast tumor margins was successful in a rat model. This study suggests that clinical introduction of intraoperative NIR fluorescence imaging has the potential to increase the number of complete tumor resections in breast cancer patients undergoing breast-conserving surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20821347
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10429
      1. Author :
        Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Grandjean, M.; Dieu, M.; Raes, M.; Hatzopoulos, A. K.; Kupatt, C.; Feron, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc,
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor progression is associated with the release of signaling substances from the primary tumor into the bloodstream. Tumor-derived cytokines are known to promote the mobilization and the recruitment of cells from the bone marrow, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Here, we examined whether such paracrine influence could also influence the capacity of EPC to interfere with circulating metastatic cells. We therefore consecutively injected EPC pre-stimulated by tumor conditioned medium (CM-EPC) and luciferase-expressing B16 melanoma cells to mice. A net decrease in metastases spreading (vs non-stimulated EPC) led us to carry out a 2D-DIGE proteomic study to identify possible mediators of EPC-driven protection. Among 33 proteins exhibiting significant changes in expression, SPARC presented the highest induction after EPC exposure to CM. We then showed that contrary to control EPC, SPARC-silenced EPC were not able to reduce the extent of metastases when injected with B16 melanoma cells. Using adhesion tests and the hanging drop assay, we further documented that cell-cell interactions between CM-EPC and melanoma cells were promoted in a SPARC-dependent manner. This interaction led to the engulfment of melanoma cells by CM-EPC, a process prevented by SPARC silencing and mimicked by recombinant SPARC. Finally, we showed that contrary to melanoma cells, the pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231-D3H2 reduced SPARC expression in human EPC and stimulated metastases spreading. Our findings unravel the influence of tumor cells on EPC phenotypes through a SPARC-driven accentuation of macrophagic capacity associated with limitations to metastatic spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21616936
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10354
      1. Author :
        Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Grandjean, M.; Dieu, M.; Raes, M.; Hatzopoulos, A. K.; Kupatt, C.; Feron, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor progression is associated with the release of signaling substances from the primary tumor into the bloodstream. Tumor-derived cytokines are known to promote the mobilization and the recruitment of cells from the bone marrow, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Here, we examined whether such paracrine influence could also influence the capacity of EPC to interfere with circulating metastatic cells. We therefore consecutively injected EPC pre-stimulated by tumor conditioned medium (CM-EPC) and luciferase-expressing B16 melanoma cells to mice. A net decrease in metastases spreading (vs non-stimulated EPC) led us to carry out a 2D-DIGE proteomic study to identify possible mediators of EPC-driven protection. Among 33 proteins exhibiting significant changes in expression, SPARC presented the highest induction after EPC exposure to CM. We then showed that contrary to control EPC, SPARC-silenced EPC were not able to reduce the extent of metastases when injected with B16 melanoma cells. Using adhesion tests and the hanging drop assay, we further documented that cell-cell interactions between CM-EPC and melanoma cells were promoted in a SPARC-dependent manner. This interaction led to the engulfment of melanoma cells by CM-EPC, a process prevented by SPARC silencing and mimicked by recombinant SPARC. Finally, we showed that contrary to melanoma cells, the pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231-D3H2 reduced SPARC expression in human EPC and stimulated metastases spreading. Our findings unravel the influence of tumor cells on EPC phenotypes through a SPARC-driven accentuation of macrophagic capacity associated with limitations to metastatic spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21616936
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10415
      1. Author :
        Cortez-Retamozo, V.; Etzrodt, M.; Newton, A.; Rauch, P. J.; Chudnovskiy, A.; Berger, C.; Ryan, R. J.; Iwamoto, Y.; Marinelli, B.; Gorbatov, R.; Forghani, R.; Novobrantseva, T. I.; Koteliansky, V.; Figueiredo, J. L.; Chen, J. W.; Anderson, D. G.; Nahrendorf, M.; Swirski, F. K.; Weissleder, R.; Pittet, M. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        109
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Humans; Macrophages/*immunology; Mice; Neoplasms/immunology/*pathology; Neutrophils/*immunology; Spleen/immunology/pathology
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-associated macrophages (TAMs) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) can control cancer growth and exist in almost all solid neoplasms. The cells are known to descend from immature monocytic and granulocytic cells, respectively, which are produced in the bone marrow. However, the spleen is also a recently identified reservoir of monocytes, which can play a significant role in the inflammatory response that follows acute injury. Here, we evaluated the role of the splenic reservoir in a genetic mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma driven by activation of oncogenic Kras and inactivation of p53. We found that high numbers of TAM and TAN precursors physically relocated from the spleen to the tumor stroma, and that recruitment of tumor-promoting spleen-derived TAMs required signaling of the chemokine receptor CCR2. Also, removal of the spleen, either before or after tumor initiation, reduced TAM and TAN responses significantly and delayed tumor growth. The mechanism by which the spleen was able to maintain its reservoir capacity throughout tumor progression involved, in part, local accumulation in the splenic red pulp of typically rare extramedullary hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells, notably granulocyte and macrophage progenitors, which produced CD11b(+) Ly-6C(hi) monocytic and CD11b(+) Ly-6G(hi) granulocytic cells locally. Splenic granulocyte and macrophage progenitors and their descendants were likewise identified in clinical specimens. The present study sheds light on the origins of TAMs and TANs, and positions the spleen as an important extramedullary site, which can continuously supply growing tumors with these cells.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22308361
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 14
      15. Serial :
        10432
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, Blotting, Western, Xen26, Cell Line, Tumor, Diagnostic Imaging/methods, Gene Therapy/*methods, Genetic Engineering/*methods, Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use, Humans, Male, Mice, Mice, Inbred BALB C, Neoplasms/*therapy, Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use, Promoter Regions, Genetic, Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics, bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics IVIS, Xenogen
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20028866
      14. Call Number :
        141643
      15. Serial :
        6246
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, V. H.; Kim, H. S.; Ha, J. M.; Hong, Y.; Choy, H. E.; Min, J. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        70
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Blotting, Western; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging/methods; Gene Therapy/*methods; Genetic Engineering/*methods; Genetic Vectors/*therapeutic use; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Neoplasms/*therapy; Perforin/*genetics/therapeutic use; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Salmonella typhimurium/*genetics; bcl-Associated Death Protein/genetics
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor-targeting bacteria have been studied in terms of their ability to visualize the infection pathway (through imaging probes) or to carry therapeutic molecules to tumors. To integrate these monitoring and therapeutic functions, we engineered attenuated Salmonella typhimurium defective in guanosine 5'-diphosphate-3'-diphosphate synthesis to carry cytotoxic proteins (cytolysin A) and express reporter genes. We successfully visualized the therapeutic process with these engineered bacteria in mice and found that they often mediated complete tumor (CT-26) eradication on cytotoxic gene induction. Furthermore, treatment with the engineered bacteria markedly suppressed metastatic tumor growth.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20028866
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10560
      1. Author :
        Baddour, Ralph E; Dadani, Farhan N; Kolios, Michael C; Bisland, Stuart K
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of biological physics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        33
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Ultrasound imaging is proving to be an important tool for medical diagnosis of dermatological disease. Backscatter spectral profiles using high-frequency ultrasound (HFUS, 10-100 MHz) are sensitive to subtle changes in eukaryotic cellular morphology and mechanical properties that are indicative of early apoptosis, the main type of cell death induced following photodynamic therapy (PDT). We performed experiments to study whether HFUS could also be used to discern changes in bacteria following PDT treatment. Pellets of planktonic Staphylococcus aureus were treated with different PDT protocols and subsequently interrogated with HFUS. Changes in ultrasound backscatter response were found to correlate with antimicrobial effect. Despite their small size, distinct changes in bacterial morphology that are indicative of cell damage or death are detectable by altered backscatter spectra from bacterial ensembles using HFUS. This highlights the potential for HFUS in rapidly and non-invasively assessing the structural changes related to antimicrobial response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19669553
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9052
      1. Author :
        Chung, HM; Cartwright, MM; Bortz, DM; Jackson, TL; Younger, JG
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Shock
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        30
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen39
      12. Abstract :
        Unlike many localized infections, the development and resolution of bacteremia involves physical and immunological interactions between many anatomic sites. In an effort to better understand these interactions, we developed a computational model of bacteremia as a dynamical system fashioned after multicompartmental pharmacodynamic models, incorporating bacterial proliferation and clearance in the blood, liver, spleen, and lungs, and the transport of pathogens between these sites. A system of four first-order homogeneous ODEs was developed. Blood and organ bacterial burdens were measured at various time points from 3 to 48 h postinoculation using an LD25 murine model of Staphylococcus epidermidis bacteremia. Using these empiric data, solutions to the mathematical model were recovered. A bootstrap resampling method was used to generate 95% confidence intervals around the solved parameters. The validity of the model was examined in parallel experiments using animals acutely immunocompromised with cyclophosphamide; the model captured abnormalities in bacterial partitioning previously described with this antineoplastic agent. Lastly, the approach was used to explore possible benefits to clinically observed hyperdynamic blood flow during sepsis: in simulation, normal mice, but not those treated with cyclophosphamide, enjoyed significantly more rapid bacterial clearance from the bloodstream under hyperdynamic conditions.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18317411
      14. Call Number :
        136975
      15. Serial :
        5976
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