1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

171–180 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Tremoleda, J. L.; Khalil, M.; Gompels, L. L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, M.; Vincent, T.; Gsell, W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        EJNMMI Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22214535
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10477
      1. Author :
        Pribaz, J. R.; Bernthal, N. M.; Billi, F.; Cho, J. S.; Ramos, R. I.; Guo, Y.; Cheung, A. L.; Francis, K. P.; Miller, L. S.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Journal of orthopaedic research : official publication of the Orthopaedic Research Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        N/A
      12. Abstract :
        Post-arthroplasty infections are a devastating problem in orthopaedic surgery. While acute infections can be treated with a single stage washout and liner exchange, chronic infections lead to multiple reoperations, prolonged antibiotic courses, extended disability, and worse clinical outcomes. Unlike previous mouse models that studied an acute infection, this work aimed to develop a model of a chronic post-arthroplasty infection. To achieve this, a stainless steel implant in the knee joints of mice was inoculated with a bioluminescent Staphylococcus aureus strain (1 x 10(2) -1 x 10(4) colony forming units, CFUs) and in vivo imaging was used to monitor the bacterial burden for 42 days. Four different S. aureus strains were compared in which the bioluminescent construct was integrated in an antibiotic selection plasmid (ALC2906), the bacterial chromosome (Xen29 and Xen40), or a stable plasmid (Xen36). ALC2906 had increased bioluminescent signals through day 10, after which the signals became undetectable. In contrast, Xen29, Xen40, and Xen36 had increased bioluminescent signals through 42 days with the highest signals observed with Xen36. ALC2906, Xen29, and Xen40 induced significantly more inflammation than Xen36 as measured by in vivo enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-neutrophil flourescence of LysEGFP mice. All four strains induced comparable biofilm formation as determined by variable-pressure scanning electron microscopy. Using a titanium implant, Xen36 had higher in vivo bioluminescence signals than Xen40 but had similar biofilm formation and adherent bacteria. In conclusion, Xen29, Xen40, and especially Xen36, which had stable bioluminescent constructs, are feasible for long-term in vivo monitoring of bacterial burden and biofilm formation to study chronic post-arthroplasty infections and potential antimicrobial interventions. (c) 2011 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21837686
      14. Call Number :
        142237
      15. Serial :
        6983
      1. Author :
        Cabral, Horacio; Nishiyama, Nobuhiro; Kataoka, Kazunori
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Journal of controlled release: official journal of the Controlled Release Society
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        121
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Carriers; Drug Delivery Systems; Female; Hela Cells; HeLa-luc; Humans; Mice; Mice, SCID; Micelles; Neoplasms; Organoplatinum Compounds; Platinum; Polymers; Xenograft Model Antitumor Assays
      12. Abstract :
        Polymeric micelles are promising nanocarriers, which might enhance the efficacy of antitumor drugs. Herein, polymeric micelles incorporating dichloro(1,2-diamino-cyclohexane)platinum(II) (DACHPt), the oxaliplatin parent complex, were prepared through the polymer-metal complex formation of DACHPt with poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(glutamic acid) [PEG-b-P(Glu)] block copolymer having different lengths of the poly(glutamic acid) block [p(Glu): 20, 40, and 70 U]. The resulting micelles were studied with the aim of optimizing the system's biological performance. DACHPt-loaded micelles (DACHPt/m) were approximately 40 nm in diameter and had a narrow size distribution. In vivo biodistribution and antitumor activity experiments (CDF1 mice bearing the murine colon adenocarcinoma C-26 inoculated subcutaneously) showed 20-fold greater accumulation of DACHPt/m at the tumor site than free oxaliplatin to achieve substantially higher antitumor efficacy. Moreover, the micelles prepared from PEG-b-P(Glu) with 20 U of P(Glu) exhibited the lowest non-specific accumulation in the liver and spleen to critically reduce non-specific accumulation, resulting in higher specificity to solid tumors. The antitumor effect of DACHPt/m was also evaluated on multiple metastases generated from intraperitoneally injected bioluminescent HeLa (HeLa-Luc) cells. The in vivo bioluminescent data indicated that DACHPt/m decreased the signal 10-to 50-fold compared to the control indicating a very strong antitumor activity. These results suggest that DACHPt/m could be an outstanding drug delivery system for oxaliplatin in the treatment of solid tumors.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17628162
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9007
      1. Author :
        N/A
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Acta biomaterialia
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        6
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bacterial Adhesion; Biocompatible Materials; Biofilms; Bioware; Coated Materials, Biocompatible; Materials Testing; Polyethylene Glycols; Staphylococcus aureus; Staphylococcus epidermidis; Surface Properties; Xen29
      12. Abstract :
        Poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) coatings are known to reduce microbial adhesion in terms of numbers and binding strength. However, bacterial adhesion remains of the order of 10(4)cm(-2). It is unknown whether this density of bacteria will eventually grow into a biofilm. This study investigates the kinetics of staphylococcal biofilm formation on a commercially produced, robust, cross-linked PEG-based polymer coating (OptiChem) in vitro and in vivo. OptiChem inhibits biofilm formation in vitro, and although adsorption of plasma proteins encourages biofilm formation, microbial growth kinetics are still strongly delayed compared to uncoated glass. In vivo, OptiChem-coated and bare silicone rubber samples were inserted into an infected murine subcutaneous pocket model. In contrast to bare silicone rubber, OptiChem samples did not become colonized upon reimplantation despite the fact that surrounding tissues were always culture-positive. We conclude that the commercial OptiChem coating considerably slows down bacterial biofilm formation both in vitro and in vivo, making it an attractive candidate for biomaterials implant coating.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19733265
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9041
      1. Author :
        Srivastava, Amit; Henneke, Philipp; Visintin, Alberto; Morse, Sarah C; Martin, Victoria; Watkins, Claire; Paton, James C; Wessels, Michael R; Golenbock, Douglas T; Malley, Richard
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        Infection and immunity
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        73
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        6479-6487
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Amino Acid Chloromethyl Ketones; Animals; Apoptosis; Bacterial Proteins; Caspases; Lipopolysaccharides; Macrophages; Mice; Mice, Inbred Strains; Nasopharynx; Pneumococcal Infections; Streptococcus pneumoniae; Streptolysins; Xen10
      12. Abstract :
        Pneumolysin, the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin of Streptococcus pneumoniae, induces inflammatory and apoptotic events in mammalian cells. Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) confers resistance to pneumococcal infection via its interaction with pneumolysin, but the underlying mechanisms remain to be identified. In the present study, we found that pneumolysin-induced apoptosis is also mediated by TLR4 and confers protection against invasive disease. The interaction between TLR4 and pneumolysin is direct and specific; ligand-binding studies demonstrated that pneumolysin binds to TLR4 but not to TLR2. Involvement of TLR4 in pneumolysin-induced apoptosis was demonstrated in several complementary experiments. First, macrophages from wild-type mice were significantly more prone to pneumolysin-induced apoptosis than cells from TLR4-defective mice. In gain-of-function experiments, we found that epithelial cells expressing TLR4 and stimulated with pneumolysin were more likely to undergo apoptosis than cells expressing TLR2. A specific TLR4 antagonist, B1287, reduced pneumolysin-mediated apoptosis in wild-type cells. This apoptotic response was also partially caspase dependent as preincubation of cells with the pan-caspase inhibitor zVAD-fmk reduced pneumolysin-induced apoptosis. Finally, in a mouse model of pneumococcal infection, pneumolysin-producing pneumococci elicited significantly more upper respiratory tract cell apoptosis in wild-type mice than in TLR4-defective mice, and blocking apoptosis by administration of zVAD-fmk to wild-type mice resulted in a significant increase in mortality following nasopharyngeal pneumococcal exposure. Overall, our results strongly suggest that protection against pneumococcal disease is dependent on the TLR4-mediated enhancement of pneumolysin-induced apoptosis.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/16177320
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        10001
      1. Author :
        O'Connor, A. E.; Mc Gee, M. M.; Likar, Y.; Ponomarev, V.; Callanan, J. J.; O'Shea D, F.; Byrne, A. T.; Gallagher, W. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Int J Cancer
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H1, MDA-MB-231-luc-D3H1, IVIS, Bioware, Breast Cancer
      12. Abstract :
        Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is an established treatment modality for cancer. ADPM06 is an emerging non-porphyrin PDT agent which has been specifically designed for therapeutic application. Recently, we have demonstrated that ADPM06-PDT is well tolerated in vivo and elicits impressive complete response rates in various models of cancer when a short drug-light interval is applied. Herein, the mechanism of action of ADPM06-PDT in vitro and in vivo is outlined. Using a drug and light combination that reduces the clonogenicity of MDA-MB-231 cells by >90%, we detected a well-orchestrated apoptotic response accompanied by the activation of various caspases in vitro. The generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) upon photosensitizer irradiation was found to be the key instigator in the observed apoptotic response, with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) found to be the intracellular site of initial PDT damage, as determined by induction of a rapid ER stress response post-PDT. PDT-induced apoptosis was also found to be independent of p53 tumor suppressor status. A robust therapeutic response in vivo was demonstrated, with a substantial reduction in tumor proliferation observed, as well as a rapid induction of apoptosis and initiation of ER stress, mirroring numerous aspects of the mechanism of action of ADPM06 in vitro. Finally, using a combination of (18) F-labeled 3'-deoxy-3'-fluorothymidine ((18) F-FLT) nuclear and optical imaging, a considerable decrease in tumor proliferation over 24-hr in two models of human cancer was observed. Taken together, this data clearly establishes ADPM06 as an exciting novel PDT agent with significant potential for further translational development.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21413012
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10516
      1. Author :
        Nguyen, Leslie; Zhong, Wei-Zhu; Painter, Cory L; Zhang, Cathy; Rahavendran, Sadayappan V; Shen, Zhongzhou
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Journal of pharmaceutical and biomedical analysis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        53
      8. Issue :
        3
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Bioware; Chromatography, Liquid; Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 4; Drug Stability; Female; Humans; MDA-MB-231-D3H1 cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; Neoplasm Transplantation; Neoplasms, Experimental; Piperazines; Protein kinase inhibitors; Pyridines; Sensitivity and Specificity; Tandem Mass Spectrometry; Transplantation, Heterologous
      12. Abstract :
        Phase II attrition of clinical candidates in the drug development cycle is currently a major issue facing the pharmaceutical industry. To decrease phase II attrition, there is an increased emphasis on validation of mechanism of action, development of efficacy models and measurement of drug levels at the site of action. PD 0332991, a highly specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK-4) is currently in clinical development for the treatment of solid tumor. A clinical presurgical study will be required to better understand how PD 0332991 affects signaling pathways and how the intratumoral concentration of PD 0332991 correlates with plasma PK parameters and molecular alterations in breast cancer tissues after PD 0332991 treatment. Before conducting such a clinical study, it is important to evaluate PD 0332991 levels in tumor tissue samples from a xenograft mouse model for the determination of drug exposure at the site of action. Therefore, the objectives of this study were (1) to develop and validate a sensitive LC-MS/MS method to quantify PD 0332991 in mouse tumor tissues from MDA-MB-231-Luc human breast tumor xenografts in SCID-beige mice; (2) to quantify PD 0332991 levels in mouse tumor tissues after oral administration of PD 0332991 at 10 and 100mg/kg using the validated LC-MS/MS method. Both liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) and supported liquid extraction (SLE) in a 96-well format were developed and evaluated to achieve optimal extraction recovery with minimal matrix effects. The newly developed SLE method is more efficient (speed and ease) and demonstrates comparable recovery (93.1-100% at three different concentrations) compared to the traditional LLE method. The validated LC-MS/MS for PD 032291 in mouse tumor tissue homogenate method exhibited a linear dynamic range of 0.1-100 ng/mL with inter-day accuracy and precision within 15%. The validated method was successfully applied to measure PD 0332991 levels in tumor tissues in MDA-MB-231-Luc human breast tumor xenografts in SCID beige mice. The mean tumor concentrations at 6h post-oral PD 0332991 administration at 10 and 100mg/kg were 1793 (+/-1008) and 25,163 (+/-3959) ng/g, respectively.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20236782
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8987
      1. Author :
        Ranganath, Sudhir H; Fu, Yilong; Arifin, Davis Y; Kee, Irene; Zheng, Lin; Lee, How-Sung; Chow, Pierce K-H; Wang, Chi-Hwa
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Biomaterials
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        31
      8. Issue :
        19
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Bioware; Brain Neoplasms; Cell Line, Tumor; Drug Implants; Glioblastoma; Male; Metabolic Clearance Rate; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Nanostructures; Paclitaxel; Treatment Outcome; U-87 MG-luc2
      12. Abstract :
        Pharmacokinetics and therapeutic efficacy of submicron/nanoscale, intracranial implants were evaluated for treating malignant glioblastoma in mice. 9.1% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded polylactide-co-glycolide (PLGA) nanofiber discs (F3) were fabricated and characterized for morphology and size distribution. Along with F3, three other formulations, 9.1% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded PLGA submicron-fiber discs (F2), 16.7% (w/w) paclitaxel-loaded PLGA microspheres entrapped in hydrogel matrices (H80 and M80) were intracranially implanted in BALB/c mice and the coronal brain sections were analyzed for bio-distribution of paclitaxel on 14, 28 and 42 days post-implantation. BALB/c nude mice with intracranial human glioblastoma (U87 MG-luc2) were used in the therapeutic efficacy study. Animals were randomized to intracranial implantation of F3 and H80 with paclitaxel dose of 10mg/kg, placebo F3, placebo H80, weekly intratumoral injection of Taxol (10mg/kg) or no treatment and the treatment response was analyzed by bioluminescence imaging and histological (H&E, Ki-67) examinations. Enhanced, therapeutic paclitaxel penetration (approximately 1 microm) in the mouse brain up to 5mm from the implant site even after 42 days post-implantation from F3 and H80 was confirmed and deduced to be diffusion/elimination controlled. F3 and H80 demonstrated significant (approximately 30 fold) tumor inhibition and significantly low tumor proliferation index after 41 days of treatment in comparison to sham and placebo controls. The submicron/nanoscale implants are able to demonstrate optimal paclitaxel pharmacokinetics in the brain/tumor with significant tumor inhibition in a glioblastoma xenograft model in mice and hence could be potentially useful to treat highly recurrent GBM.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20350766
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8942
      1. Author :
        Hunter, John J.; Neben, Tamlyn Yee; Purchio, Tony; Jenkins, Darlene
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2005
      5. Publication :
        AACR Meeting Abstracts
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        2005
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Bioware; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells
      12. Abstract :
        Peritoneal dissemination is a common feature of human ovarian carcinoma. While this can be mimicked in preclinical models by intraperitoneal injection of human ovarian tumor cells into immunocompromised mice, the resulting tumor burden is difficult to monitor and quantify. Intraperitoneal tumor growth is typically evaluated indirectly by measured changes in mouse abdominal girth and body weight or, directly, by macroscopic and histological examination at the endpoint of the study. In order to establish a model system that allows continuous and accurate assessment of ovarian cancer growth and spread over time we transfected SKOV-3 cells with the firefly luciferase gene. The resulting cell line, SKOV3-luc-D3, expresses stable levels of luciferase in vitro and emits a strong luminescent signal when exposed to luciferin. Xenograft tumors established with this cell line can be tracked and quantified non-invasively by bioluminescent imaging using a highly sensitive, cooled CCD camera (IVIS(R) Imaging System, Xenogen Corp). In addition to providing a direct measure of primary tumor burden and growth, the SKOV3-luc-D3 cell line also allows for real-time evaluation of tumor response to various therapeutic agents, as well as enhanced detection of distal metastases.
      13. URL :
        http://www.aacrmeetingabstracts.org/cgi/content/abstract/2005/1/256-b
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        9014
      1. Author :
        Wunder A and Klohs J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Basic Research in Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        103
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; atherosclerosis; bioluminescence imaging; fluorescence imaging; myocardial infarction; stroke; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Pathophysiological processes in the vascular system are the major cause of mortality and disease. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke. Imaging techniques enabling visualization of the biological processes involved in this scenario are therefore highly desirable. In recent years, a number of reporter agents and reporter systems have been developed to visualize these processes using different imaging modalities including nuclear imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. This article comprises a brief overview of optical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and bioluminescence imaging for the visualization of vascular pathophysiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324374
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4649
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All