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      1. Author :
        Burkatovskaya, Marina; Tegos, George P; Swietlik, Emilia; Demidova, Tatiana N; P Castano, Ana; Hamblin, Michael R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2006
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        27
      8. Issue :
        22
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Acetates; Alginates; Animals; Anti-Infective Agents; Bandages; Bioware; Chitosan; Glucuronic Acid; Hexuronic Acids; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Occlusive Dressings; Proteus mirabilis; Pseudomonas aeruginosa; Silver Sulfadiazine; Staphylococcus aureus; Wound Healing; Wound Infection; Xen8.1, Xen5, Xen44
      12. Abstract :
        HemCon bandage is an engineered chitosan acetate preparation used as a hemostatic control dressing, and its chemical structure suggests that it should also be antimicrobial. We tested its ability to rapidly kill bacteria in vitro and in mouse models of infected wounds. We used the Gram-negative species Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Proteus mirabilis and the Gram-positive Staphylococcus aureus that had all been stably transduced with the entire bacterial lux operon to allow in vivo bioluminescence imaging. An excisional wound in Balb/c mice was inoculated with 50-250 million cells followed after 30 min by application of HemCon bandage, alginate sponge bandage, silver sulfadiazine cream or no treatment. HemCon was more adhesive to the wound and conformed well to the injury compared to alginate. Animal survival was followed over 15 days with observations of bioluminescence emission and animal activity daily. Chitosan acetate treated mice infected with P. aeruginosa and P. mirabilis all survived while those receiving no treatment, alginate and silver sulfadiazine demonstrated 25-100% mortality. Chitosan acetate was much more effective than other treatments in rapidly reducing bioluminescence in the wound consistent with its rapid bactericidal activity in vitro as well as its light-scattering properties. S. aureus formed only non-lethal localized infections after temporary immunosuppression of the mice but HemCon was again more effective in reducing bioluminescence. The data suggest that chitosan acetate rapidly kills bacteria in the wound before systemic invasion can take place, and is superior to alginate bandage and silver sulfadiazine that may both encourage bacterial growth in the short term.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16616364
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9987
      1. Author :
        Zhou, H.; Roy, S.; Cochran, E.; Zouaoui, R.; Chu, C. L.; Duffner, J.; Zhao, G.; Smith, S.; Galcheva-Gargova, Z.; Karlgren, J.; Dussault, N.; Kwan, R. Y.; Moy, E.; Barnes, M.; Long, A.; Honan, C.; Qi, Y. W.; Shriver, Z.; Ganguly, T.; Schultes, B.; Venkataraman, G.; Kishimoto, T. K.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        PLoS One
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, 4T1-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) play a key role in shaping the tumor microenvironment by presenting growth factors, cytokines, and other soluble factors that are critical for host cell recruitment and activation, as well as promoting tumor progression, metastasis, and survival. M402 is a rationally engineered, non-cytotoxic heparan sulfate (HS) mimetic, designed to inhibit multiple factors implicated in tumor-host cell interactions, including VEGF, FGF2, SDF-1alpha, P-selectin, and heparanase. A single s.c. dose of M402 effectively inhibited seeding of B16F10 murine melanoma cells to the lung in an experimental metastasis model. Fluorescent-labeled M402 demonstrated selective accumulation in the primary tumor. Immunohistological analyses of the primary tumor revealed a decrease in microvessel density in M402 treated animals, suggesting anti-angiogenesis to be one of the mechanisms involved in-vivo. M402 treatment also normalized circulating levels of myeloid derived suppressor cells in tumor bearing mice. Chronic administration of M402, alone or in combination with cisplatin or docetaxel, inhibited spontaneous metastasis and prolonged survival in an orthotopic 4T1 murine mammary carcinoma model. These data demonstrate that modulating HSPG biology represents a novel approach to target multiple factors involved in tumor progression and metastasis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21698156
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10362
      1. Author :
        Park, Hae-Sun; Francis, Kevin P; Yu, Jun; Cleary, P Patrick
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Journal of immunology (Baltimore, Md.: 1950)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        171
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Administration, Intranasal; Animals; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Female; Humans; Immunohistochemistry; Intracellular Fluid; Lymphoid Tissue; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Mucosa; Nasopharynx; Palatine Tonsil; pXen-5; Streptococcal Infections; Streptococcus pyogenes
      12. Abstract :
        Human tonsils are suspected to be an antibiotic-impervious human reservoir for group A streptococcus. An intranasal infection model in mice and a bioluminescent-tagged strain were used to investigate this possibility. Viable streptococci were predominantly found both intra- and extracellularly in nasal-associated lymphoid tissue (NALT), a human tonsil homologue. Ulex europaeus-1, a membranous (M) cell-specific lectin, identified cells harboring streptococci at the epithelial surface of NALT and blocked bacterial colonization of this tissue. These results suggest that M cells in NALT transport this Gram-positive pathogen across the epithelial layers in a manner similar to those in Peyer's patches, which permit enteric pathogens to invade deeper tissues from the gastrointestinal tract.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/12928403
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9025
      1. Author :
        Weljie, A. M.; Bondareva, A.; Zang, P.; Jirik, F. R.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        J Biomol NMR
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        49
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-luc2, IVIS, Breast Cancer, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Hypoxia can promote invasive behavior in cancer cells and alters the response to therapeutic intervention as a result of changes in the expression many genes, including genes involved in intermediary metabolism. Although metabolomics technologies are capable of simultaneously measuring a wide range of metabolites in an untargeted manner, these methods have been relatively under utilized in the study of cancer cell responses to hypoxia. Thus, (1)H NMR metabolomics was used to examine the effects of hypoxia in the MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cell line, both in vitro and in vivo. Cell cultures were compared with respect to their metabolic responses during growth under either hypoxic (1% O(2)) or normoxic conditions. Orthogonal partial least squares discriminant analysis (OPLS-DA) was used to identify a set of metabolites that were responsive to hypoxia. Via intracardiac administration, MDA-MB-231 cells were also used to generate widespread metastatic disease in immuno-compromised mice. Serum metabolite analysis was conducted to compare animals with and without a large tumor burden. Intriguingly, using a cross-plot of the OPLS loadings, both the in vitro and in vivo samples yielded a subset of metabolites that were significantly altered by hypoxia. These included primarily energy metabolites and amino acids, indicative of known alterations in energy metabolism, and possibly protein synthesis or catabolism. The results suggest that the metabolite pattern identified might prove useful as a marker for intra-tumoral hypoxia.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21373841
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10494
      1. Author :
        Farouc A. Jaffer, Peter Libby and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        7
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; FMT; ProSense; OsteoSense; atherosclerosis; molecular imaging; optical, fluorescence; multimodality; nanoparticle
      12. Abstract :
        Imaging approaches that visualize molecular targets rather than anatomic structures aim to illuminate vital molecular and cellular aspects of atherosclerosis biology in vivo. Several such molecular imaging strategies stand ready for rapid clinical application. This review describes the growing role of in vivo optical molecular imaging in atherosclerosis and highlights its ability to visualize atheroma inflammation, calcification, and angiogenesis. In addition, we discuss advances in multimodality probes, both in the context of multimodal imaging as well as multifunctional, or “theranostic,” nanoparticles. This review highlights particular molecular imaging strategies that possess strong potential for clinical translation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2733228/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4642
      1. Author :
        Rosenzweig HL, Jann MM, Glant TT, Martin TM, Planck SR, van Eden W, van Kooten PJ, Flavell RA, Kobayashi KS, Rosenbaum JT and Davey MP
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Leukocyte Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        85
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging; NOD2; mice; inflammatory arthritis; TCR transgenic; knockout
      12. Abstract :
        In addition to its role in innate immunity, nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) has been shown to play a suppressive role in models of colitis. Notably, mutations in NOD2 cause the inherited granulomatous disease of the joints called Blau syndrome, thereby linking NOD2 with joint disease as well. However, the role of NOD2 in joint inflammation has not been clarified. We demonstrate here that NOD2 is functional within the mouse joint and promotes inflammation, as locally or systemically administered muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the NOD2 agonist) resulted in significant joint inflammation that was abolished in NOD2-deficient mice. We then sought to investigate the role of NOD2 in a mouse model of inflammatory arthritis dependent on adaptive immunity using TCR-transgenic mice whose T cells recognized the dominant epitope of proteoglycan (PG). Mice immunized with PG in the presence of MDP developed a more severe inflammatory arthritis and histopathology within the joints. Antigen-specific activation of splenocytes was enhanced by MDP with respect to IFN-gamma production, which would be consistent with the Th1-mediated disease in vivo. Intriguingly, NOD2 deficiency did not alter the PG-induced arthritis, indicating that NOD2 does not play an essential role in this model of joint disease when it is not activated by MDP. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in a model of inflammatory arthritis dependent on T and B cell priming, NOD2 activation potentiates disease. However, the absence of NOD2 does not alter the course of inflammatory arthritis, in contrast to models of intestinal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2718807/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4535
      1. Author :
        Keereweer, S.; Kerrebijn, J. D.; van Driel, P. B.; Xie, B.; Kaijzel, E. L.; Snoeks, T. J.; Que, I.; Hutteman, M.; van der Vorst, J. R.; Mieog, J. S.; Vahrmeijer, A. L.; van de Velde, C. J.; Baatenburg de Jong, R. J.; Lowik, C. W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Imaging Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        13
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IntegriSense,Animals; Fluorescent Dyes/metabolism; Humans; Nanoparticles/diagnostic use; Optics and Photonics/*methods; Surgery, Computer-Assisted/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-to-background-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20617389
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10367
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging and Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Optical imaging, Image-guided surgery, Molecular imaging, Near-infrared fluorescence
      12. Abstract :
        In cancer surgery, intra-operative assessment of the tumor-free margin, which is critical for the prognosis of the patient, relies on the visual appearance and palpation of the tumor. Optical imaging techniques provide real-time visualization of the tumor, warranting intra-operative image-guided surgery. Within this field, imaging in the near-infrared light spectrum offers two essential advantages: increased tissue penetration of light and an increased signal-tobackground-ratio of contrast agents. In this article, we review the various techniques, contrast agents, and camera systems that are currently used for image-guided surgery. Furthermore, we provide an overview of the wide range of molecular contrast agents targeting specific hallmarks of cancer and we describe perspectives on its future use in cancer surgery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.springerlink.com/content/78233815221t6563/
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4486
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