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      1. Author :
        Li, Min; Rigby, Kevin; Lai, Yuping; Nair, Vinod; Peschel, Andreas; Schittek, Birgit; Otto, Michael
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Antimicrobial agents and chemotherapy
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Anti-Bacterial Agents; Bioware; Blotting, Southern; Chromatography, Thin Layer; Computational Biology; Cytochromes c; Genetic Complementation Test; Humans; Microscopy, Electron, Scanning; Microscopy, Immunoelectron; Mutagenesis; Peptides; Phospholipids; Polymerase Chain Reaction; Staphylococcus aureus; Xen36
      12. Abstract :
        Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) form an important part of the innate host defense. In contrast to most AMPs, human dermcidin has an anionic net charge. To investigate whether bacteria have developed specific mechanisms of resistance to dermcidin, we screened for mutants of the leading human pathogen, Staphylococcus aureus, with altered resistance to dermcidin. To that end, we constructed a plasmid for use in mariner-based transposon mutagenesis and developed a high-throughput cell viability screening method based on luminescence. In a large screen, we did not find mutants with strongly increased susceptibility to dermcidin, indicating that S. aureus has no specific mechanism of resistance to this AMP. Furthermore, we detected a mutation in a gene of unknown function that resulted in significantly increased resistance to dermcidin. The mutant strain had an altered membrane phospholipid pattern and showed decreased binding of dermcidin to the bacterial surface, indicating that dermcidin interacts with membrane phospholipids. The mode of this interaction was direct, as shown by assays of dermcidin binding to phospholipid preparations, and specific, as the resistance to other AMPs was not affected. Our findings indicate that dermcidin has an exceptional value for the human innate host defense and lend support to the idea that it evolved to evade bacterial resistance mechanisms targeted at the cationic character of most AMPs. Moreover, they suggest that the antimicrobial activity of dermcidin is dependent on the interaction with the bacterial membrane and might thus assist with the determination of the yet unknown mode of action of this important human AMP.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19596877
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9983
      1. Author :
        Inglefield, Jon R; Dumitru, Calin Dan; Alkan, Sefik S; Gibson, Sheila J; Lipson, Kenneth E; Tomai, Mark A; Larson, Chris J; Vasilakos, John P
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Journal of interferon & cytokine research: the official journal of the International Society for Interferon and Cytokine Research
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        28
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aminoquinolines; Animals; B16-F10-luc-G5 cells; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cell Survival; Culture Media, Conditioned; dendritic cells; Humans; Interferon Type I; Leukocytes, Mononuclear; Lung; Melanoma; Mice; Neoplasms; Oligodeoxyribonucleotides; Quinolines; Subcellular Fractions; Sulfonamides; Toll-Like Receptor 7
      12. Abstract :
        Antitumor effects of the toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) agonist, 852A, were evaluated. Supernatants from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) stimulated with 852A inhibited the proliferation of tumor cell lines Hs294T and 769-P but had no effect on others (786-O and Caki-1). Because addition of 852A directly to the Hs294T cells did not inhibit their proliferation, the mechanism(s) of inhibition of tumor cell proliferation was investigated. Low nanomolar concentrations of 852A stimulated the production of interferon-alpha (IFN-alpha), IFN-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra), monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1), and tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) from human PBMCs. Cytokines stimulated by submicromolar concentrations of 852A were sufficient to inhibit Hs294T proliferation. At higher concentrations (3-30 microM), 852A induced the production of IL-12p70, IL-18, and IFN-gamma. PBMC cultures depleted of plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) did not produce IFN-alpha, and their conditioned medium did not inhibit Hs294T proliferation. Anti-IFN-alpha/beta receptor (IFNAR) and anti-IFN-alpha antibodies partially abrogated Hs294T proliferation inhibition by 852A-stimulated PBMC supernatants, whereas separate neutralization of TRAIL, tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha, IFN-gamma, IFN-beta, or IFN-omega had no effect. In vivo, six doses of 852A administration significantly delayed the onset of lung colonies in a B16 melanoma model. Thus, the results demonstrate that the TLR7 agonist 852A inhibits in vitro proliferation of some tumor cells in a pDC-dependent and IFN-alpha-dependent manner and can delay tumor growth in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18439103
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9001
      1. Author :
        Hickson, J; Ackler, S; Klaubert, D; Bouska, J; Ellis, P; Foster, K; Oleksijew, A; Rodriguez, L; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Frost, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cell death and differentiation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Firefly Luciferin; Humans; Luminescent Agents; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Molecular Imaging; Neoplasms; Oligopeptides; Taxoids
      12. Abstract :
        Apoptosis is a highly regulated process of programmed cell death essential for normal physiology. Dysregulation of apoptosis contributes to the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic heart failure. Quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in preclinical models would allow for dynamic longitudinal screening of compounds and facilitates a more rapid determination of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we report the in vivo characterization of Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin, a modified firefly luciferase substrate that in apoptotic cells is cleaved by caspase-3 to liberate aminoluciferin, which can be consumed by luciferase to generate a luminescent signal. In two oncology models, namely SKOV3-luc and MDA-MB-231-luc-LN, at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment with docetaxel, animals were injected with Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin and bioluminescent images were acquired. Significantly more light was detected at 24 (P<0.05), 48 (P<0.01), and 72 h (P<0.01) in the docetaxel-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group, with caspase-3 activation at these time points confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Importantly, whereas significant differences between groups were detected as early as 24 h after treatment by molecular imaging, caliper measurements were unable to detect a difference for 4-5 additional days. Taken together, these data show that in vivo imaging of apoptosis using Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin could provide a sensitive and rapid method for early detection of drug efficacy, which could potentially be used by numerous therapeutic programs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20057500
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8950
      1. Author :
        Georgel, P.; Radosavljevic, M.; Macquin, C.; Bahram, S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Mol Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        48
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Xen14, Xen 14, E. coli Xen14, IVIS, Animals; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Histocompatibility Antigens Class I/genetics/*immunology; Humans; Klebsiella Infections/*immunology/prevention & control; Klebsiella pneumoniae/*immunology; Male; Mice; Mice, Inbred C57BL; Mice, Knockout
      12. Abstract :
        As opposed to the well established role of MHC-linked, polymorphic, class I (MHC-I) genes in adaptive immunity, a universal role for non-conventional MHC-I is unknown, thus requiring a case-by-case study. The MHC unlinked, monomorphic, but beta(2)microglobulin (beta(2)m)-associated “MHC class I related” MR1 molecule interacts with a semi-invariant TCR. The pathophysiology of this interaction or more importantly of this peculiar MHC-I remains mostly unknown. Recently it was shown that beta(2)m deficient mice were more susceptible to infection by Klebsiella pneumoniae, a widely spread Gram-negative bacteria that causes diverse and often severe ailments in man. Here we demonstrate, using both an in vivo imaging system and survival tests, the increased susceptibility to K. pneumoniae (but not to several other Gram negative bacteria) of MR1 deficient mice. This is accompanied by a consequent change in body temperature and systemic cytokine profile. Hence MR1 controls K. pneumoniae infection in vivo.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21190736
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10392
      1. Author :
        Hanai, J.; Doro, N.; Sasaki, A. T.; Kobayashi, S.; Cantley, L. C.; Seth, P.; Sukhatme, V. P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Cell Physiol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        227
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, ATP Citrate (pro-S)-Lyase/*antagonists & inhibitors/genetics; Animals; Apoptosis; Cell Cycle; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Combined Modality Therapy; Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transition; Female; Gene Knockdown Techniques; Humans; Hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA Reductase Inhibitors/*therapeutic use; Lung Neoplasms/*drug therapy/enzymology/pathology/*therapy; MAP Kinase Signaling System/drug effects; Mice; Mutation; Phosphatidylinositol 3-Kinases/antagonists & inhibitors; Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-akt/antagonists & inhibitors; Receptor, Epidermal Growth Factor/genetics; Signal Transduction/drug effects; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        ATP citrate lyase (ACL) catalyzes the conversion of cytosolic citrate to acetyl-CoA and oxaloacetate. A definitive role for ACL in tumorigenesis has emerged from ACL RNAi and chemical inhibitor studies, showing that ACL inhibition limits tumor cell proliferation and survival and induces differentiation in vitro. In vivo, it reduces tumor growth leading to a cytostatic effect and induces differentiation. However, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood and agents that could enhance the efficacy of ACL inhibition have not been identified. Our studies focus on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) lines, which show phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/AKT activation secondary to a mutation in the K-Ras gene or the EGFR gene. Here we show that ACL knockdown promotes apoptosis and differentiation, leading to the inhibition of tumor growth in vivo. Moreover, in contrast to most studies, which elucidate how activation/suppression of signaling pathways can modify metabolism, we show that inhibition of a metabolic pathway “reverse signals” and attenuates PI3K/AKT signaling. Additionally, we find that statins, inhibitors of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase, which act downstream of ACL in the cholesterol synthesis pathway, dramatically enhance the anti-tumor effects of ACL inhibition, even regressing established tumors. With statin treatment, both PI3K/AKT and the MAPK pathways are affected. Moreover, this combined treatment is able to reduce the growth of EGF receptor resistant tumor cell types. Given the essential role of lipid synthesis in numerous cancers, this work may impact therapy in a broad range of tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21688263
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 10
      15. Serial :
        10523
      1. Author :
        Shimomura, Toshiyasu; Hasako, Shinichi; Nakatsuru, Yoko; Mita, Takashi; Ichikawa, Koji; Kodera, Tsutomu; Sakai, Takumi; Nambu, Tadahiro; Miyamoto, Mayu; Takahashi, Ikuko; Miki, Satomi; Kawanishi, Nobuhiko; Ohkubo, Mitsuru; Kotani, Hidehito; Iwasawa, Yoshikazu
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Molecular cancer therapeutics
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Antineoplastic Combined Chemotherapy Protocols; Bioware; Cell Death; Cell Line, Tumor; Cell Proliferation; Cyclohexanecarboxylic Acids; HeLa-luc; Humans; Inhibitory Concentration 50; Mice; Mitosis; Protein kinase inhibitors; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases; Rats; Taxoids; Thiazoles; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Aurora-A kinase is a one of the key regulators during mitosis progression. Aurora-A kinase is a potential target for anticancer therapies because overexpression of Aurora-A, which is frequently observed in some human cancers, results in aberrant mitosis leading to chromosomal instability and possibly tumorigenesis. MK-5108 is a novel small molecule with potent inhibitory activity against Aurora-A kinase. Although most of the Aurora-kinase inhibitors target both Aurora-A and Aurora-B, MK-5108 specifically inhibited Aurora-A kinase in a panel of protein kinase assays. Inhibition of Aurora-A by MK-5108 in cultured cells induced cell cycle arrest at the G(2)-M phase in flow cytometry analysis. The effect was confirmed by the accumulation of cells with expression of phosphorylated Histone H3 and inhibition of Aurora-A autophosphorylation by immunostaining assays. MK-5108 also induced phosphorylated Histone H3 in skin and xenograft tumor tissues in a nude rat xenograft model. MK-5108 inhibited growth of human tumor cell lines in culture and in different xenograft models. Furthermore, the combination of MK-5108 and docetaxel showed enhanced antitumor activities compared with control and docetaxel alone-treated animals without exacerbating the adverse effects of docetaxel. MK-5108 is currently tested in clinical trials and offers a new therapeutic approach to combat human cancers as a single agent or in combination with existing taxane therapies.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20053775
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9006
      1. Author :
        Cerchia, L.; Esposito, C. L.; Camorani, S.; Rienzo, A.; Stasio, L.; Insabato, L.; Affuso, A.; de Franciscis, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Mol Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware
      12. Abstract :
        Axl is a tyrosine kinase receptor that was first identified as a transforming gene in human myeloid leukemia. Recent converging evidence suggests its implication in cancer progression and invasion for several solid tumors, including lung, breast, brain, thyroid, and pancreas. In the last decade, Axl has thus become an attractive target for therapeutic development of more aggressive cancers. An emerging class of therapeutic inhibitors is now represented by short nucleic acid aptamers. These molecules act as high affinity ligands with several advantages over conventional antibodies for their use in vivo, including their small size and negligible immunogenicity. Furthermore, these molecules can easily form conjugates able to drive the specific delivery of interfering RNAs, nanoparticles, or chemotherapeutics. We have thus generated and characterized a selective RNA-based aptamer, GL21.T that binds the extracellular domain of Axl at high affinity (12 nmol/l) and inhibits its catalytic activity. GL21.T blocked Axl-dependent transducing events in vitro, including Erk and Akt phosphorylation, cell migration and invasion, as well as in vivo lung tumor formation in mice xenografts. In this respect, the GL21.T aptamer represents a promising therapeutic molecule for Axl-dependent cancers whose importance is highlighted by the paucity of available Axl-specific inhibitory molecules.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22910292
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 3
      15. Serial :
        10520
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        PLoS pathogens
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        3
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Anthrax; Bacillus anthracis; Bioware; Disease Models, Animal; Gastrointestinal Diseases; Inhalation Exposure; Luciferases; Luminescence; Luminescent Measurements; Lymph Nodes; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nasal Cavity; Organisms, Genetically Modified; Peyer's Patches; Pharynx; pXen-5; Skin; Spores, Bacterial
      12. Abstract :
        Bacillus anthracis causes three forms of anthrax: inhalational, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous. Anthrax is characterized by both toxemia, which is caused by secretion of immunomodulating toxins (lethal toxin and edema toxin), and septicemia, which is associated with bacterial encapsulation. Here we report that, contrary to the current view of B. anthracis pathogenesis, B. anthracis spores germinate and establish infections at the initial site of inoculation in both inhalational and cutaneous infections without needing to be transported to draining lymph nodes, and that inhaled spores establish initial infection in nasal-associated lymphoid tissues. Furthermore, we found that Peyer's patches in the mouse intestine are the primary site of bacterial growth after intragastric inoculation, thus establishing an animal model of gastrointestinal anthrax. All routes of infection progressed to the draining lymph nodes, spleen, lungs, and ultimately the blood. These discoveries were made possible through the development of a novel dynamic mouse model of B. anthracis infection using bioluminescent non-toxinogenic capsulated bacteria that can be visualized within the mouse in real-time, and demonstrate the value of in vivo imaging in the analysis of B. anthracis infection. Our data imply that previously unrecognized portals of bacterial entry demand more intensive investigation, and will significantly transform the current perception of inhalational, gastrointestinal, and cutaneous B. anthracis pathogenesis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17542645
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9022
      1. Author :
        Ignat M, Aprahamian M, Lindner V, Altmeyer A, Perretta S, Dallemagne B, Mutter D and Marescaux J
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Gastroenterology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        137
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; AngioSense; AngioSpark; in vivo imaging; pancreatic cancer
      12. Abstract :
        BACKGROUND & AIMS: Surgical management of pancreatic cancer depends on tumor resectability and staging. This study evaluated a new in vivo technique, fiberoptic confocal fluorescence microscopy (FCFM), for detection and staging of pancreatic tumors in rats.

        METHODS: FCFM was used with a protease-activated fluorescent marker (ProSense; VisEn Medical Inc, Woburn, MA) for in vivo imaging of solid organs (1.8-microm resolution) in a rat model of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma. A preliminary study described the FCFM rendering of normal and pathologic tissues. Subsequently, 2 double-blind studies compared FCFM to standard histology in (1) detection of tumors in rat models of cancer and controls and (2) detection of nodal involvement (splenic, celiac, mesenteric, and colic) 4, 5, and 6 weeks after tumor induction vs controls.

        RESULTS: Tumor cells displayed a fluorescent ductal pattern compared with non-fluorescent normal pancreas or normal follicular pattern of lymph nodes (LNs). FCFM detected all the pancreatic tumors (1.7-mm mean diameter) and identified 23 LNs that contained metastases of 99 LNs examined. Standard histologic analyses resulted in 1 false-negative result in tumor detection and 2 false negatives in LN detection, whereas FCFM produced no false-negative results. Additional serial sectioning confirmed all tumors and 16 metastatic LNs; FCFM had a negative predictive value of 100% and a positive predictive value of 69.6%.

        CONCLUSIONS: Real-time “virtual biopsy” using FCFM detects tumors and LN metastases with 100% sensitivity and 92.2% specificity in rats, making it a reliable technique for detection and staging of pancreatic cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19632230
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4540
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