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      1. Author :
        Galina Gabriely, Thomas Wurdinger, Santosh Kesari, Christine C. Esau, Julja Burchard, Peter S. Linsley and Anna M. Krichevsky
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Molecular and Cellular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Neuroscience
      11. Keywords :
        in vivo imaging; MMPSense; microRNA 21; glioma
      12. Abstract :
        Substantial data indicate that microRNA 21 (miR-21) is significantly elevated in glioblastoma (GBM) and in many other tumors of various origins. This microRNA has been implicated in various aspects of carcinogenesis, including cellular proliferation, apoptosis, and migration. We demonstrate that miR-21 regulates multiple genes associated with glioma cell apoptosis, migration, and invasiveness, including the RECK and TIMP3 genes, which are suppressors of malignancy and inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Specific inhibition of miR-21 with antisense oligonucleotides leads to elevated levels of RECK and TIMP3 and therefore reduces MMP activities in vitro and in a human model of gliomas in nude mice. Moreover, downregulation of miR-21 in glioma cells leads to decreases of their migratory and invasion abilities. Our data suggest that miR-21 contributes to glioma malignancy by downregulation of MMP inhibitors, which leads to activation of MMPs, thus promoting invasiveness of cancer cells. Our results also indicate that inhibition of a single oncomir, like miR-21, with specific antisense molecules can provide a novel therapeutic approach for “physiological” modulation of multiple proteins whose expression is deregulated in cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://mcb.asm.org/cgi/content/abstract/28/17/5369
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4546
      1. Author :
        Kadioglu, A.; Brewin, H.; Hartel, T.; Brittan, J. L.; Klein, M.; Hammerschmidt, S.; Jenkinson, H. F.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Mol Oral Microbiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen10, Xen 10, Streptococcus pneumoniae Xen10, IVIS, Animals; Bacterial Adhesion; Bacterial Processes; Bacterial Proteins/*physiology; *Carrier State; Colony Count, Microbial; Female; Host-Pathogen Interactions; Lung/microbiology; Meningitis, Pneumococcal/microbiology; Mice; Models, Animal; Mutation; Nasopharynx/*microbiology; Pneumonia, Pneumococcal/complications; Sepsis/*microbiology; Streptococcus pneumoniae/*pathogenicity; Virulence Factors/physiology
      12. Abstract :
        Summary The pneumococcal cell surface protein PavA is a virulence factor associated with adherence and invasion in vitro. In this study we show in vivo that PavA is necessary for Streptococcus pneumoniae D39 colonization of the murine upper respiratory tract in a long-term carriage model, with PavA-deficient pneumococci being quickly cleared from nasopharyngeal tissue. In a pneumonia model, pavA mutants were not cleared from the lungs of infected mice and persisted to cause chronic infection, whereas wild-type pneumococci caused systemic infection. Hence, under the experimental conditions, PavA-deficient pneumococci appeared to be unable to seed from lung tissue into blood, although they survived in blood when administered intravenously. In a meningitis model of infection, levels of PavA-deficient pneumococci in blood and brain following intercisternal injection were significantly lower than wild type. Taken collectively these results suggest that PavA is involved in successful colonization of mucosal surfaces and in translocation of pneumococci across host barriers. Pneumococcal sepsis is a major cause of mortality worldwide so identification of factors such as PavA that are necessary for carriage and for translocation from tissue to blood is of clinical and therapeutic importance.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20331793
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10400
      1. Author :
        Welti, J. C.; Powles, T.; Foo, S.; Gourlaouen, M.; Preece, N.; Foster, J.; Frentzas, S.; Bird, D.; Sharpe, K.; van Weverwijk, A.; Robertson, D.; Soffe, J.; Erler, J. T.; Pili, R.; Springer, C. J.; Mather, S. J.; Reynolds, A. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Angiogenesis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        623-41
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, 4T1, Bioware, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        Sunitinib is a potent and clinically approved tyrosine kinase inhibitor that can suppress tumour growth by inhibiting angiogenesis. However, conflicting data exist regarding the effects of this drug on the growth of metastases in preclinical models. Here we use 4T1 and RENCA tumour cells, which both form lung metastases in Balb/c mice, to re-address the effects of sunitinib on the progression of metastatic disease in mice. We show that treatment of mice with sunitinib prior to intravenous injection of tumour cells can promote the seeding and growth of 4T1 lung metastases, but not RENCA lung metastases, showing that this effect is cell line dependent. However, increased metastasis occurred only upon administration of a very high sunitinib dose, but not when lower, clinically relevant doses were used. Mechanistically, high dose sunitinib led to a pericyte depletion effect in the lung vasculature that correlated with increased seeding of metastasis. By administering sunitinib to mice after intravenous injection of tumour cells, we demonstrate that while sunitinib does not inhibit the growth of 4T1 lung tumour nodules, it does block the growth of RENCA lung tumour nodules. This contrasting response was correlated with increased myeloid cell recruitment and persistent vascularisation in 4T1 tumours, whereas RENCA tumours recruited less myeloid cells and were more profoundly devascularised upon sunitinib treatment. Finally, we show that progression of 4T1 tumours in sunitinib treated mice results in increased hypoxia and increased glucose metabolism in these tumours and that this is associated with a poor outcome. Taken together, these data suggest that the effects of sunitinib on tumour progression are dose-dependent and tumour model-dependent. These findings have relevance for understanding how anti-angiogenic agents may influence disease progression when used in the adjuvant or metastatic setting in cancer patients.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22843200
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10504
      1. Author :
        Yang, Li; Johansson, Jan; Ridsdale, Ross; Willander, Hanna; Fitzen, Michael; Akinbi, Henry T; Weaver, Timothy E
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        184
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bronchoalveolar Lavage Fluid; Hydrogen-Ion Concentration; Immunity, Innate; Klebsiella pneumoniae; Macrophages, Alveolar; Mice; Mice, Transgenic; Protein Precursors; Protein Structure, Tertiary; Proteolipids; Saposins; Staphylococcus aureus; Tissue Distribution; Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Surfactant protein B (SP-B) proprotein contains three saposin-like protein (SAPLIP) domains: a SAPLIP domain corresponding to the mature SP-B peptide is essential for lung function and postnatal survival; the function of SAPLIP domains in the N-terminal (SP-BN) and C-terminal regions of the proprotein is not known. In the current study, SP-BN was detected in the supernatant of mouse bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) and in nonciliated bronchiolar cells, alveolar type II epithelial cells, and alveolar macrophages. rSP-BN indirectly promoted the uptake of bacteria by macrophage cell lines and directly killed bacteria at acidic pH, consistent with a lysosomal, antimicrobial function. Native SP-BN isolated from BALF also killed bacteria but only at acidic pH; the bactericidal activity of BALF at acidic pH was completely blocked by SP-BN Ab. Transgenic mice overexpressing SP-BN and mature SP-B peptide had significantly decreased bacterial burden and increased survival following intranasal inoculation with bacteria. These findings support the hypothesis that SP-BN contributes to innate host defense of the lung by supplementing the nonoxidant antimicrobial defenses of alveolar macrophages.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20007532
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9995
      1. Author :
        Cheung, R.; Shen, F.; Phillips, J. H.; McGeachy, M. J.; Cua, D. J.; Heyworth, P. G.; Pierce, R. H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Clin Invest
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight, Adaptor Proteins, Signal Transducing/metabolism; Animals; Cell Differentiation; Concanavalin A/toxicity; Dengue Hemorrhagic Fever/etiology; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Female; Humans; Immunity, Innate; Intracellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins/metabolism; Lectins, C-Type/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Liver/metabolism/pathology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout; Models, Immunological; Myeloid Cells/*immunology/pathology; Nitric Oxide/biosynthesis; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type II/metabolism; Nitric Oxide Synthase Type III/metabolism; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/metabolism; Protein-Tyrosine Kinases/metabolism; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/metabolism; Receptors, Cell Surface/deficiency/genetics/*immunology; Receptors, Immunologic/metabolism; Shock/*etiology/*immunology/metabolism/pathology; Signal Transduction; Systemic Inflammatory Response; Syndrome/etiology/immunology/metabolism/pathology; Tumor Necrosis Factor-alpha/biosynthesis
      12. Abstract :
        Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) is a potentially lethal condition, as it can progress to shock, multi-organ failure, and death. It can be triggered by infection, tissue damage, or hemorrhage. The role of tissue injury in the progression from SIRS to shock is incompletely understood. Here, we show that treatment of mice with concanavalin A (ConA) to induce liver injury triggered a G-CSF-dependent hepatic infiltration of CD11b+Gr-1+Ly6G+Ly6C+ immature myeloid cells that expressed the orphan receptor myeloid DAP12-associated lectin-1 (MDL-1; also known as CLEC5A). Activation of MDL-1 using dengue virus or an agonist MDL-1-specific antibody in the ConA-treated mice resulted in shock. The MDL-1+ cells were pathogenic, and in vivo depletion of MDL-1+ cells provided protection. Triggering MDL-1 on these cells induced production of NO and TNF-alpha, which were found to be elevated in the serum of treated mice and required for MDL-1-induced shock. Surprisingly, MDL-1-induced NO and TNF-alpha production required eNOS but not iNOS. Activation of DAP12, DAP10, Syk, PI3K, and Akt was critical for MDL-1-induced shock. In addition, Akt physically interacted with and activated eNOS. Therefore, triggering of MDL-1 on immature myeloid cells and production of NO and TNF-alpha may play a critical role in the pathogenesis of shock. Targeting the MDL-1/Syk/PI3K/Akt/eNOS pathway represents a potential new therapeutic strategy to prevent the progression of SIRS to shock.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22005300
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10421
      1. Author :
        Hu, Guohong; Chong, Robert A; Yang, Qifeng; Wei, Yong; Blanco, Mario A; Li, Feng; Reiss, Michael; Au, Jessie L-S; Haffty, Bruce G; Kang, Yibin
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Cancer cell
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        15
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aldehyde Dehydrogenase; Animals; Bioware; Breast Neoplasms; Cell Adhesion Molecules; Cell Line, Tumor; Chromosomes, Human, Pair 8; Drug Resistance, Neoplasm; Gene Expression Profiling; Genome, Human; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Metastasis; Neoplasm Recurrence, Local; Prognosis; Proto-Oncogene Proteins; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-met; Receptors, Growth Factor; Survival Rate; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Targeted therapy for metastatic diseases relies on the identification of functionally important metastasis genes from a large number of random genetic alterations. Here we use a computational algorithm to map minimal recurrent genomic alterations associated with poor-prognosis breast cancer. 8q22 genomic gain was identified by this approach and validated in an extensive collection of breast tumor samples. Regional gain of 8q22 elevates expression of the metastasis gene metadherin (MTDH), which is overexpressed in more than 40% of breast cancers and is associated with poor clinical outcomes. Functional characterization of MTDH revealed its dual role in promoting metastatic seeding and enhancing chemoresistance. These findings establish MTDH as an important therapeutic target for simultaneously enhancing chemotherapy efficacy and reducing metastasis risk.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19111877
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8957
      1. Author :
        Noberini, R.; Koolpe, M.; Lamberto, I.; Pasquale, E. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Pharmacol Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        66
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Animals; COS Cells; Catechin/analogs & derivatives/chemistry/pharmacology; Cell Line; Cercopithecus aethiops; Ephrins/*metabolism; Mice; Polyphenols/*chemistry/*pharmacology; Protein Binding/drug effects; Protein Interaction Maps/*drug effects; Receptor, EphA4/antagonists & inhibitors/metabolism; Receptors, Eph Family/antagonists & inhibitors/*metabolism; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Small Molecule Libraries/chemistry/pharmacology; Tea/*chemistry
      12. Abstract :
        Tea contains a variety of bioactive chemicals, such as catechins and other polyphenols. These compounds are thought to be responsible for the health benefits of tea consumption by affecting the function of many cellular targets, not all of which have been identified. In a high-throughput screen for small molecule antagonists of the EphA4 receptor tyrosine kinase, we identified five tea polyphenols that substantially inhibit EphA4 binding to a synthetic peptide ligand. Further characterization of theaflavin monogallates from black tea and epigallocatechin-3,5-digallate from green tea revealed that these compounds at low micromolar concentrations also inhibit binding of the natural ephrin ligands to EphA4 and several other Eph receptors in in vitro assays. The compounds behave as competitive EphA4 antagonists, and their inhibitory activity is affected by amino acid mutations within the ephrin binding pocket of EphA4. In contrast, the major green tea catechin, epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), does not appear to be an effective Eph receptor antagonist. In cell culture assays, theaflavin monogallates and epigallocatechin-3,5-digallate inhibit ephrin-induced tyrosine phosphorylation (activation) of Eph receptors and endothelial capillary-like tube formation. However, the wider spectrum of Eph receptors affected by the tea derivatives in cells suggests additional mechanisms of inhibition besides interfering with ephrin binding. These results show that tea polyphenols derived from both black and green tea can suppress the biological activities of Eph receptors. Thus, the Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family represents an important class of targets for tea-derived phytochemicals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22750215
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 17
      15. Serial :
        10533
      1. Author :
        Shiota, M.; Zardan, A.; Takeuchi, A.; Kumano, M.; Beraldi, E.; Naito, S.; Zoubeidi, A.; Gleave, M. E.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        72
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Base Sequence; Blotting, Western; Chromatin Immunoprecipitation; Clusterin/genetics/*physiology; DNA Primers; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition/*physiology; Humans; Male; Mice; *Neoplasm Metastasis; Nuclear Proteins/*physiology; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Prostatic Neoplasms/*pathology; Reverse Transcriptase Polymerase Chain Reaction; Transforming Growth Factor beta/*physiology; Twist Transcription Factor/*physiology
      12. Abstract :
        TGF-beta promotes epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) and induces clusterin (CLU) expression, linking these genes to cancer metastasis. CLU is a pleiotropic molecular chaperone that confers survival and proliferative advantage to cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanisms by which TGF-beta regulates CLU expression and CLU affects metastasis remain unknown. In this study, we report that the transcription factor Twist1 mediates TGF-beta-induced CLU expression. By binding to E-boxes in the distal promoter region of CLU gene, Twist1 regulated basal and TGF-beta-induced CLU transcription. In addition, CLU reduction reduced TGF-beta induction of the mesenchymal markers, N-cadherin and fibronectin, thereby inhibiting the migratory and invasive properties induced by TGF-beta. Targeted inhibition of CLU also suppressed metastasis in an in vivo model. Taken together, our findings indicate that CLU is an important mediator of TGF-beta-induced EMT, and suggest that CLU suppression may represent a promising therapeutic option for suppressing prostate cancer metastatic progression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22896337
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10540
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10548
      1. Author :
        Gule, N. P.; de Kwaadsteniet, M.; Cloete, T. E.; Klumperman, B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Water Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen5, Xen39, Xen26, Xen14, Xen36, Xen 5, Xen 39, Xen 26, Xen 14, Xen 36, Psuedomonas aeruginosa, S. aureus, Klebsiella, E. coli, Salmonella,
      12. Abstract :
        The 3(2H) furanone derivative 2,5-dimethyl-4-hydroxy-3(2H)-furanone (DMHF) was investigated for its antimicrobial and cell-adhesion inhibition properties against Klebsiella pneumoniae Xen 39, Staphylococcus aureus Xen 36, Escherichia coli Xen 14, Pseudomonas aeruginosa Xen 5 and Salmonella typhimurium Xen 26. Nanofibers electrospun from solution blends of DMHF and poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) were tested for their ability to inhibit surface-attachment of bacteria. Antimicrobial and adhesion inhibition activity was determined via the plate counting technique. To quantify viable but non-culturable cells and to validate the plate counting results, bioluminescence and fluorescence studies were carried out. Nanofiber production was upscaled using the bubble electrospinning technique. To ascertain that no DMHF leached into filtered water, samples of water filtered through the nanofibrous mats were analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and attenuated total reflectance-Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) were used to characterize the electrospun nanofibers.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23261340
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10549
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