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      1. Author :
        Tremoleda, J. L.; Khalil, M.; Gompels, L. L.; Wylezinska-Arridge, M.; Vincent, T.; Gsell, W.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        EJNMMI Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        1
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense
      12. Abstract :
        Preclinical models for musculoskeletal disorders are critical for understanding the pathogenesis of bone and joint disorders in humans and the development of effective therapies. The assessment of these models primarily relies on morphological analysis which remains time consuming and costly, requiring large numbers of animals to be tested through different stages of the disease. The implementation of preclinical imaging represents a keystone in the refinement of animal models allowing longitudinal studies and enabling a powerful, non-invasive and clinically translatable way for monitoring disease progression in real time. Our aim is to highlight examples that demonstrate the advantages and limitations of different imaging modalities including magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), computed tomography (CT), positron emission tomography (PET), single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and optical imaging. All of which are in current use in preclinical skeletal research. MRI can provide high resolution of soft tissue structures, but imaging requires comparatively long acquisition times; hence, animals require long-term anaesthesia. CT is extensively used in bone and joint disorders providing excellent spatial resolution and good contrast for bone imaging. Despite its excellent structural assessment of mineralized structures, CT does not provide in vivo functional information of ongoing biological processes. Nuclear medicine is a very promising tool for investigating functional and molecular processes in vivo with new tracers becoming available as biomarkers. The combined use of imaging modalities also holds significant potential for the assessment of disease pathogenesis in animal models of musculoskeletal disorders, minimising the use of conventional invasive methods and animal redundancy.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22214535
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 15
      15. Serial :
        10477
      1. Author :
        van der Horst, G.; van der Pluijm, G.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Future Oncol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*diagnosis/*secondary; Diagnostic Imaging/*methods; Disease Models, Animal; Disease Progression; Humans; Molecular Imaging/methods; Neoplasm Metastasis/diagnosis
      12. Abstract :
        Bone metastasis is a complex process that ultimately leads to devastating metastatic bone disease. It is therefore of key interest to unravel the mechanisms underlying the multistep process of skeletal metastasis and cancer-induced bone disease, and to develop better treatment and management of patients with this devastating disease. Fortunately, novel technologies are rapidly emerging that allow real-time imaging of molecules, pathogenic processes, drug delivery and drug response in preclinical in vivo models. The outcome of these experimental studies will facilitate clinical cancer research by improving the detection of cancer cell invasion, metastasis and therapy response.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22515445
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 16
      15. Serial :
        10478
      1. Author :
        Chen, Y.; Jacamo, R.; Shi, Y. X.; Wang, R. Y.; Battula, V. L.; Konoplev, S.; Strunk, D.; Hofmann, N. A.; Reinisch, A.; Konopleva, M.; Andreeff, M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Blood
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        119
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS, Animals; Bone Marrow Cells/*cytology/metabolism/physiology; Bone Marrow Transplantation/*methods/physiology; Cells, Cultured; Cellular Microenvironment/genetics/*physiology; Hematopoiesis, Extramedullary/genetics/*physiology; Humans; Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1, alpha Subunit/genetics/metabolism; Interleukin Receptor Common gamma Subunit/genetics; Mice; Mice, Inbred NOD; Mice, SCID; Mice, Transgenic; Models, Animal; Osteogenesis/genetics/physiology; Species Specificity; *Transplantation, Heterotopic
      12. Abstract :
        The interactions between hematopoietic cells and the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment play a critical role in normal and malignant hematopoiesis and drug resistance. These interactions within the BM niche are unique and could be important for developing new therapies. Here, we describe the development of extramedullary bone and bone marrow using human mesenchymal stromal cells and endothelial colony-forming cells implanted subcutaneously into immunodeficient mice. We demonstrate the engraftment of human normal and leukemic cells engraft into the human extramedullary bone marrow. When normal hematopoietic cells are engrafted into the model, only discrete areas of the BM are hypoxic, whereas leukemia engraftment results in widespread severe hypoxia, just as recently reported by us in human leukemias. Importantly, the hematopoietic cell engraftment could be altered by genetical manipulation of the bone marrow microenvironment: Extramedullary bone marrow in which hypoxia-inducible factor 1alpha was knocked down in mesenchymal stromal cells by lentiviral transfer of short hairpin RNA showed significant reduction (50% +/- 6%; P = .0006) in human leukemic cell engraftment. These results highlight the potential of a novel in vivo model of human BM microenvironment that can be genetically modified. The model could be useful for the study of leukemia biology and for the development of novel therapeutic modalities aimed at modifying the hematopoietic microenvironment.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22490334
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 2
      15. Serial :
        10465
      1. Author :
        Kozloff, K. M.; Quinti, L.; Patntirapong, S.; Hauschka, P. V.; Tung, C. H.; Weissleder, R.; Mahmood, U.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Bone
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        44
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        OsteoSense, IVIS Animals; Animals, Newborn; Bone Development; Bone Resorption/enzymology; Calcification, Physiologic; Cathepsin K; Cathepsins/genetics/*metabolism; Cell Survival; Cells, Cultured; Cryoultramicrotomy; Female; Femur/pathology; Fluorescence; Humans; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; *Molecular Probe Techniques; Molecular Probes/metabolism; Osteoclasts/cytology/*enzymology; Ovariectomy; RNA, Messenger/genetics/metabolism; Up-Regulation
      12. Abstract :
        Osteoclasts degrade bone matrix by demineralization followed by degradation of type I collagen through secretion of the cysteine protease, cathepsin K. Current imaging modalities are insufficient for sensitive observation of osteoclast activity, and in vivo live imaging of osteoclast resorption of bone has yet to be demonstrated. Here, we describe a near-infrared fluorescence reporter probe whose activation by cathepsin K is shown in live osteoclast cells and in mouse models of development and osteoclast upregulation. Cathepsin K probe activity was monitored in live osteoclast cultures and correlates with cathepsin K gene expression. In ovariectomized mice, cathepsin K probe upregulation precedes detection of bone loss by micro-computed tomography. These results are the first to demonstrate non-invasive visualization of bone degrading enzymes in models of accelerated bone loss, and may provide a means for early diagnosis of upregulated resorption and rapid feedback on efficacy of treatment protocols prior to significant loss of bone in the patient.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/19007918
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10466
      1. Author :
        Matthias Nahrendorf, Peter Waterman, Greg Thurber, Kevin Groves, Milind Rajopadhye, Peter Panizzi, Brett Marinelli, Elena Aikawa, Mikael J Pittet, Filip K Swirski and Ralph Weissleder
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        29
      8. Issue :
        10
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        FMT-CT; molecular imaging; atherosclerosis; protease activity; inflammation; in vivo imaging; fluorescence molecular tomography; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Objective: Proteases are emerging biomarkers of inflammatory diseases. In atherosclerosis, these enzymes are often secreted by inflammatory macrophages, digest the extracellular matrix of the fibrous cap and destabilize atheromata. Protease function can be monitored with protease activatable imaging probes and quantitated in vivo by fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT). To address two major constraints currently associated with imaging of murine atherosclerosis (lack of highly sensitive probes and absence of anatomical information), we compared protease sensors (PS) of variable size and pharmacokinetics and co-registered FMT datasets with computed tomography (FMT-CT).

        Methods and results: Co-registration of FMT and CT was achieved with a multimodal imaging cartridge containing fiducial markers detectable by both modalities. A high-resolution CT angiography protocol accurately localized fluorescence to the aortic root of atherosclerotic apoE-/- mice. To identify suitable sensors, we first modeled signal kinetics in-silico and then compared three probes with identical oligo-L-lysine cleavage sequences: PS-5, 5nm in diameter containing 2 fluorochromes , PS-25, a 25nm version with an elongated lysine chain and PS-40, a polymeric nanoparticle. Serial FMT-CT showed fastest kinetics for PS-5 but, surprisingly, highest fluorescence in lesions of the aortic root for PS-40. PS-40 robustly reported therapeutic effects of atorvastatin, corroborated by ex vivo imaging and qPCR for the model protease cathepsin B.

        Conclusions: FMT-CT is a robust and observer-independent tool for non-invasive assessment of inflammatory murine atherosclerosis. Reporter-containing nanomaterials may have unique advantages over small molecule agents for in vivo imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2746251/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4568
      1. Author :
        E.A. te Velde; Th. Veerman; V. Subramaniam; Th. Ruers
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        European Journal of Cancer Surgery
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        36
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cancer
      11. Keywords :
        Fluorescent; Sentinel node; Probe; Resection; Oncology; Surgery
      12. Abstract :
        Aims and background: Improved visualization of surgical targets inside of the patient helps to improve radical resection of the tumor while sparing healthy surrounding tissue. In order to achieve an image, optical contrast must be generated by properties intrinsic to the tissue, or require the attachment of special visualization labels to the tumor. In this overview the current status of the clinical use of fluorescent dyes and probes are reviewed.

        Methods: In this review, all experimental and clinical studies concerning fluorescent imaging were included. In addition, in the search for the optimal fluorescent imaging modality, all characteristics of a fluorescent dye were described.

        Findings and conclusions: Although the technique of imaging through fluorescence sounds promising and several animal models show efficacy, official approval of these agents for further clinical evaluation, is eagerly awaited.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ejso.com/article/S0748-7983%2809%2900498-3/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4491
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