1. Resources
  2. Citations Library

Citation Details

You are viewing citation details. You can save or export citation(s) below, access an article, or start a new search.

281–290 of 499 records found matching your query:
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All

Headers act as filters

      1. Author :
        Hickson, J; Ackler, S; Klaubert, D; Bouska, J; Ellis, P; Foster, K; Oleksijew, A; Rodriguez, L; Schlessinger, S; Wang, B; Frost, D
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        Cell death and differentiation
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        17
      8. Issue :
        6
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        Animals; Antineoplastic Agents; Apoptosis; Bioware; Caspase 3; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Firefly Luciferin; Humans; Luminescent Agents; MDA-MB-231-D3H2LN cells; Mice; Mice, SCID; SKOV3-luc-D3 cells; Molecular Imaging; Neoplasms; Oligopeptides; Taxoids
      12. Abstract :
        Apoptosis is a highly regulated process of programmed cell death essential for normal physiology. Dysregulation of apoptosis contributes to the development and progression of various diseases, including cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, and chronic heart failure. Quantitative noninvasive imaging of apoptosis in preclinical models would allow for dynamic longitudinal screening of compounds and facilitates a more rapid determination of therapeutic efficacy. In this study, we report the in vivo characterization of Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin, a modified firefly luciferase substrate that in apoptotic cells is cleaved by caspase-3 to liberate aminoluciferin, which can be consumed by luciferase to generate a luminescent signal. In two oncology models, namely SKOV3-luc and MDA-MB-231-luc-LN, at 24, 48, and 72 h after treatment with docetaxel, animals were injected with Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin and bioluminescent images were acquired. Significantly more light was detected at 24 (P<0.05), 48 (P<0.01), and 72 h (P<0.01) in the docetaxel-treated group compared with the vehicle-treated group, with caspase-3 activation at these time points confirmed using immunohistochemistry. Importantly, whereas significant differences between groups were detected as early as 24 h after treatment by molecular imaging, caliper measurements were unable to detect a difference for 4-5 additional days. Taken together, these data show that in vivo imaging of apoptosis using Z-DEVD-aminoluciferin could provide a sensitive and rapid method for early detection of drug efficacy, which could potentially be used by numerous therapeutic programs.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20057500
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8950
      1. Author :
        Jenkins, Darlene E; Oei, Yoko; Hornig, Yvette S; Yu, Shang-Fan; Dusich, Joan; Purchio, Tony; Contag, Pamela R
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2003
      5. Publication :
        Clinical & experimental metastasis
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        20
      8. Issue :
        8
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        A549-luc-C8; Animals; Bioware; Cell Line, Tumor; Colonic Neoplasms; Fluorouracil; HT-29-luc-D6 cells; Humans; Image Interpretation, Computer-Assisted; Longitudinal Studies; Luciferases; Luminescent Measurements; Lung Neoplasms; Lymphatic Metastasis; Male; Mice; Mice, SCID; Mitomycin; Models, Biological; Neoplasm Transplantation; PC-3M-luc; Prostatic Neoplasms
      12. Abstract :
        Bioluminescent imaging (BLI) permits sensitive in vivo detection and quantification of cells specifically engineered to emit visible light. Three stable human tumor cell lines engineered to express luciferase were assessed for their tumorigenicity in subcutaneous, intravenous and spontaneous metastasis models. Bioluminescent PC-3M-luc-C6 human prostate cancer cells were implanted subcutaneously into SCID-beige mice and were monitored for tumor growth and response to 5-FU and mitomycin C treatments. Progressive tumor development and inhibition/regression following drug treatment were observed and quantified in vivo using BLI. Imaging data correlated to standard external caliper measurements of tumor volume, but bioluminescent data permitted earlier detection of tumor growth. In a lung colonization model, bioluminescent A549-luc-C8 human lung cancer cells were injected intravenously and lung metastases were monitored in vivo by whole animal imaging. Anesthetized mice were imaged weekly allowing a temporal assessment of in vivo lung tumor growth. This longitudinal study design permitted an accurate, real-time evaluation of tumor burden in the same animals over time. End-point bioluminescence measured in vivo correlated to total lung weight at necropsy. For a spontaneous metastatic tumor model, bioluminescent HT-29-luc-D6 human colon cancer cells implanted subcutaneously produced metastases to lung and lymph nodes in SCID-beige mice. Both primary tumors and micrometastases were detected by BLI in vivo. Ex vivo imaging of excised lung lobes and lymph nodes confirmed the in vivo signals and indicated a slightly higher frequency of metastasis in some mice. Levels of bioluminescence from in vivo and ex vivo images corresponded to the frequency and size of metastatic lesions in lungs and lymph nodes as subsequently confirmed by histology. In summary, BLI provided rapid, non-invasive monitoring of tumor growth and regression in animals. Its application to traditional oncology animal models offers quantitative and sensitive analysis of tumor growth and metastasis. The ability to temporally assess tumor development and responses to drug therapies in vivo also improves upon current standard animal models that are based on single end point data.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/14713107
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ catherine.lautenschlager @
      15. Serial :
        8980
      1. Author :
        Arima, Y.; Hayashi, H.; Sasaki, M.; Hosonaga, M.; Goto, T. M.; Chiyoda, T.; Kuninaka, S.; Shibata, T.; Ohata, H.; Nakagama, H.; Taya, Y.; Saya, H.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        We previously showed that depletion of the retinoblastoma protein (RB) induces down-regulation of the adhesion molecule E-cadherin and thereby triggers the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). To further characterize the effect of RB inactivation on the phenotype of cancer cells, we have now examined RB expression in human breast cancer cell lines and clinical specimens. We found that RB-inactive cells exhibit a mesenchymal-like morphology and are highly invasive. We also found that ZEB proteins, transcriptional repressors of the E-cadherin gene, are markedly up-regulated in these cells in a manner sensitive to the miR-200 family of microRNAs. Moreover, depletion of ZEB in RB-inactive cells suppressed cell invasiveness and proliferation as well as induced epithelial marker expression. These results implicate ZEB in induction of the EMT as well as in maintenance of the mesenchymal phenotype in RB-inactive cells. We also developed a screening program for inhibitors of ZEB1 expression and thereby identified several cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitors that blocked both ZEB1 expression and RB phosphorylation. Together, our findings suggest that RB inactivation contributes to tumor progression not only through loss of cell cycle control but also through up-regulation of ZEB expression and induction of an invasive phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22262832
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 6
      15. Serial :
        10418
      1. Author :
        Chantry, A. D.; Heath, D.; Mulivor, A. W.; Pearsall, S.; Baud'huin, M.; Coulton, L.; Evans, H.; Abdul, N.; Werner, E. D.; Bouxsein, M. L.; Key, M. L.; Seehra, J.; Arnett, T. R.; Vanderkerken, K.; Croucher, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2010
      5. Publication :
        J Bone Miner Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        25
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Activins/*metabolism; Animals; Bone Neoplasms/*complications/pathology/physiopathology/secondary; Bone Resorption/*etiology/pathology/physiopathology/*prevention & control; Calcification, Physiologic/drug effects; Cell Line, Tumor; HEK293 Cells; Humans; Mice; Multiple Myeloma/complications/pathology/physiopathology; Neoplasm Transplantation; Organ Size/drug effects; Osteoblasts/drug effects/pathology; *Osteogenesis/drug effects; Osteolysis/blood/complications/physiopathology/prevention & control; Paraproteins/metabolism; Recombinant Fusion Proteins/pharmacology; *Signal Transduction/drug effects; Survival Analysis; Tumor Burden/drug effects
      12. Abstract :
        Cancers that grow in bone, such as myeloma and breast cancer metastases, cause devastating osteolytic bone destruction. These cancers hijack bone remodeling by stimulating osteoclastic bone resorption and suppressing bone formation. Currently, treatment is targeted primarily at blocking bone resorption, but this approach has achieved only limited success. Stimulating osteoblastic bone formation to promote repair is a novel alternative approach. We show that a soluble activin receptor type IIA fusion protein (ActRIIA.muFc) stimulates osteoblastogenesis (p < .01), promotes bone formation (p < .01) and increases bone mass in vivo (p < .001). We show that the development of osteolytic bone lesions in mice bearing murine myeloma cells is caused by both increased resorption (p < .05) and suppression of bone formation (p < .01). ActRIIA.muFc treatment stimulates osteoblastogenesis (p < .01), prevents myeloma-induced suppression of bone formation (p < .05), blocks the development of osteolytic bone lesions (p < .05), and increases survival (p < .05). We also show, in a murine model of breast cancer bone metastasis, that ActRIIA.muFc again prevents bone destruction (p < .001) and inhibits bone metastases (p < .05). These findings show that stimulating osteoblastic bone formation with ActRIIA.muFc blocks the formation of osteolytic bone lesions and bone metastases in models of myeloma and breast cancer and paves the way for new approaches to treating this debilitating aspect of cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20533325
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 4
      15. Serial :
        10413
      1. Author :
        Defresne, F.; Bouzin, C.; Grandjean, M.; Dieu, M.; Raes, M.; Hatzopoulos, A. K.; Kupatt, C.; Feron, O.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2011
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Res
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        MDA-MB-231-D3H2Ln, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        Tumor progression is associated with the release of signaling substances from the primary tumor into the bloodstream. Tumor-derived cytokines are known to promote the mobilization and the recruitment of cells from the bone marrow, including endothelial progenitor cells (EPC). Here, we examined whether such paracrine influence could also influence the capacity of EPC to interfere with circulating metastatic cells. We therefore consecutively injected EPC pre-stimulated by tumor conditioned medium (CM-EPC) and luciferase-expressing B16 melanoma cells to mice. A net decrease in metastases spreading (vs non-stimulated EPC) led us to carry out a 2D-DIGE proteomic study to identify possible mediators of EPC-driven protection. Among 33 proteins exhibiting significant changes in expression, SPARC presented the highest induction after EPC exposure to CM. We then showed that contrary to control EPC, SPARC-silenced EPC were not able to reduce the extent of metastases when injected with B16 melanoma cells. Using adhesion tests and the hanging drop assay, we further documented that cell-cell interactions between CM-EPC and melanoma cells were promoted in a SPARC-dependent manner. This interaction led to the engulfment of melanoma cells by CM-EPC, a process prevented by SPARC silencing and mimicked by recombinant SPARC. Finally, we showed that contrary to melanoma cells, the pro-metastatic human breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231-D3H2 reduced SPARC expression in human EPC and stimulated metastases spreading. Our findings unravel the influence of tumor cells on EPC phenotypes through a SPARC-driven accentuation of macrophagic capacity associated with limitations to metastatic spread.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21616936
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 1
      15. Serial :
        10415
      1. Author :
        Liao, A. H.; Li, Y. K.; Lee, W. J.; Wu, M. F.; Liu, H. L.; Kuo, M. L.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Ultrasound Med Biol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        38
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The application of drug-loaded microbubbles (MBs) in combination with ultrasound (US), which results in an increase in capillary permeability at the site of US-sonication-induced MB destruction, may be an efficient method of localized drug delivery. This study investigated the mechanism underlying the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs through the blood vessels to targeted cells using an in vivo bioluminescence imaging (BLI) system. The luciferin-loaded MBs comprised an albumin shell with a diameter of 1234 +/- 394 nm (mean +/- SD) and contained 2.48 x 10(9) bubbles/mL; within each MB, the concentration of encapsulated luciferin was 1.48 x 10(-)(1)(0) mg/bubble. The loading efficiency of luciferin in MBs was only about 19.8%, while maintaining both the bioluminescence and acoustic properties. In vitro and in vivo BLI experiments were performed to evaluate the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs. For in vitro results, the increase in light emission of luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs after destruction via US sonication (6.24 +/- 0.72 x 10(7) photons/s) was significantly higher than that in the luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs (3.11 +/- 0.33 x 10(7) photons/s) (p < 0.05). The efficiency of the US-mediated release of luciferin-loaded MBs in 4T1-luc2 tumor-bearing mice was also estimated. The signal intensity of the tumor with US destruction at 3 W/cm(2) for 30 s was significantly higher than without US destruction at 3 (p = 0.025), 5 (p = 0.013), 7 (p = 0.012) and 10 (p = 0.032) min after injecting luciferin-loaded albumin-shelled MBs. The delivery efficiency was, thus, improved with US-mediated release, allowing reduction of the total injection dose of luciferin.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22929655
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10481
      1. Author :
        von Schwarzenberg, K.; Wiedmann, R. M.; Oak, P.; Schulz, S.; Zischka, H.; Wanner, G.; Efferth, T.; Trauner, D.; Vollmar, A. M.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Biol Chem
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        N/A
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence
      12. Abstract :
        The vacuolar H+-ATPase (V-ATPase), a multisubunit proton pump, has come into focus as an attractive target in cancer invasion. However little is known about the role of V-ATPase in cell death and especially the underlying mechanisms remain mostly unknown. We used the myxobacterial macrolide archazolid B, a potent inhibitor of the V-ATPase, as an experimental drug as well as a chemical tool to decipher V-ATPase related cell death signaling. We found that archazolid induced apoptosis in highly invasive tumor cells at nanomolar concentrations which was executed by the mitochondrial pathway. Prior to apoptosis induction archazolid lead to the activation of a cellular stress response including activation of the hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF1alpha) and autophagy. Autophagy was induced at low concentrations of archazolid that do not alter pH in lysosomes and was shown by degradation of p62 or fusion of autophagosomes with lysosomes. HIF1alpha was induced due to energy stress shown by a decline of the ATP level and followed by a shut down of energy consuming processes. As silencing HIF1alpha increases apoptosis, the cellular stress response was suggested to be a survival mechanism. We conclude that archazolid leads to energy stress which activates adaptive mechanisms like autophagy mediated by HIF1alpha and finally leads to apoptosis. We propose V-ATPase as a promising drugable target in cancer therapy caught up at the interplay of apoptosis, autophagy and cellular/metabolic stress.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23168408
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10480
      1. Author :
        Zhang, Z.; Hu, Z.; Gupta, J.; Krimmel, J. D.; Gerseny, H. M.; Berg, A. F.; Robbins, J. S.; Du, H.; Prabhakar, B.; Seth, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Gene Ther
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        19
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        4T1-luc2, IVIS, Bioluminescence, Adenoviridae/genetics/*metabolism/physiology; Administration, Intravenous; Animals; Bone Neoplasms/secondary/*therapy; Cell Line, Tumor; Female; Humans; Immunocompetence; Luminescent Measurements/methods; Mammary Neoplasms, Experimental/pathology/*therapy; Mice; Mice, Inbred BALB C; Oncolytic Virotherapy/methods; Oncolytic Viruses/genetics/metabolism/physiology; Phosphorylation; Promoter Regions, Genetic; Protein-Serine-Threonine Kinases/genetics/*metabolism; Receptors, Transforming Growth Factor beta/genetics/*metabolism; Signal Transduction; Smad2 Protein/genetics/metabolism; Telomerase/genetics; Transforming Growth Factor beta1/genetics/metabolism; Transplantation, Isogeneic/methods; Tumor Stem Cell Assay/methods; Virus Replication
      12. Abstract :
        We have examined the effect of adenoviruses expressing soluble transforming growth factor receptorII-Fc (sTGFbetaRIIFc) in a 4T1 mouse mammary tumor bone metastasis model using syngeneic BALB/c mice. Infection of 4T1 cells with a non-replicating adenovirus, Ad(E1-).sTbetaRFc, or with two oncolytic adenoviruses, Ad.sTbetaRFc and TAd.sTbetaRFc, expressing sTGFbetaRIIFc (the human TERT promoter drives viral replication in TAd.sTbetaRFc) produced sTGFbetaRIIFc protein. Oncolytic adenoviruses produced viral replication and induced cytotoxicity in 4T1 cells. 4T1 cells were resistant to the cytotoxic effects of TGFbeta-1 (up to 10 ng ml(-1)). However, TGFbeta-1 induced the phosphorylation of SMAD2 and SMAD3, which were inhibited by co-incubation with sTGFbetaRIIFc protein. TGFbeta-1 also induced interleukin-11, a well-known osteolytic factor. Intracardiac injection of 4T1-luc2 cells produced bone metastases by day 4. Intravenous injection of Ad.sTbetaRFc (on days 5 and 7) followed by bioluminescence imaging (BLI) of mice on days 7, 11 and 14 in tumor-bearing mice indicated inhibition of bone metastasis progression (P<0.05). X-ray radiography of mice on day 14 showed a significant reduction of the lesion size by Ad.sTbetaRFc (P<0.01) and TAd.sTbetaRFc (P<0.05). Replication-deficient virus Ad(E1-).sTbetaRFc expressing sTGFbetaRIIFc showed some inhibition of bone metastasis, whereas Ad(E1-).Null was not effective in inhibiting bone metastases. Thus, systemic administration of Ad.sTbetaRFc and TAd.sTbetaRFc can inhibit bone metastasis in the 4T1 mouse mammary tumor model, and can be developed as potential anti-tumor agents for breast cancer.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22744210
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 7
      15. Serial :
        10479
      1. Author :
        Albanesi, M.; Mancardi, D. A.; Macdonald, L. E.; Iannascoli, B.; Zitvogel, L.; Murphy, A. J.; Leusen, J. H.; Bruhns, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        J Immunol
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        189
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        mAb therapy for experimental metastatic melanoma relies on activating receptors for the Fc portion of IgG (FcgammaR). Opposing results on the respective contribution of mouse FcgammaRI, FcgammaRIII, and FcgammaRIV have been reported using the gp75-expressing B16 melanoma and the protective anti-gp75 mAb TA99. We analyzed the contribution of FcgammaRs to this therapy model using bioluminescent measurement of lung metastases loads, novel mouse strains, and anti-FcgammaR blocking mAbs. We found that the TA99 mAb-mediated effects in a combination therapy using cyclophosphamide relied on activating FcgammaRs. The combination therapy, however, was not more efficient than mAb therapy alone. We demonstrate that FcgammaRI and, unexpectedly, FcgammaRIII contributed to TA99 mAb therapeutic effects, whereas FcgammaRIV did not. Therefore, FcgammaRIII and FcgammaRI are, together, responsible for anti-gp75 mAb therapy of B16 lung metastases. Our finding that mouse FcgammaRIII contributes to Ab-induced tumor reduction correlates with clinical data on its human functional equivalent human FcgammaRIIIA (CD16A).
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23150715
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 8
      15. Serial :
        10482
      1. Author :
        Danussi, C.; Petrucco, A.; Wassermann, B.; Modica, T. M.; Pivetta, E.; Del Bel Belluz, L.; Colombatti, A.; Spessotto, P.
      2. Title :
      3. Type :
        Journal Article
      4. Year :
        2012
      5. Publication :
        Cancer Prev Res (Phila)
      6. Products :
      7. Volume :
        5
      8. Issue :
        N/A
      9. Page Numbers :
        N/A
      10. Research Area :
        N/A
      11. Keywords :
        B16-F10-luc2, B16F10-luc2, IVIS
      12. Abstract :
        The evidence that EMILIN1 (Elastic Microfibril Interface Located proteIN) deficiency in Emilin1(-/-) mice caused dermal and epidermal hyperproliferation and an abnormal lymphatic phenotype prompted us to hypothesize the involvement of this extracellular matrix component in tumor development and in lymphatic metastasis. Using the 12-dimethylbenz(alpha)anthracene/12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (DMBA/TPA) two-stage model of skin carcinogenesis, we found that Emilin1(-/-) mice presented an accelerated formation, a higher incidence, and the development of a larger number of tumors compared with their wild-type littermates. EMILIN1-negative tumors showed more Ki67-positive proliferating cells and higher levels of pErk1/2. In these tumors, PTEN expression was lower. Emilin1(-/-) mice displayed enhanced lymphangiogenesis both in the tumor and in the sentinel lymph nodes. Accordingly, tumor growth and lymph node metastasis of transplanted syngenic tumors were also increased in Emilin1(-/-) mice. In vitro transmigration assays through lymphatic endothelial cells showed that EMILIN1 deficiency greatly facilitated tumor cell trafficking. Overall, these data established that EMILIN1 exerts a protective role in tumor growth, in tumor lymphatic vessel formation, as well as in metastatic spread to lymph nodes and reinforced the importance of its presence in the microenvironment to determine the tumor phenotype.
      13. URL :
        http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22827975
      14. Call Number :
        PKI @ kd.modi @ 9
      15. Serial :
        10483
Back to Search
Select All  |  Deselect All