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      1. Author :
        Elena S. Izmailova; Nancy Paz; Herlen Alencar; Miyoung Chun; Lisa Schopf; Michael Hepperle; Joan H. Lane; Geraldine Harriman; Yajun Xu; Timothy Ocain; Ralph Weissleder; Umar Mahmood; Aileen M. Healy; Bruce Jaffee
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2007
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        56
      8. Issue :
        1
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        inflammation; immune response; rheumatoid arthritis; arthritis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: The NF-kappaB signaling pathway promotes the immune response in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and in rodent models of RA. NF-kappaB activity is regulated by the IKK-2 kinase during inflammatory responses. To elucidate how IKK-2 inhibition suppresses disease development, we used a combination of in vivo imaging, transcription profiling, and histopathology technologies to study mice with antibody-induced arthritis.

        METHODS: ML120B, a potent, small molecule inhibitor of IKK-2, was administered to arthritic animals, and disease activity was monitored. NF-kappaB activity in diseased joints was quantified by in vivo imaging. Quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was used to evaluate gene expression in joints. Protease-activated near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) in vivo imaging was applied to assess the amounts of active proteases in the joints.

        RESULTS: Oral administration of ML120B suppressed both clinical and histopathologic manifestations of disease. In vivo imaging demonstrated that NF-kappaB activity in inflamed arthritic paws was inhibited by ML120B, resulting in significant suppression of multiple genes in the NF-kappaB pathway, i.e., KC, epithelial neutrophil-activating peptide 78, JE, intercellular adhesion molecule 1, CD3, CD68, tumor necrosis factor alpha, interleukin-1beta, interleukin-6, inducible nitric oxide synthase, cyclooxygenase 2, matrix metalloproteinase 3, cathepsin B, and cathepsin K. NIRF in vivo imaging demonstrated that ML120B treatment dramatically reduced the amount of active proteases in the joints.

        CONCLUSION: Our data demonstrate that IKK-2 inhibition in the murine model of antibody-induced arthritis suppresses both inflammation and joint destruction. In addition, this study highlights how gene expression profiling can facilitate the identification of surrogate biomarkers of disease activity and treatment response in an experimental model of arthritis.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.22303/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4511
      1. Author :
        Rosenzweig HL, Jann MM, Glant TT, Martin TM, Planck SR, van Eden W, van Kooten PJ, Flavell RA, Kobayashi KS, Rosenbaum JT and Davey MP
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Journal of Leukocyte Biology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        85
      8. Issue :
        4
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging; NOD2; mice; inflammatory arthritis; TCR transgenic; knockout
      12. Abstract :
        In addition to its role in innate immunity, nucleotide oligomerization domain 2 (NOD2) has been shown to play a suppressive role in models of colitis. Notably, mutations in NOD2 cause the inherited granulomatous disease of the joints called Blau syndrome, thereby linking NOD2 with joint disease as well. However, the role of NOD2 in joint inflammation has not been clarified. We demonstrate here that NOD2 is functional within the mouse joint and promotes inflammation, as locally or systemically administered muramyl dipeptide (MDP; the NOD2 agonist) resulted in significant joint inflammation that was abolished in NOD2-deficient mice. We then sought to investigate the role of NOD2 in a mouse model of inflammatory arthritis dependent on adaptive immunity using TCR-transgenic mice whose T cells recognized the dominant epitope of proteoglycan (PG). Mice immunized with PG in the presence of MDP developed a more severe inflammatory arthritis and histopathology within the joints. Antigen-specific activation of splenocytes was enhanced by MDP with respect to IFN-gamma production, which would be consistent with the Th1-mediated disease in vivo. Intriguingly, NOD2 deficiency did not alter the PG-induced arthritis, indicating that NOD2 does not play an essential role in this model of joint disease when it is not activated by MDP. In conclusion, we demonstrate that in a model of inflammatory arthritis dependent on T and B cell priming, NOD2 activation potentiates disease. However, the absence of NOD2 does not alter the course of inflammatory arthritis, in contrast to models of intestinal inflammation.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2718807/?tool=pubmed
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4535
      1. Author :
        Kim DE, Kim JY, Schellingerhout D, Shon SM, Jeong SW, Kim EJ and Kim WK
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Molecular Imaging
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        8
      8. Issue :
        5
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        Inflammation in atherosclerotic plaques causes plaque vulnerability and rupture, leading to thromboembolic complications. Cathepsin B (CatB) proteases secreted by macrophages play a major role in plaque inflammation. We used a CatB-activatable near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging agent to demonstrate the inflammatory component in mice atheromata and the atherosclerosis- modulating effects of atorvastatin or glucosamine treatments. Apolipoprotein E knockout mice (n = 35) were fed normal chow, a Western diet, a Western diet + atorvastatin, a Western diet + glucosamine, or a Western diet + atorvastatin + glucosamine for 14 weeks. Twenty-four hours after the intravenous injection of a CatB-activatable probe, ex vivo NIRF imaging of the aortas and brains was performed, followed by histology. The CatB-related signal, observed in the aortas but not in the cerebral arteries, correlated very well with protease activity and the presence of macrophages on histology. Animals on Western diets could be distinguished from animals on a normal diet. The antiatherosclerotic effects of atorvastatin and glucosamine could be demonstrated, with reduced CatB-related signal compared with untreated animals. Plaque populations were heterogeneous within individuals, with some plaques showing a high and others a lower CatB-related signal. These differences in signal intensity could not be predicted by visual inspection of the plaques but did correlate with histologic evidence of inflammation in every case. This suggests that vulnerable inflamed plaques can be identified by optical molecular imaging.
      13. URL :
        http://www.bcdecker.com/pubMedLinkOut.aspx?pub=MIO&vol=8&iss=5&page=291
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4558
      1. Author :
        Wunder A and Klohs J.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2008
      5. Publication :
        Basic Research in Cardiology
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        103
      8. Issue :
        2
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Cardiovascular Research
      11. Keywords :
        In vivo imaging; atherosclerosis; bioluminescence imaging; fluorescence imaging; myocardial infarction; stroke; ProSense
      12. Abstract :
        Pathophysiological processes in the vascular system are the major cause of mortality and disease. Atherosclerosis, an inflammatory process in arterial walls, can lead to formation of plaques, whose rupture can lead to thrombus formation, obstruction of vessels (thrombosis), reduction of the blood flow (ischemia), cell death in the tissue fed by the occluded vessel, and depending on the affected vessel, to myocardial infarction or stroke. Imaging techniques enabling visualization of the biological processes involved in this scenario are therefore highly desirable. In recent years, a number of reporter agents and reporter systems have been developed to visualize these processes using different imaging modalities including nuclear imaging techniques, such as positron emission tomography or single photon emission computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, and ultrasound. This article comprises a brief overview of optical imaging techniques, such as fluorescence imaging and bioluminescence imaging for the visualization of vascular pathophysiology.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18324374
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4649
      1. Author :
        Stangenberg L, Ellson C, Cortez-Retamozo V, Ortiz-Lopez A, Yuan H, Blois J, Smith RA, Yaffe MB, Weissleder R, Benoist C, Mathis D, Josephson L and Mahmood U
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2009
      5. Publication :
        Arthritis and Rheumatism
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        60
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        Physiology
      11. Keywords :
        ProSense; AngioSense; arthritis; in vivo imaging
      12. Abstract :
        OBJECTIVE: To test a novel self-activating viridin (SAV) prodrug that slowly releases wortmannin, a potent phosphoinositide 3-kinase inhibitor, in a model of antibody-mediated inflammatory arthritis.

        METHODS: The SAV prodrug was administered to K/BxN mice or to C57BL/6 (B6) mice that had been injected with K/BxN serum. Ankle thickness was measured, and histologic changes were scored after a 10-day disease course (serum-transfer arthritis). Protease activity was measured by a near-infrared imaging approach using a cleavable cathepsin-selective probe. Further near-infrared imaging techniques were used to analyze early changes in vascular permeability after serum injection, as well as neutrophil-endothelial cell interactions. Neutrophil functions were assessed using an oxidative burst assay as well as a degranulation assay.

        RESULTS: SAV prevented ankle swelling in mice with serum-transfer arthritis in a dose-dependent manner. It also markedly reduced the extent of other features of arthritis, such as protease activity and histology scores for inflammation and joint erosion. Moreover, SAV was an effective therapeutic agent. The underlying mechanisms for the antiinflammatory activity were manifold. Endothelial permeability after serum injection was reduced, as was firm neutrophil attachment to endothelial cells. Endothelial cell activation by tumor necrosis factor alpha was impeded by SAV, as measured by the expression of vascular cell adhesion molecule. Crucial neutrophil functions, such as generation of reactive oxygen species and degranulation of protease-laden vesicles, were decreased by SAV administration.

        CONCLUSION: A novel SAV prodrug proved strongly antiinflammatory in a murine model of antibody-induced inflammatory arthritis. Its activity could be attributed, at least in part, to the inhibition of neutrophil and endothelial cell functions.
      13. URL :
        http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1002/art.24704/abstract
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ sarah.piper @
      15. Serial :
        4528