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      1. Author :
        Woelfle, Mark A; Xu, Yao; Qin, Ximing; Johnson, Carl Hirschie
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        104
      8. Issue :
        47
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; Circadian Rhythm; Cyanobacteria; DNA, Bacterial; DNA, Superhelical; Gene Expression Regulation, Bacterial; Light; Plasmids; Promoter Regions, Genetic; pXen-13; Transcription, Genetic
      12. Abstract :
        The cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus expresses robust circadian (daily) rhythms under the control of the KaiABC-based core clockwork. Unlike eukaryotic circadian systems characterized thus far, the cyanobacterial clockwork modulates gene expression patterns globally and specific clock gene promoters are not necessary in mediating the circadian feedback loop. The oscilloid model postulates that global rhythms of transcription are based on rhythmic changes in the status of the cyanobacterial chromosome that are ultimately controlled by the KaiABC oscillator. By using a nonessential, cryptic plasmid (pANS) as a reporter of the superhelical state of DNA in cyanobacteria, we show that the supercoiling status of this plasmid changes in a circadian manner in vivo. The rhythm of topological change in the plasmid is conditional; this change is rhythmic in constant light and in light/dark cycles, but not in constant darkness. In further support of the oscilloid model, cyanobacterial promoters that are removed from their native chromosomal locations and placed on a plasmid preserve their circadian expression patterns.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18000054
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9031
      1. Author :
        Ale, A.; Ermolayev, V.; Herzog, E.; Cohrs, C.; de Angelis, M. H.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Methods
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bone Remodeling; Disease Models, Animal; Equipment Design; Female; Fluorescence; Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/radiography; Mice; Osteogenesis Imperfecta/pathology/radiography; Tomography, Optical/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360 degrees imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561987
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 29
      15. Serial :
        10363
      1. Author :
        Ale, A.; Ermolayev, V.; Herzog, E.; Cohrs, C.; de Angelis, M. H.; Ntziachristos, V.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Nat Methods
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        9
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Remodeling; Disease Models, Animal; Equipment Design; Female; Fluorescence; Head and Neck Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Image Processing, Computer-Assisted/*methods; Lung Neoplasms/pathology/radiography; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/radiography; Mice; Osteogenesis Imperfecta/pathology/radiography; Tomography, Optical/*methods; Tomography, X-Ray Computed/*methods
      12. Abstract :
        The development of hybrid optical tomography methods to improve imaging performance has been suggested over a decade ago and has been experimentally demonstrated in animals and humans. Here we examined in vivo performance of a camera-based hybrid fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) system for 360 degrees imaging combined with X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Offering an accurately co-registered, information-rich hybrid data set, FMT-XCT has new imaging possibilities compared to stand-alone FMT and XCT. We applied FMT-XCT to a subcutaneous 4T1 tumor mouse model, an Aga2 osteogenesis imperfecta model and a Kras lung cancer mouse model, using XCT information during FMT inversion. We validated in vivo imaging results against post-mortem planar fluorescence images of cryoslices and histology data. Besides offering concurrent anatomical and functional information, FMT-XCT resulted in the most accurate FMT performance to date. These findings indicate that addition of FMT optics into the XCT gantry may be a potent upgrade for small-animal XCT systems.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22561987
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 12
      15. Serial :
        10468
      1. Author :
        Baoum, A.; Ovcharenko, D.; Berkland, C.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Int J Pharm
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        427
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8, A549-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Calcium/chemistry; Cell Line; Cell-Penetrating Peptides/administration & dosage/*chemistry; Drug Carriers/administration & dosage/adverse effects/*chemistry; *Gene Silencing; Genetic Therapy/*methods; Humans; Luciferases; Nanoparticles/administration & dosage/chemistry; RNA, Small Interfering/*administration & dosage/chemistry; Tissue Distribution
      12. Abstract :
        The development of short-interfering RNA (siRNA) offers new strategies for manipulating specific genes responsible for pathological disorders. Myriad cationic polymer and lipid formulations have been explored, but an effective, non-toxic carrier remains a major barrier to clinical translation. Among the emerging candidates for siRNA carriers are cell penetrating peptides (CPPs), which can traverse the plasma membrane and facilitate the intracellular delivery of siRNA. Previously, a highly efficient and non-cytotoxic means of gene delivery was designed by complexing plasmid DNA with CPPs, then condensing with calcium. Here, the CPP TAT and a longer, 'double' TAT (dTAT) were investigated as potential carriers for siRNA. Various N/P ratios and calcium concentrations were used to optimize siRNA complexes in vitro. Upon addition of calcium, 'loose' siRNA/CPP complexes were condensed into small nanoparticles. Knockdown of luciferase expression in the human epithelial lung cell line A549-luc-C8 was high (up to 93%) with no evidence of cytotoxicity. Selected formulations of the dTAT complexes were dosed intravenously up to 1000 mg/kg with minimal toxicity. Biodistribution studies revealed high levels of gene knockdown in the lung and muscle tissue suggesting these simple vectors may offer a translatable approach to siRNA delivery.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21856394
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10519
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Annals of the New York Academy of Sciences
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1192
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Biofilms; Bioware; Bone Density Conservation Agents; Chronic Disease; Cytokines; Drug Evaluation, Preclinical; Humans; Immunity; Incidence; Jaw Diseases; Mice; Neovascularization, Physiologic; Osteoclasts; Osteomyelitis; Osteonecrosis; Staphylococcal Infections; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        The effects of antiresorptive agents (e.g., alendronate [Aln], osteoprotegerin [OPG]) on bone infection are unknown. Thus, their effects on implant-associated osteomyelitis (OM) were investigated in mice using PBS (placebo), gentamycin, and etanercept (TNFR:Fc) controls. None of the drugs affected humoral immunity, angiogenesis, or chronic infection. However, the significant (P < 0.05 vs. PBS) inhibition of cortical osteolysis and decreased draining lymph node size in Aln- and OPG-treated mice was associated with a significant (P < 0.05) increase in the incidence of high-grade infections during the establishment of OM. In contrast, the high-grade infections in TNFR:Fc-treated mice were associated with immunosuppression, as evidenced by the absence of granulomas and presence of Gram(+) biofilm in the bone marrow. Collectively, these findings indicate that although antiresorptive agents do not exacerbate chronic OM, they can increase the bacterial load during early infection by decreasing lymphatic drainage and preventing the removal of necrotic bone that harbors the bacteria.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20392222
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9034
      1. Author :
        Close, P.; Gillard, M.; Ladang, A.; Jiang, Z.; Papuga, J.; Hawkes, N.; Nguyen, L.; Chapelle, J. P.; Bouillenne, F.; Svejstrup, J.; Fillet, M.; Chariot, A.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        287
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        IVIS, B16-F10-luc-G5, B16F10-luc-G5, B16-F10-luc, B16F10-luc, Carrier Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Line, Tumor; *Cell Movement; Gene Deletion; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Melanoma/genetics/*metabolism/pathology; Multiprotein Complexes/genetics/*metabolism; Neoplasm Invasiveness; Neoplasm Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; Proteins/genetics/*metabolism; RNA Polymerase II/genetics/metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The Elongator complex is composed of 6 subunits (Elp1-Elp6) and promotes RNAPII transcript elongation through histone acetylation in the nucleus as well as tRNA modification in the cytoplasm. This acetyltransferase complex directly or indirectly regulates numerous biological processes ranging from exocytosis and resistance to heat shock in yeast to cell migration and neuronal differentiation in higher eukaryotes. The identity of human ELP1 through ELP4 has been reported but human ELP5 and ELP6 have remained uncharacterized. Here, we report that DERP6 (ELP5) and C3ORF75 (ELP6) encode these subunits of human Elongator. We further investigated the importance and function of these two subunits by a combination of biochemical analysis and cellular assays. Our results show that DERP6/ELP5 is required for the integrity of Elongator and directly connects ELP3 to ELP4. Importantly, the migration and tumorigenicity of melanoma-derived cells are significantly decreased upon Elongator depletion through ELP1 or ELP3. Strikingly, DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6-depleted melanoma cells have similar defects, further supporting the idea that DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 are essential for Elongator function. Together, our data identify DERP6/ELP5 and C3ORF75/ELP6 as key players for migration, invasion and tumorigenicity of melanoma cells, as integral subunits of Elongator.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22854966
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 20
      15. Serial :
        10530
      1. Author :
        Noberini, R.; Rubio de la Torre, E.; Pasquale, E. B.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cell Adh Migr
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        PC-3M-luc-C6, PC-3M-luc, IVIS, Bioware, Prostate cancer, Bioluminescence, Animals; Chromatography, Liquid; Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay; Ephrins/genetics/*metabolism; Humans; Mass Spectrometry/*methods; Mice; Receptor, EphA1/genetics/*metabolism
      12. Abstract :
        The Eph receptor tyrosine kinase family includes many members, which are often expressed together in various combinations and can promiscuously interact with multiple ephrin ligands, generating intricate networks of intracellular signals that control physiological and pathological processes. Knowing the entire repertoire of Eph receptors and ephrins expressed in a biological sample is important when studying their biological roles. Moreover, given the correlation between Eph receptor/ephrin expression and cancer pathogenesis, their expression patterns could serve important diagnostic and prognostic purposes. However, profiling Eph receptor and ephrin expression has been challenging. Here we describe a novel and straightforward approach to catalog the Eph receptors present in cultured cells and tissues. By measuring the binding of ephrin Fc fusion proteins to Eph receptors in ELISA and pull-down assays, we determined that a mixture of four ephrins is suitable for isolating both EphA and EphB receptors in a single pull-down. We then used mass spectrometry to identify the Eph receptors present in the pull-downs and estimate their relative levels. This approach was validated in cultured human cancer cell lines, human tumor xenograft tissue grown in mice, and mouse brain tissue. The new mass spectrometry approach we have developed represents a useful tool for the identification of the spectrum of Eph receptors present in a biological sample and could also be extended to profiling ephrin expression.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22568954
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10538
      1. Author :
        Danussi, C.; Petrucco, A.; Wassermann, B.; Modica, T. M.; Pivetta, E.; Del Bel Belluz, L.; Colombatti, A.; Spessotto, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        The evidence that EMILIN1 (Elastic Microfibril Interface Located proteIN) deficiency in Emilin1(-/-) mice caused dermal and epidermal hyperproliferation and an abnormal lymphatic phenotype prompted us to hypothesize the involvement of this extracellular matrix component in tumor development and in lymphatic metastasis. Using the 12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (DMBA/TPA) two-stage model of skin carcinogenesis, we found that Emilin1(-/-) mice presented an accelerated formation, a higher incidence, and the development of a larger number of tumors compared with their wild-type littermates. EMILIN1-negative tumors showed more Ki67-positive proliferating cells and higher levels of pErk1/2. In these tumors, PTEN expression was lower. Emilin1(-/-) mice displayed enhanced lymphangiogenesis both in the tumor and in the sentinel lymph nodes. Accordingly, tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of transplanted syngenic tumors were also increased in Emilin1(-/-) mice. In vitro transmigration assays through lymphatic endothelial cells showed that EMILIN1 deficiency greatly facilitated tumor cell trafficking. Overall, these data established that EMILIN1 exerts a protective role in tumor growth, in tumor lymphatic vessel formation, as well as in metastatic spread to lymph nodes and reinforced the importance of its presence in the microenvironment to determine the tumor phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22827975
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10483
      1. Author :
        Kosaka, Nobuyoshi; Iguchi, Haruhisa; Yoshioka, Yusuke; Takeshita, Fumitaka; Matsuki, Yasushi; Ochiya, Takahiro
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        The Journal of biological chemistry
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        285
      8. Issue :
        23
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Aniline Compounds; Animals; Benzylidene Compounds; Biological Transport; Bioware; Cercopithecus aethiops; COS Cells; Culture Media, Conditioned; Exosomes; Gene Silencing; Humans; MicroRNAs; Neoplasms; PC-3M-luc; RNA Interference; RNA, Small Interfering; Sphingomyelin Phosphodiesterase; Tumor Markers, Biological
      12. Abstract :
        The existence of circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) in the blood of cancer patients has raised the possibility that miRNAs may serve as a novel diagnostic marker. However, the secretory mechanism and biological function of extracellular miRNAs remain unclear. Here, we show that miRNAs are released through a ceramide-dependent secretory machinery and that the secretory miRNAs are transferable and functional in the recipient cells. Ceramide, whose biosynthesis is regulated by neutral sphingomyelinase 2 (nSMase2), triggers secretion of small membrane vesicles called exosomes. The decreased activity of nSMase2 with a chemical inhibitor, GW4869, and a specific small interfering RNA resulted in the reduced secretion of miRNAs. Complementarily, overexpression of nSMase2 increased extracellular amounts of miRNAs. We also revealed that the endosomal sorting complex required for transport system is unnecessary for the release of miRNAs. Furthermore, a tumor-suppressive miRNA secreted via this pathway was transported between cells and exerted gene silencing in the recipient cells, thereby leading to cell growth inhibition. Our findings shed a ray of light on the physiological relevance of secretory miRNAs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20353945
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8946