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      1. Author :
        Apidianakis, Y.; Mindrinos, M. N.; Xiao, W.; Tegos, G. P.; Papisov, M. I.; Hamblin, M. R.; Davis, R. W.; Tompkins, R. G.; Rahme, L. G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, Xen5
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in our understanding the pathophysiology of trauma, the basis of the predisposition of trauma patients to infection remains unclear. A Drosophila melanogaster/Pseudomonas aeruginosa injury and infection model was used to identify host genetic components that contribute to the hyper-susceptibility to infection that follows severe trauma. We show that P. aeruginosa compromises skeletal muscle gene (SMG) expression at the injury site to promote infection. We demonstrate that activation of SMG structural components is under the control of cJun-N-terminal Kinase (JNK) Kinase, Hemipterous (Hep), and activation of this pathway promotes local resistance to P. aeruginosa in flies and mice. Our study links SMG expression and function to increased susceptibility to infection, and suggests that P. aeruginosa affects SMG homeostasis locally by restricting SMG expression in injured skeletal muscle tissue. Local potentiation of these host responses, and/or inhibition of their suppression by virulent P. aeruginosa cells, could lead to novel therapies that prevent or treat deleterious and potentially fatal infections in severely injured individuals.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18159239
      14. Call Number :
        135889
      15. Serial :
        6705
      1. Author :
        Sharma, Praveen K; Singh, Rajesh; Novakovic, Kristian R; Eaton, John W; Grizzle, William E; Singh, Shailesh
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        International journal of cancer. Journal international du cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        127
      8. Issue :
        9
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Chemokines, CC; Disease Progression; Enzyme Activation; Etoposide; Humans; Male; Mice; Mice, Nude; PC-3M-luc; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases; Prostatic Neoplasms; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt; Receptors, CCR; Signal Transduction
      12. Abstract :
        Despite recent advances in treatment and management of prostate cancer (PCa), it remains the second leading cause of cancer-related deaths among men in the US. Chemotherapy is one of the treatment alternatives for hormone refractory metastatic PCa. However, current chemotherapeutic regimens provide palliative benefit but relatively modest survival advantage primarily due to chemo-resistance and upregulated antiapoptotic machineries in PCa cells. Therefore, blocking the mechanisms responsible for suppression of apoptosis might improve current chemotherapeutic regimens. In this study, we show that CC chemokine receptor-9 (CCR9) and its natural ligand CCL25 interaction upregulates antiapoptotic proteins (i.e., PI3K, AKT, ERK1/2 and GSK-3beta) and downregulate activation of caspase-3 in PCa cells. Significant downregulation of these CCR9-mediated antiapoptotic proteins in the presence of a PI3K inhibitor (wortmannin), further suggests that the antiapoptotic action of CCR9 is primarily regulated through PI3K. Furthermore, the cytotoxic effect of etoposide was significantly inhibited in the presence of CCL25, and this inhibitory effect of CCL25 was abrogated when CCR9-CCL25 interaction was blocked using anti-CCR9 monoclonal antibodies. In conformation to these in vitro studies, significant reduction in tumor burden was found in mice receiving CCL25 neutralizing antibodies and etoposide together as compared to both as a single agent. These results suggest that the CCR9-CCL25 axis mediates PI3K/AKT-dependent antiapoptotic signals in PCa cells and could be a possible reason for low apoptosis and modest chemotherapeutic response. Therefore, targeting CCR9-CCL25 axis with cytotoxic agents may provide better therapeutic outcomes than using cytotoxic agents alone.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20127861
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8945
      1. Author :
        Beckers, Annelies; Organe, Sophie; Timmermans, Leen; Scheys, Katryn; Peeters, Annelies; Brusselmans, Koen; Verhoeven, Guido; Swinnen, Johannes V
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Cancer research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        67
      8. Issue :
        17
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetyl-CoA Carboxylase; Apoptosis; Autophagy; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Proliferation; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Fatty Acids; Humans; Macrolides; Male; Neoplasms; Palmitic Acid; PC-3M-luc; Phospholipids; Prostatic Neoplasms; Tumor Cells, Cultured
      12. Abstract :
        Development and progression of cancer is accompanied by marked changes in the expression and activity of enzymes involved in the cellular homeostasis of fatty acids. One class of enzymes that play a particularly important role in this process are the acetyl-CoA carboxylases (ACC). ACCs produce malonyl-CoA, an intermediate metabolite that functions as substrate for fatty acid synthesis and as negative regulator of fatty acid oxidation. Here, using the potent ACC inhibitor soraphen A, a macrocyclic polyketide from myxobacteria, we show that ACC activity in cancer cells is essential for proliferation and survival. Even at nanomolar concentrations, soraphen A can block fatty acid synthesis and stimulate fatty acid oxidation in LNCaP and PC-3M prostate cancer cells. As a result, the phospholipid content of cancer cells decreased, and cells stopped proliferating and ultimately died. LNCaP cells predominantly died through apoptosis, whereas PC-3M cells showed signs of autophagy. Supplementation of the culture medium with exogenous palmitic acid completely abolished the effects of soraphen A and rescued the cells from cell death. Interestingly, when added to cultures of premalignant BPH-1 cells, soraphen A only slightly affected cell proliferation and did not induce cell death. Together, these findings indicate that cancer cells have become dependent on ACC activity to provide the cell with a sufficient supply of fatty acids to permit proliferation and survival, introducing the concept of using small-molecule ACC inhibitors as therapeutic agents for cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17804731
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8974
      1. Author :
        Asai, T.; Matsushita, S.; Kenjo, E.; Tsuzuku, T.; Yonenaga, N.; Koide, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Dewa, T.; Nango, M.; Maeda, N.; Kikuchi, H.; Oku, N.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Bioconjug Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        22
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals, B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2; Base Sequence; Cell Line, Tumor; Cholesterol/metabolism; Ethylenediamines/*chemistry; Fibrosarcoma/metabolism/pathology; Gene Silencing; Humans; Injections, Intravenous; Liposomes/administration & dosage/chemical; synthesis/*chemistry/pharmacokinetics; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Molecular Imaging; Phosphoric Acid Esters/*chemistry; Polyethylene Glycols/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/genetics/*metabolism; Spectrophotometry, Infrared
      12. Abstract :
        Dicetyl phosphate-tetraethylenepentamine (DCP-TEPA) conjugate was newly synthesized and formed into liposomes for efficient siRNA delivery. Formulation of DCP-TEPA-based polycation liposomes (TEPA-PCL) complexed with siRNA was examined by performing knockdown experiments using stable EGFP-transfected HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells and siRNA for GFP. An adequate amount of DCP-TEPA in TEPA-PCL and N/P ratio of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes were determined based on the knockdown efficiency. Then, the biodistribution of TEPA-PCL modified with poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) was examined in BALB/c mice. As a result, TEPA-PCL modified with PEG6000 avoided reticuloendothelial system uptake and showed long circulation in the bloodstream. On the other hand, PEGylation of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes caused dissociation of a portion of the siRNA from the liposomes. However, we found that the use of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA improved the interaction between TEPA-PCL and siRNA, which allowed PEGylation of TEPA-PCL/siRNA complexes without siRNA dissociation. In addition, TEPA-PCL complexed with cholesterol-conjugated siRNA showed potent knockdown efficiency in stable luciferase-transfected B16-F10 murine melanoma cells. Finally, the biodistribution of cholesterol-conjugated siRNA formulated in PEGylated TEPA-PCL was examined by performing near-infrared fluorescence imaging in Colon26 NL-17 murine carcinoma-bearing mice. Our results showed that tumor targeting with siRNA via systemic administration was achieved by using PEGylated TEPA-PCL combined with active targeting with Ala-Pro-Arg-Pro-Gly, a peptide used for targeting angiogenic endothelium.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21361311
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10347
      1. Author :
        Cernak, I.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Front Neurol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, RediJect Inflammation Probe, chemiluminescence, XenoLight
      12. Abstract :
        Due to complex injurious environment where multiple blast effects interact with the body parallel, blast-induced neurotrauma is a unique clinical entity induced by systemic, local, and cerebral responses. Activation of autonomous nervous system; sudden pressure increase in vital organs such as lungs and liver; and activation of neuroendocrine-immune system are among the most important mechanisms that contribute significantly to molecular changes and cascading injury mechanisms in the brain. It has been hypothesized that vagally mediated cerebral effects play a vital role in the early response to blast: this assumption has been supported by experiments where bilateral vagotomy mitigated bradycardia, hypotension, and apnea, and also prevented excessive metabolic alterations in the brain of animals exposed to blast. Clinical experience suggests specific blast-body-nervous system interactions such as (1) direct interaction with the head either through direct passage of the blast wave through the skull or by causing acceleration and/or rotation of the head; and (2) via hydraulic interaction, when the blast overpressure compresses the abdomen and chest, and transfers its kinetic energy to the body's fluid phase, initiating oscillating waves that traverse the body and reach the brain. Accumulating evidence suggests that inflammation plays important role in the pathogenesis of long-term neurological deficits due to blast. These include memory decline, motor function and balance impairments, and behavioral alterations, among others. Experiments using rigid body- or head protection in animals subjected to blast showed that head protection failed to prevent inflammation in the brain or reduce neurological deficits, whereas body protection was successful in alleviating the blast-induced functional and morphological impairments in the brain.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21206523
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10420
      1. Author :
        Fu, A.; Wilson, R. J.; Smith, B. R.; Mullenix, J.; Earhart, C.; Akin, D.; Guccione, S.; Wang, S. X.; Gambhir, S. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        ACS Nano
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        AngioSense, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Fluorescent Dyes/*chemistry/*diagnostic use; Glioblastoma/*pathology; Humans; Magnetic Fields; Magnetite Nanoparticles/*diagnostic use; Materials Testing; Mice; Mice, SCID; Microscopy, Fluorescence/*methods; Nanocapsules/*chemistry/ultrastructure; Particle Size
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection and targeted therapy are two major challenges in the battle against cancer. Novel imaging contrast agents and targeting approaches are greatly needed to improve the sensitivity and specificity of cancer theranostic agents. Here, we implemented a novel approach using a magnetic micromesh and biocompatible fluorescent magnetic nanoparticles (FMN) to magnetically enhance cancer targeting in living subjects. This approach enables magnetic targeting of systemically administered individual FMN, containing a single 8 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide core. Using a human glioblastoma mouse model, we show that nanoparticles can be magnetically retained in both the tumor neovasculature and surrounding tumor tissues. Magnetic accumulation of nanoparticles within the neovasculature was observable by fluorescence intravital microscopy in real time. Finally, we demonstrate that such magnetically enhanced cancer targeting augments the biological functions of molecules linked to the nanoparticle surface.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22857784
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 5
      15. Serial :
        10434
      1. Author :
        Kim, J. B.; Urban, K.; Cochran, E.; Lee, S.; Ang, A.; Rice, B.; Bata, A.; Campbell, K.; Coffee, R.; Gorodinsky, A.; Lu, Z.; Zhou, H.; Kishimoto, T. K.; Lassota, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, Xenogen, VIS, 4T1-luc2, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Female; Genetic Vectors/genetics; Lentivirus/genetics; Luciferases/genetics/*metabolism; Luminescent Measurements/instrumentation/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/diagnosis/metabolism/secondary; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/diagnosis/genetics/*metabolism; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms/genetics/metabolism/pathology; Sensitivity and Specificity; Time Factors; Transfection; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection of tumors can significantly improve the outcome of tumor treatment. One of the most frequently asked questions in cancer imaging is how many cells can be detected non-invasively in a live animal. Although many factors limit such detection, increasing the light emission from cells is one of the most effective ways of overcoming these limitations. Here, we describe development and utilization of a lentiviral vector containing enhanced firefly luciferase (luc2) gene. The resulting single cell clones of the mouse mammary gland tumor (4T1-luc2) showed stable light emission in the range of 10,000 photons/sec/cell. In some cases individual 4T1-luc2 cells inserted under the skin of a nu/nu mouse could be detected non-invasively using a cooled CCD camera in some cases. In addition, we showed that only few cells are needed to develop tumors in these mice and tumor progression can be monitored right after the cells are implanted. Significantly higher luciferase activity in these cells allowed us to detect micrometastases in both, syngeneic Balb/c and nu/nu mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&dopt=Citation&list_uids=20186331
      14. Call Number :
        139615
      15. Serial :
        7111
      1. Author :
        Kim, Jae-Beom; Urban, Konnie; Cochran, Edward; Lee, Steve; Ang, Angel; Rice, Bradley; Bata, Adam; Campbell, Kenneth; Coffee, Richard; Gorodinsky, Alex; Lu, Zhan; Zhou, He; Kishimoto, Takashi Kei; Lassota, Peter
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        PloS one
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2; Animals; Bicuculline; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Diagnostic Imaging; Female; Genetic Vectors; Lentivirus; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Mice, Nude; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms; Sensitivity and Specificity; Time Factors; Transfection; Tumor Burden
      12. Abstract :
        Early detection of tumors can significantly improve the outcome of tumor treatment. One of the most frequently asked questions in cancer imaging is how many cells can be detected non-invasively in a live animal. Although many factors limit such detection, increasing the light emission from cells is one of the most effective ways of overcoming these limitations. Here, we describe development and utilization of a lentiviral vector containing enhanced firefly luciferase (luc2) gene. The resulting single cell clones of the mouse mammary gland tumor (4T1-luc2) showed stable light emission in the range of 10,000 photons/sec/cell. In some cases individual 4T1-luc2 cells inserted under the skin of a nu/nu mouse could be detected non-invasively using a cooled CCD camera in some cases. In addition, we showed that only few cells are needed to develop tumors in these mice and tumor progression can be monitored right after the cells are implanted. Significantly higher luciferase activity in these cells allowed us to detect micrometastases in both, syngeneic Balb/c and nu/nu mice.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20186331
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8938
      1. Author :
        Griffin, A. J.; Li, L. X.; Voedisch, S.; Pabst, O.; McSorley, S. J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Infect Immun
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        79
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen26, Xen 26, Salmonella typhumurium, Animals; Anti-Bacterial Agents/therapeutic use; Cell Separation; Disease Models, Animal; Flow Cytometry; Fluoroquinolones/therapeutic use; Intestine, Small/microbiology; Lymph Nodes/*microbiology; Mesentery/immunology/microbiology; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Monocytes/immunology/*microbiology; Recurrence; Salmonella Infections, Animal/immunology/*microbiology/pathology; Salmonella typhi/immunology
      12. Abstract :
        Enteric pathogens can cause relapsing infections in a proportion of treated patients, but greater understanding of this phenomenon is hindered by the lack of appropriate animal models. We report here a robust animal model of relapsing primary typhoid that initiates after apparently successful antibiotic treatment of susceptible mice. Four days of enrofloxacin treatment were sufficient to reduce bacterial loads below detectable levels in all major organs, and mice appeared otherwise healthy. However, any interruption of further antibiotic therapy allowed renewed fecal shedding and renewed bacterial growth in systemic tissues to occur, and mice eventually succumbed to relapsing infection. In vivo imaging of luminescent Salmonella identified the mesenteric lymph nodes (MLNs) as a major reservoir of relapsing infection. A magnetic-bead enrichment strategy isolated MLN-resident CD11b(+) Gr-1(-) monocytes associated with low numbers of persistent Salmonella. However, the removal of MLNs increased the severity of typhoid relapse, demonstrating that this organ serves as a protective filter to restrain the dissemination of bacteria during antibiotic therapy. Together, these data describe a robust animal model of typhoid relapse and identify an important intestinal phagocyte subset involved in protection against the systemic spread of enteric infection.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21263018
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10559